Bourns College of Engineering

Research Funding Opportunities

Revised June 4, 2018

 

NOTICE: CONDITIONS OF USE

The information on this page is for the use of the faculty, staff, and students of the University of California, Riverside, Bourns College of Engineering. It is compiled from information that we believe to be reliable, but the University takes no responsibility for any errors or inaccuracies.

 

 

 

Opportunity details (sorted by due date, sort of):

 

 

June

 

 

NSF: Real-Time Learning and Decision-Making in Engineered Systems (Real-D) (DCL 18-063)

Due June 1, 2018

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2018/nsf18063/nsf18063.jsp?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

This letter invites EAGER proposals (brief proposals for early-stage research) to support research in fundamental theory, algorithms, engineering principles, and applications for real-time learning and decision-making that may lead the way toward safe, reliable, and efficient data-enabled engineering systems. To encourage convergence research, proposals are expected to have (PI)s that (has)have complementary expertise and significant research background in: the domain of the specific engineering infrastructure systems under consideration; and in machine learning, optimization, systems modeling and control and/or data science.

Examples of research topics include but are not limited to:

    Theory, methods, and implementation of distributed real-time learning and decision-making with substantial improvement compared to other distributed real-time learning algorithms and traditional centralized processing.

    Theory, development, and implementation of real-time learning of unlabeled data which could then be used together with a model-based approach, supervised learning algorithms, and/or anomaly detection methods.

    Innovations in theory and methods that can exploit availability of data -- historical and real-time - to achieve higher fidelity dynamic models of complex high-order interconnected systems and to formulate advanced control strategies for such systems.

    Innovative approaches for combining model-based and model-free approaches including evaluation of data trustworthiness and fairness, and methods for model validation.

NSF has been using the EAGER program to get around the fact that there has been no federal budget for a couple of years. NSF can’t create new programs without budget authorization, so this is a way to go in new directions without creating a new program. It is likely that this Dear Colleague Letter is indicative of where NSF intends to go now that there is a federal budget.

 

 

Air Force Young Investigator Program (FA9550-18-S-0002)

Due June 1, 2018

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=301416

The program objective is to foster creative basic research in science and engineering; enhance early career development of outstanding young investigators; and increase opportunities for the young investigator to recognize the Air Force mission and related challenges in science and engineering.

Most YIP awards are funded up to $150,000 per year for three years, for a total of $450,000. Exceptional proposals will be considered individually for higher funding levels and/or longer duration. The Air Force anticipates 36 awards dependent on available funding.

Eligibility: Must have received your doctorate no earlier than April 1, 2012. Must hold a full-time permanent, career-competitive or tenure-track position, or get a letter saying you will be considered for such a position. Must be U.S. citizen, national, or permanent resident by October 1, 2018.

 

 

DOD Medical Countermeasures Systems (BAA MCS-BAA-17-01)

Pre-proposals accepted until June 1, 2018

https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity&mode=form&tab=core&id=a156930223d0344d97c533a662ff83d9

The Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical and Biological Defense has released Broad Agency Announcement MCS-BAA-17-01, Medical Countermeasures Systems. This BAA invites pre-proposals in the following topic areas. Pre-proposals can lead to invitations for full proposals. In general, this program does not support basic research; it is interested in efforts directed toward the development of enabling technologies that speed up the advanced development process leading to FDA approval of countermeasures. And in general they expect 1:1 cost sharing.

1. MEDICAL BIOLOGICAL PROPHYLAXIS

a. Biological Medical Prophylaxis provides medical countermeasures against biological warfare agents.

b. Biological Medical Prophylaxis countermeasures should protect against battle space challenge of biological warfare agents (BWA).

c. Other overarching priorities in Biological Medical Prophylaxis.

d. Prevention, treatment, or supportive care regimens for adverse reactions to prophylaxis or pretreatments.

e. Enabling technologies that support, facilitate, or accelerate the development or licensure of Biological Medical Prophylaxis countermeasures.

2. MEDICAL CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL COUNTERMEASURES

a. Prophylactic/pretreatment and therapeutic pharmaceuticals

3. MEDICAL RADIOLOGICAL COUNTERMEASURES

The goal of the Medical Radiological Countermeasures (MRADC) projects are to select, develop, and manufacture FDA-approved drugs, biologics and diagnostics (e.g., biodosimetry) to increase survival and decrease incapacity by treating or detecting the incipient or manifest radiation injury following exposure to radiation from nuclear or radiological weapons so that Warfighters can maintain operational effectiveness.

4. MEDICAL DIAGNOSTIC AND SURVEILLANCE SYSTEMS

The DoD has a need for technologies for the prediction, detection, identification, and clinical diagnosis of infection by warfare pathogens and toxins. Sensitivity, specificity, ease of use, and deployability (size, weight, power requirements, and reduced consumables) are critical features of such systems.

5. DEFENSE BIOLOGICAL PRODUCT ASSURANCE OFFICE

To develop, test, produce, field and sustain timely, affordable Joint Integrated Force Protection, CBRNE Analytics and Response Capabilities to protect our Forces at home and abroad from warfare threats to national security in the face of a changing, complex and uncertain global environment.

 

 

NIH: Synthetic Biology for Engineering Applications (R01 Clinical Trial Optional) (PAR-18-434)

Proposals will be accepted on February 5, June 5, and October 5 until June 2020.

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/how-to-apply-application-guide/due-dates-and-submission-policies/due-dates.htm

This is a reissue of PAR-17-334.

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites applications to conduct research to advance the understanding and application of synthetic biology for human health. It will support 1) the development of innovative tools and technologies in synthetic biology and 2) their application in biomedical research and human health. An integrative research plan based on collaborations of synthetic biologists with computational scientists, cell biologists, engineers, and/or physician scientists is strongly recommended. Early Stage Investigators in Synthetic Biology are especially encouraged to apply.

Synthetic biology for human health is advancing, but major challenges, such as the inability to engineer robust complex metabolic and signaling networks or to produce cells with reliable and predicable behavior once in the host, currently limit application. This FOA encourages the development of tools and technology to tackle challenges in biomedical research and in cell-based therapies and diagnostics. Specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to, those listed below.

-- Cell-free and cell-based systems for testing and analyzing biological systems and for the efficient and scalable synthesis of complex biological products

-- Cell-free (prototyping genetic circuits, discovering and evolving enzymes, and conducting biomolecular reactions)

-- Cell-based (materials and pharmaceutical production, microbiome reprogramming, diagnostics)

-- Natural and engineered biological circuits for implementing regulation and decision-making strategies in cells (modeling, analysis, design, and use of biological circuits, cell-cell communication, gene regulation, computation strategies)

-- Expanding biochemical functionality (novel genetic alphabets, changing molecular machinery of the cell, constructing genomically recoded organisms, genetically encoded reporters)

-- Advanced genome editing techniques for manipulating DNA (computational algorithms, zinc finger nucleases, TAL effector nucleases, CRISPR-Cas9)

-- Design and evolution strategies to construct biological systems (directed evolution, continuous evolution, multiplexed evolution)

A few participating institutes also have their own statements of interest incorporated into the solicitation.

The program will make R01 awards of up to five years.

 

 

NIH: Research on the Mechanisms and/or Behavioral Outcomes of Multisensory Processing (R01 - Clinical Trial Optional)

Proposals will be accepted February 5, June 5, and October 5, 2018. Letters of intent are requested one month before the proposal deadline.

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-18-545.html

This program will support projects that elucidate the mechanisms and/or behavioral outcomes of multisensory processing, the integration or processing of at least two distinct types of sensory input as defined by distinct receptor-type transduction, neural pathways and cognate perceptual quality.  Specifically, multiple sensory inputs may include the major traditional modalities of hearing, vision, taste, smell, balance, and touch.  Additional submodalities of body senses include but are not restricted to thermosensation, body position and proprioception, pain, itch, and general visceral sensation.  This FOA encourages research grant applications investigating multisensory processing in perception or other behavioral and social outcomes and/or the mechanisms underlying multisensory processing in the context of the described specific areas of research interests from the participating NIH Institutes, Centers, and Offices (ICOs).  The FOA is intended to encourage basic, behavioral, and/or clinical research projects examining the interactions between other neural systems, such as cognitive, affective, or motor processes, and multiple sensory modalities.  Multisensory research applications that do not align with the specific areas of research interests described below by the participating NIH ICOs should be submitted to the relevant parent R01 FOA.

For engineering faculty, this means that NIH is really interested in understanding how sensory inputs are processed, and not interested in building machines that mimic these processes. Still, however, maybe engineering faculty will find something in here that fits.

 

 

NIH: Promoting Research in Basic Neuroscience (R01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed) (PAS-18-483)

Due February 5, June 5, and October 5, through 2020, assuming that funding continues beyond this coming year.

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAS-18-483.html

The goal of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to stimulate research addressing fundamental questions in basic neuroscience. Proposed projects can address any area of neuroscience within the missions of NINDS and should focus on understanding the development, the structure and/or the function of the normal nervous system. While fundamental basic research often generates insights relevant to disorders of the nervous system, this FOA is not intended to stimulate research that is explicitly disease-related.

For grants within the NINDS mission, the following guidelines apply: (1) projects intended to understand the mechanisms of, or develop treatments for, neurological disease are outside the scope of this FOA; (2) projects that propose any disease-based or applied experiments within a primarily basic grant are also not appropriate; (3) applications aimed primarily at developing tools and resources for basic neuroscience research are of secondary interest; and (4) applications on topics that have traditionally been assigned to other NIH Institutes not participating in this FOA are not appropriate. Furthermore, since some basic neuroscience applications may be more suitable for the FOAs developed through the BRAIN Initiative, investigators are encouraged to carefully examine opportunities within that program (see BRAIN ). Applicants with questions about the NINDS mission and the goals of the BRAIN Initiative are strongly encouraged to contact NINDS Scientific/Research staff to determine if their anticipated applications are appropriate for this FOA. Finally, the NINDS believes that all research applications can be greatly strengthened if the design, execution, and interpretation of the proposed studies and supporting data are adequately described (for details see NINDS rigor).

NINDS intends to fund up to 12 awards, corresponding to a total of $5.0 million for fiscal year 2019. Future year amounts will depend on annual appropriations. The maximum project period is 5 years.

 

 

NIH: Bioengineering Research Partnerships (PAR-16-242)

Proposals will be accepted February 5, June 5, and October 5 annually through February 2019

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-16-242.html

The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement is to encourage collaborations between the life and physical sciences that: 1) apply a multidisciplinary bioengineering approach to the solution of a biomedical problem; and 2) integrate, optimize, validate, translate or otherwise accelerate the adoption of promising tools, methods and techniques for a specific research or clinical problem in basic, translational, or clinical science and practice. An application may propose design-directed, developmental, discovery-driven, or hypothesis-driven research and is appropriate for small teams applying an integrative approach to increase our understanding of and solve problems in biological, clinical or translational science.

 

 

Bioengineering Research Grants (BRG) (R01 Clinical Trial Optional) (PAR-18-206)

Due February 5, June 5, October 5 through February 2019

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-18-206.html

The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement is to encourage collaborations between the life and physical sciences that: 1) apply a multidisciplinary bioengineering approach to the solution of a biomedical problem; and 2) integrate, optimize, validate, translate or otherwise accelerate the adoption of promising tools, methods and techniques for a specific research or clinical problem in basic, translational, or clinical science and practice. An application may propose design-directed, developmental, discovery-driven, or hypothesis-driven research and is appropriate for small teams applying an integrative approach to increase our understanding of and solve problems in biological, clinical or translational science.

 

 

NIH: Understanding and Modifying Temporal Dynamics of Coordinated Neural Activity

R01: PAR-18-555, https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-18-555.html

R21: PAR-18-554, https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-18-554.html

The solicitation is open through 2020 with standard due dates:

R01: February 5, June 5, October 5

R21: February 16, June 16, October 16

A rich body of evidence suggests that optimal cognitive, affective, and social processes are associated with highly coordinated neural activity.  These findings suggest that oscillatory rhythms, their co-modulation across frequency bands, spike-phase correlations, spike population dynamics, and other patterns might be useful drivers of therapeutic development for treatment of cognitive, social, or affective symptoms in neuropsychiatric disorders. This funding opportunity supports projects that test whether modifying electrophysiological patterns during behavior can improve cognitive, affective, or social processingApplications must use experimental designs that incorporate active manipulations to address at least one, and ideally more, of the following topics: (1) in animals or humans, determine which parameters of neural coordination, when manipulated in isolation, improve particular aspects of cognitive, affective, or social processing;  (2) in animals or humans, determine how particular abnormalities at the genomic, molecular, or cellular levels affect the systems-level coordination of electrophysiological patterns during behavior; (3) determine whether in vivo, systems-level electrophysiological changes in behaving animals predict analogous electrophysiological and cognitive improvements in healthy persons or clinical populations; and (4) use biologically-realistic computational models that include systems-level aspects to understand the function and mechanisms by which oscillatory and other electrophysiological patterns unfold across the brain to impact cognitive, affective, or social processing.

 

 

NIH: Integrative Computational Biology for Analysis of NHLBI TOPMed Data (R01) (RFA-18-HL-020)

Optional letters of intent are due June 6, 2017, and June 6, 2018. Full proposals are due July 6, 2017, and July 6, 2018.

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HL-18-020.html

This program will make research awards to mine the data produced by the existing Trans Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) program. TOPMed aims to utilize high throughput omics to characterize a variety of HLBS diseases. TOPMed is well on its way to collecting whole genome sequence from over 100,000 well phenotyped individuals and is currently generating high-throughput expression and other “omics” data (RNA, DNA methylation, metabolites, proteins) from many of these individuals to complement whole genome sequence information.

Having produced an unprecedented volume of high-throughput data, TOPMed now seeks to turn its attention to effectively leveraging this resource through novel systems biology analyses to uncover disease pathobiology. Although lower costs and technological improvements in sequencing technology have vastly expanded our ability to generate large volumes of omics data, the ability to analyze such large datasets to extract biologically meaningful insights from them remains challenging. Systems level models incorporating trans-omics analyses will be an important step in uncovering the underlying biological networks, gene-gene and gene-environment interactions influencing disease and treatment outcomes. Thus, advanced analyses that incorporate genotype and phenotype datasets from thousands to tens of thousands of individuals are required to move TOPMed to the next phase of discovery.

Suggested research examples include, but are not limited to:

-- Investigation of pleiotropic gene effects and gene expression patterns across several cardiovascular risk factors

-- Identification of biomarkers (metabolites, genetic variants and DNA methylation) related to severity of outcomes in sickle cell patients

-- Machine learning approaches to search for likely areas of the genome related to hypertension and chronic kidney disease in African Americans

-- Network analysis across genetic variation, expression profiling, and clinical data to reveal pathways associated with increased COPD risk

-- Spatio-temporal dynamic modeling approaches to integrate environment and geographic information into TOPMed for study of gene-environment interactions

 

 

NIH: Academic-Industrial Partnerships to Translate and Validate in vivo Cancer Imaging Systems (PAR-17-093)

Due March 1, 2017; June 7, 2017; October 3, 2017; March 1, 2018; June 7, 2018; October 3, 2018; March 1, 2019; and June 7, 2019.

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-17-093.html

This program seeks to stimulate translations of scientific discoveries and engineering developments in imaging or spectroscopic technologies into methods or tools that address problems in cancer biology, risk of cancer development, diagnosis, treatment, and/or disease status.

A distinguishing feature of each application will be formation of an academic-industrial partnership, which is a strategic alliance of investigators in academic, industrial, and any other entities who work together as partners to identify and translate a technological solution or mitigation of a cancer-related problem.

The goals for proposed technologies are imaging applications in clinical trials, clinical research, non-clinical research, and/or patient care. Among other possibilities, they may include pre-clinical imaging investigations or investigations that combine patient specimens and pre-clinical methods, or optimizations of methods across different commercial platforms, sites, or time.

There is no guidance in the solicitation on budget.

last updated 3/13/17 SS

 

 

USDA Specialty Crops

Due June 8, 2018

https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2018/05/09/2018-09868/notice-of-funding-availability-inviting-applications-for-the-technical-assistance-for-specialty

The USDA Comodity Credit Corporation (CCC) announces funding opportunity 2018-09868 for the 2019 Technical Assistance for Specialty Crops (TASC) program.

The purpose of this call is to solicit proposals from the U.S. private sector and government agencies for fiscal year 2019 and to set out criteria for the awarding of funds under the program.

The TASC program is designed to assist U.S. organizations by providing funding for projects that seek to remove, resolve, or mitigate sanitary, phytosanitary, or technical barriers that prohibit or threaten the export of U.S. specialty crops. U.S. specialty crops, for the purpose of the TASC program, are defined to include all cultivated plants, or the products thereof, produced in the United States except wheat, feed grains, oilseeds, cotton, rice, peanuts, sugar, and tobacco.

TASC Proposals must address the following:

--Projects should identify and address a clear sanitary, phytosanitary, or technical barrier that prohibits or threatens the export of U.S. specialty crops;

--Projects should demonstrably benefit the represented industry rather than a specific company or brand

--Projects must address barriers to exports of commercially-available U.S. specialty crops

--Projects should include an explanation as to what specifically could not be accomplished without Federal funding assistance and why the eligible organization(s) would be unlikely to carry out the project without such assistance

--Projects should include performance measures for quantifying progress and demonstrating results.

This NOFA is being released prior to Congress appropriating funding for the TASC program for FY 2019. USDA makes no commitment to fund any particular application or to make a specific number of awards regardless of whether or at what level program funding for FY 2019 is provided.

Award Amount: Up to $500,000 per year for up to 5 years.

No limit on number of proposals per person or organization, but an individual may only participate in up to 5 TASC-approved proposals at a time.

 

 

DOE: Buildings Energy Efficiency Frontiers & Innovation Technologies (BENEFIT) – 2018 (DE-FOA-0001825)

Concept papers are due June 8. Full applications are due August 23, 2018

at https://eere-exchange.energy.gov/#FoaIda7088ab7-5d11-45de-a78a-1618b9af8e27 or https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=304375

This program has six topic areas:

Topic 1 – Advanced Separation Technologies for Building Energy Efficiency. Development of Innovative separation technologies, such as membranes and ad/ab-sorption technologies, capable of significantly improving building energy efficiency in HVAC, water heating and appliances, and building envelope applications. ($500,000-$1M per award)

Topic 2 – Advanced Building Materials. Development of smart, tunable, and highly insulating building envelope materials to enable significant reductions in cooling and heating loads. ($500,000-$1.5M per award)

Topic 3 – High-Performance Windows. Development of highly insulating R7 to R10 window technologies, as well as advanced coatings for dynamic glazing. ($500,000-$1.5M per award)

Topic 4 – Novel Approaches for Cyber-physical Systems in Buildings. New and enhanced synergies at the nexus of building energy modeling (BEM) and Sensors and Controls (S&C) that together cover portions of the building cyber-physical space. ($500,000-$1.5M per award)

Topic 5 – Integration Research of Advanced Commercial Energy Efficiency Packages. Testing of next-generation building systems and equipment that improve efficiency across two or more building end uses in real-world operating conditions. ($300,000-$1M per award)

Topic 6 – Advancements in Natural Gas and Other Fuel-driven Equipment. Innovative solutions that significantly improve the energy efficiency of natural gas and other fuel-driven equipment and achieve a coefficient of performance (COP) of greater than 1.0. ($750,000-$1.5M per award)

DOE expects to make 14-24 awards from a $19.5 million pool. Awards will run up to 36 months. Cost sharing of 20% (i.e., 1:4, such that 20% of total costs are shared) is required.

A webinar is scheduled for May 8.

 

 

NSF: Achieving New Insights through Replicability and Reproducibility (DCL-18-053)

Due June 11, 2018

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2018/nsf18053/nsf18053.jsp?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

The National Science Foundation's (NSF) Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (SBE) encourages submission of proposals that target reproducibility and replicability efforts in data-intensive domains and that specifically rely on analysis of neuroimaging or neuroelectric data, including but not limited to electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography, electrocorticography and functional neuroimaging.

All proposals should: (1) make a strong case for the studies chosen for replication, reproduction or generalization; (2) substantiate the chosen analytic strategy; and (3) present a plan or template for evaluating, documenting, and communicating the lessons learned during the work. Ideally, submitted proposals should consider various analytic criteria for determining successful replication and argue which is most applicable in the context of the suggested research.

 

 

NIH: Independent Scientist Award (Parent K02 - Independent Clinical Trials Not Allowed) (PA-18-371)

Due February 12, June 12, and October 12 through 2020

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=298919

This solicitation pertains to these institutes only:

National Institute on Aging (NIA)

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)

National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR)

National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

The NIH Independent Scientist Award (K02) is intended to foster the development of outstanding scientists and enable them to expand their potential to make significant contributions to their field of research. It provides three to five years of salary support and "protected time" for newly independent scientists who can demonstrate the need for a period of intensive research focus as a means of enhancing their research careers.

Candidates must hold a doctoral degree, independent peer reviewed research support at the time the award is made, and commit a minimum of 9 person-months (75% of full-time professional effort) conducting research and relevant career development activities during the period of the award. Depending on the sponsoring Institute or Center (IC), scientists whose work is primarily theoretical may apply for this award in the absence of external research grant support. Receipt of prior support may have an impact on eligibility for the K02 award. Each independent scientist career award program must be tailored to meet the individual needs of the candidate. The sponsoring institution must demonstrate a commitment to provide the environment, resources and the protected time required for the candidate to perform the activities included in the proposed research and career development plans.

By the time of award, the individual must be a citizen or a non-citizen national of the United States or have been lawfully admitted for permanent residence (i.e., possess a currently valid Permanent Resident Card USCIS Form I-551, or other legal verification of such status.

Candidates for the K02 award must have a research or clinical doctoral degree, be newly independent, and have peer-reviewed, independent support at the time the award is made. Some of the participating NIH ICs require the candidate to have an NIH research grant at the time of application and that the support be from their IC. Other NIH ICs will accept candidates with peer-reviewed, independent research support from other sources.

 

 

NIH Transition to Independent Environmental Health Research (TIEHR) Career Award (PAR-18-291)

Due February 12, June 12, and October 12 through June 2019

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/how-to-apply-application-guide/due-dates-and-submission-policies/due-dates.htm

This program supports early-career faculty who are within the first three years of their appointment to their first independent faculty position at the time of submission (receipt date) of the application. This award is intended to provide junior faculty with pilot funding and salary support during this critical period of career development so that the candidate can further develop his/her independent research program and, subsequently, successfully compete for research funding in the environmental health sciences at the completion of the award.

Candidates must name a mentor who has active NIEHS grant support or a substantial history of NIEHS funded research grant support to provide appropriate guidance, advice and expertise to broaden the research skills of the candidate and assist in the formation of an advisory committee to the candidate and the candidate's research.

Research projects and career development activities proposed for this FOA  are expected to contribute to the mission of the NIEHS,  which is to discover how the environment affects people in order to promote healthier lives.

The program pays $75,000 toward the salary and $50,000 toward the research costs of the awardee.

 

 

NCI Mentored Research Scientist Development Award to Promote Diversity (K01 -Independent Clinical Trial Not Allowed) (PAR-18-364)

Due February 12, June 12, October 12 through 2020

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-18-364.html

This is a reissue of PAR-16-401.

The objective of the NCI Mentored Research Scientist Development Award to Promote Diversity (K01) is to enhance the diversity of the pool of NCI-funded research workforce by supporting eligible individuals from groups that have been shown to be nationally underrepresented in the biomedical, behavioral, social, and clinical sciences (African Americans, American Indians and Alaska Natives, Hispanics (or Latinos), Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders). This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) provides salary and research support for a sustained period of "protected time" (3-5 years) for intensive research career development under the guidance of an experienced mentor.

The PI must be from one of the underrepresented groups listed above and must have a research or health-professional doctoral degree.

This funding opportunity may support individuals who propose to train in a new field or individuals who have had a hiatus in their research career because of illness or pressing family circumstances. The intent of this K01 program is to support cancer research scientists in their early career stages. Candidates must have completed at least two, but usually not more than five years of postdoctoral training at the time of submitting a K01 application.

NIH will contribute up to $100,000 per year toward the salary of the career award recipient. NIH will contribute $30,000  per year toward the research development costs of the award recipient, which must be justified and consistent with the stage of development of the candidate and the proportion of time to be spent in research or career development activities.

A separate solicitation, PAR-18-365, is essentially the same opportunity but with a required clinical trial element.

 

 

NIH: Independent Scientist Award (Parent K02 - Independent Clinical Trials Not Allowed) (PA-18-371)

Due February 12, June 12, and October 12 through 2020

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=298919

This solicitation pertains to these institutes only:

National Institute on Aging (NIA)

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)

National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR)

National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

The NIH Independent Scientist Award (K02) is intended to foster the development of outstanding scientists and enable them to expand their potential to make significant contributions to their field of research. It provides three to five years of salary support and "protected time" for newly independent scientists who can demonstrate the need for a period of intensive research focus as a means of enhancing their research careers.

Candidates must hold a doctoral degree, independent peer reviewed research support at the time the award is made, and commit a minimum of 9 person-months (75% of full-time professional effort) conducting research and relevant career development activities during the period of the award. Depending on the sponsoring Institute or Center (IC), scientists whose work is primarily theoretical may apply for this award in the absence of external research grant support. Receipt of prior support may have an impact on eligibility for the K02 award. Each independent scientist career award program must be tailored to meet the individual needs of the candidate. The sponsoring institution must demonstrate a commitment to provide the environment, resources and the protected time required for the candidate to perform the activities included in the proposed research and career development plans.

By the time of award, the individual must be a citizen or a non-citizen national of the United States or have been lawfully admitted for permanent residence (i.e., possess a currently valid Permanent Resident Card USCIS Form I-551, or other legal verification of such status.

Candidates for the K02 award must have a research or clinical doctoral degree, be newly independent, and have peer-reviewed, independent support at the time the award is made. Some of the participating NIH ICs require the candidate to have an NIH research grant at the time of application and that the support be from their IC. Other NIH ICs will accept candidates with peer-reviewed, independent research support from other sources.

 

 

NSF/UK: Biological Informatics (DCL 18-072)

Letter of intent due June 12, 2018

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2018/nsf18072/nsf18072.jsp?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

This program supports collaborations between US and UK researchers, who submit a joint proposal to either agency in synthetic biology or synthetic microbial communities.

Synthetic Biology: Novel synthetic biology approaches to explore fundamental rules of life. Proposals must address foundational questions about principles that underpin biological systems such as: robustness in the organization and properties of biological regulatory networks, minimal genome design principles, synthetic protocell construction and fitness, origins of life, evolutionary constraints of biological processes, and emergent behaviour. It is expected that proposals will employ innovative synthetic biology methodologies and they may require mathematical or computational modelling to address complex systems-level challenges. Proposals focused solely on application of genome editing tools to explore the role of individual genes or pathways, or exclusively focused on production of value added chemicals without reference to innovation in synthetic biology tools or exploring fundamental rules of life will not be accepted.

Synthetic microbial communities: Use of constructed or well defined complex microbial communities within controllable environments to address fundamental questions relating to the mechanisms of interaction of communities, and of these communities with a non-human host. These studies should lead to the elucidation of principles governing the assembly, dynamics, stability and vulnerability to disturbance of the microbiome, including the influence of biotic and abiotic factors (viral, microbial, host, environmental). It is expected that these proposals will enable the identification of the functional properties of the microbiome, including relationships between rare and abundant microbial species, the metabolic and signaling interactions taking place in the community and between the community and the host, and the genes and molecules driving the microbiome-host relationship. Proposals that focus on the design, build and testing of synthetic microbial communities for industrial application or whose focus is on human health will not be accepted.

 

 

NIST Measurement Science and Engineering (MSE) Research Grant Programs (2016-NIST-MSE-01)

Open to at least June 13, 2017

https://www.nist.gov/sites/default/files/documents/2017/05/24/2016-nist-mse-01_amendment_nofo.pdf

This program will accept proposals on an ongoing basis in 12 programs, which I summarize very briefly here. In almost all cases, the program makes research grants, collaborative research cooperative agreements, and conference grants.

1. Materials Measurement Laboratory ($10,000 to $1 million over up to five years). Supports collaborative research in materials science and engineering, materials measurement science, biosystems and biomaterials, biomolecular measurements, chemical sciences, and applied chemicals and materials. Also supports conferences. You can direct proposals to:

a. MML Office

b. Materials Science and Engineering Division

c. Materials Measurement Science Division

d. Biosystems and Biomaterials Division

e. Biomolecular Measurement Division

f. Chemical Sciences Division

g. Applied Chemicals and Materials Division

2. Physical Measurement Laboratory (PML) ($5,000 to $250,000 over up to five years). Supports research in the broad areas of mechanical metrology, semiconductors, ionizing radiation physics, medical physics, biophysics, neutron physics, atomic physics, optical technology, optoelectronics, electromagnetics, time and frequency, quantum physics, weights and measures, quantum electrical metrology, temperature, pressure, flow, far UV physics, and metrology with synchrotron radiation.

a. PML Office

b. Office of Weights and Measures

c. Radiation Physics Division.

d. Semiconductor and Dimensional Metrology Division

e. Quantum Measurement Division

f. Sensor Science Division

g. Quantum Electronics and Photonics Division.

h. Electromagnetics Division

i. Time and Frequency Division

j. Quantum Physics Division

3. Engineering Laboratory (EL) (each lab has different limits, but some exceed $1 million). Supports research in machine tool and machining process metrology; advanced manufacturing; intelligent systems and information systems integration for applications in manufacturing; structures, construction metrology and automation; inorganic materials; polymeric materials; heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration (HVAC & R) equipment performance; mechanical systems and controls; heat transfer and alternative energy systems; computer integrated building processes; indoor air quality and ventilation; smart grid; windstorm impact reduction; applied economics; and fire research.

a. Applied Economics Office

b. Smart Grid and Cyber-Physical Systems Program

c. Materials and Structural Systems Division

d. Energy and Environment Division

e. Systems Integration Division

f. Intelligent Systems Division

g. National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program

h. Disaster and Failure Studies Program

4. Fire Research (FR) Grant Program (no dollar amount specified). Develops, verifies, and utilizes measurements and predictive methods to quantify the behavior of fire and means to reduce the impact of fire on people, property, and the environment. This work involves integration of laboratory measurements, verified methods of prediction, and large-scale fire experiments to demonstrate the use and value of the research products.

a. Fire Fighting Technology Group.

b. Engineered Fire Safety Group

c. Flammability Reduction Group

d. Wildland Urban Interface Fire Group

e. The National Fire Research Laboratory

5. Information Technology Laboratory (ITL) (no dollar amount specified).  Supports research in the broad areas of Advanced Network Technologies, Big Data, Cloud Computing, Computer Forensics, Information Access, Information Processing and Understanding, Cybersecurity, Health Information Technology, Human Factors and Usability, Mathematical and Computational Sciences, Mathematical Foundations Of Measurement Science For Information Systems; Metrology Infrastructure for Modeling and Simulation Smart Grid, Privacy Engineering, Software Testing, Statistics for Metrology And Statistical Methods In Forensic Science.

6. Communications Technology Laboratory (CTL) (no dollar amount specified). Supports the accelerated development, testing, and deployment of advanced communications technologies in support of both commercial and government applications including: high-speed electronics, wireless systems metrology, antenna and RF capabilities, high-speed and high frequency measurement capabilities, advanced optics, quantum communications, network design and optimization, network modeling, and public safety network communications. Within CTL there are three divisions: the Public Safety Communications Research Division, the Radio-Frequency (RF) Technology Division, and the Wireless Networks Division.

7. NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) (no dollar amount specified). Supports research involving neutron scattering and the development of innovative technologies that advance the state-of-the-art in neutron research.

8. Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (CNST). This organization does not anticipate any new funding in 2015. This is a national user facility, so you can apply to perform collaborative research with NIST scientists. This program is specifically aimed at developing essential measurement and fabrication methods and technology in support of all phases of nanotechnology development, from discovery to production; conducting collaborative research with CNST staff scientists and engineers; and supporting researchers visiting CNST to conduct such collaborative research.

9. Special Programs Office (SPO) Grant Program (no dollar amount specified). This program supports the broad areas of greenhouse gas and climate science measurements, forensic science, national security standards, and measurement science for energy research in accordance with these four programs:

a. Greenhouse Gas (GHG) and Climate Science Measurements Program

b. National Security Standards (NSS) Program

c. Forensic Sciences Program (FSP)

d. Measurement Science for Energy Research Program.

10. Standards Coordination Office (SCO) (no dollar amount specified). This office supports standards-related activities, coordination activities with the private sector and with other federal agencies on standards activities and programs, and standards development and conformity assessment activities tailored to equip U.S. industry with the standards-related tools and information necessary to effectively compete in the global marketplace.

11. 11.International and Academic Affairs Office (IAAO) (no dollar amount specified). This program support activities which facilitate the development of metrology and related research capabilities to support the global metrology system consistent with the NIST mission in the following fields: bioscience, chemistry, materials, physics, engineering, infrastructure, information technology, neutron research and nanotechnology, with an emphasis on the Western Hemisphere and Africa.

12. Associate Director for Laboratory Programs (ADLP) Grant Program (no dollar amount specified). This supports bioscience, chemistry, materials, physics, engineering, infrastructure, information technology, neutron research and nanotechnology.

 

 

NIH Advanced Development of Informatics Technologies for Cancer Research and Management (U24) (PAR-15-331)

Due November 20, 2015; June 14, 2016; November 21, 2016; June 14, 2017; November 20, 2017; June 14, 2018

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-15-331.html

This program supports advanced development and enhancement of emerging informatics technologies to improve the acquisition, management, analysis, and dissemination of data and knowledge across the cancer research continuum, including cancer biology, cancer treatment and diagnosis, cancer prevention, cancer control and epidemiology, and/or cancer health disparities. (PAR-15-332, by contrast, is for early-stage concepts.) As a component of the NCI's Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR) Initiative, this FOA focuses on emerging informatics technology, defined as one that has passed the initial prototyping and pilot development stage, has demonstrated potential to have a significant and broader impact, has compelling reasons for further improvement and enhancement, and has not been widely adopted in the cancer research field. The central mission of ITCR is to promote research-driven informatics technology across the development lifecycle to address priority needs in cancer research. In order to be successful, proposed development plans must have a clear rationale on why the proposed technology is needed and how it will benefit the cancer research field. In addition, mechanisms to solicit feedback from users and collaborators throughout the development process should be included. Awards can be up to $600,000 of direct costs per year for up to five years.

 

 

NIH Early-Stage Development of Informatics Technologies for Cancer Research and Management (U01) (PAR-15-332)

Due November 20, 2015; June 14, 2016; November 21, 2016; June 14, 2017; November 20, 2017; June 14, 2018

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-15-332.html

This will make U01 awards (cooperative agreements, which, unlike grants, involve a degree of collaboration with the sponsoring agency) for the development of enabling informatics technologies to improve the acquisition, management, analysis, and dissemination of data and knowledge across the cancer research continuum including cancer biology, cancer treatment and diagnosis, cancer prevention, cancer control and epidemiology, and/or cancer health disparities. As a component of the NCI's Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR) Program, this FOA focuses on early-stage development from prototyping to hardening and adaptation. Early-stage development is defined for the purpose of this FOA as the initial development or the significant modification of existing tools for new applications. The central mission of ITCR is to promote research-driven informatics technology across the development lifecycle to address priority needs in cancer research. In order to be successful, proposed development plans must have a clear rationale on why the proposed technology is needed and how it will benefit the cancer research field. In addition, mechanisms to solicit feedback from users and collaborators throughout the development process should be included. Awards will be up to $300,000 of direct costs per year for three years.

 

 

NIH Sustained Support for Informatics Resources for Cancer Research and Management (U24) (PAR-15-333)

Due November 20, 2015; June 14, 2016; November 21, 2016; June 14, 2017; November 20, 2017; June 14, 2018

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-15-333.html

This program supports the continued development and sustainment of high-value informatics research resources to serve current and emerging needs across the cancer research continuum including cancer biology, cancer treatment and diagnosis, cancer prevention, cancer control and epidemiology, and/or cancer health disparities. As a component of the NCI’s Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR) Program, this FOA focuses on supporting activities necessary for improved user experience and availability of existing, widely-adopted informatics tools and resources.  This is in contrast to early-stage and advanced development efforts to generate these tools and resources that are supported by separate ITCR FOAs. The central mission of ITCR is to promote research-driven informatics technology across the development lifecycle to address priority needs in cancer research. In order to be successful, the proposed sustainment plan must provide clear justifications for why the research resource should be maintained and how it has benefited and will continue to benefit the cancer research field.  In addition, mechanisms for assessing and maximizing the value of the resource to researchers and supporting collaboration and/or deep engagement between the resource and the targeted research community should be described. No guidance is provided on the budget.

 

 

ARPA-E: Duration Addition to Electricity Storage (DAYS) (DE-FOA-0001906)

Mandatory letter of intent due June 15, full proposal July 2, 2018

https://arpa-e-foa.energy.gov/Default.aspx#FoaIdc931d71c-1e66-4fea-8a27-91860bcd781d

The primary objective of the DAYS program is the development of long-duration electricity storage (LDES) systems that deliver electricity at a levelized cost of storage (LCOS) of 5 cents/kWh-cycle across the full range of storage durations (i.e. 10 to approximately 100 hours). This requirement results in a target lifetime cost that decreases with increasing storage duration, a marked divergence from many existing storage cost targets that focus on a single duration and thus a single cost metric. The LCOS target of 5 cents/kWh-cycle likely requires system round-trip efficiencies greater than 50%.

For this focused program, ARPA-E expects chemical, electrochemical, thermal, and mechanical technical approaches to potentially address this problem statement.

The program has two categories:

• Daily-plus cycling (Category 1): LDES systems that provide daily cycling, in addition to longer-duration, less frequent cycling.

• Non-daily cycling (Category 2): LDES systems that do not provide daily cycling and only provide less frequent cycling.

ARPA-E expects to make 10-15 awards ranging from $500,000 to $10 million each from a $30 million pool. Projects will run 18-36 months.

Cost sharing of 20% of total project cost (1:4) is generally required. This can be reduced to 5% (1:19) if the proposer is a university, consortium of universities, or universities plus federal labs.

 

 

NIH: NIBIB Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (R21 Clinical Trial Optional) (PAR-18-433)

Proposals will be accepted February 16, June 16, and October 16 through 2020

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-18-433.html

This program will make R21 exploratory awards (up to $275,000 of direct costs over up to two years)  for projects expected to lead to breakthroughs in development of innovative techniques, agents, methodologies, models, or their applications. These studies may involve considerable risk that should be balanced by the potential high impact on human-health and related research. Applicants are expected to propose novel biomedical research approaches for which there is no preliminary data to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed project. A project may be exploratory, developmental, proof of concept, or high risk-high impact, and may be technology design-directed, discovery-driven, or hypothesis-driven.

Applications must not include preliminary data that demonstrate the feasibility of the specific aims. Applications including preliminary data will be considered noncompliant with the FOA instructions. Availability of preliminary data demonstrating feasibility of the proposed approach is an indication that the proposed project has advanced beyond the exploratory stage defined by this program, and makes the application unsuitable for this funding opportunity. Appropriate justification for the proposed work could be provided through literature citations.  For this FOA, preliminary data are defined as data not yet published in a peer-reviewed journal. For example, unpublished data or data presented in an abstract for a scientific meeting, or used in an oral or poster presentation are considered preliminary data and such data should not exist for studies proposed in these applications.

New and Early Stage Investigators should consider submitting to the NIBIB Trailblazer Award (https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-16-390.html), which supports an enhanced, three-year R21 grant.

 

 

NIDDK: Small Grants for New Investigators to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research (R21 Clinical Trial Optional) (PAR-18-102)

Due February 16, June 16, and October 16, 2018

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-18-102.html

The purpose of this FOA is to provide support for New Investigators from backgrounds nationally underrepresented in biomedical and behavioral research to conduct small research projects in the scientific mission areas of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). The R21 is intended to support small research projects that can be carried out in a short period of time with limited resources and seeks to facilitate the transition to research independence of New Investigators from backgrounds underrepresented in the biomedical and behavioral sciences. The R21 grant mechanism supports different types of projects including pilot and feasibility studies; secondary analysis of existing data; small, self-contained research projects; development of research methodology; and development of new research technology.

 

 

NIH: T2 Translational Research: Research Leading to New Health Care Practices, Community Programs and Policies Affecting Older Persons (R21 Clinical Trial Optional) (PAR-18-178)

Due February 16 and June 16, 2018

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-18-178.html

This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) encourages exploratory/developmental research projects on translational research (T2) directed towards development of health care practices, community programs and policies, including monitoring and quality improvement for pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches for preventing and treating key health issues affecting the elderly. For the purposes of this FOA, T2 translational research on aging is defined as research to gather information needed to develop or evaluate methods of translating results from clinical studies into everyday clinical practice and health decision making (e.g., adapting an efficacious intervention for application in clinical practice and evaluating its effectiveness in different clinical settings). Methods for T2 translational research include but are not limited to intervention studies, systematic reviews, meta analysis, outcomes research and implementation research.

Under R21, budgets are limited to $275,000 of direct costs over no more than two years.

 

 

NIH: Exploratory/Developmental Bioengineering Research Grants (PAR-18-286)

Due February 16, June 16, and October 16, 2018.

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-18-286.html

This program is supported by the following institutes only:

National Cancer Institute (NCI)

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)

National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)

The program will support Exploratory/Developmental Bioengineering Research Grants (EBRG) applications which establish the feasibility of technologies, techniques or methods that: 1) explore a new multidisciplinary approach to a biomedical challenge; 2) are high-risk but have high impact; and 3) develop data that may lead to significant future research. An EBRG application may propose hypothesis-driven, discovery-driven, developmental, or design-directed research and is appropriate for evaluating unproven approaches for which there is minimal or no preliminary data. 

 

 

NIH Imaging - Science Track Award for Research Transition (I/START) (R03) (PAR-15-326)

Proposals will be accepted February 16, June 16, and October 16 through June 2018.

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-15-326.html

This program makes small exploratory R03 grants in support of (1) investigators who are interested in neuroimaging but have not worked in this area before or (2) established investigators who want to do proof-of-concept research on a new imaging approach. Funding is available for new approaches to imaging or proof-of-concept of established imaging techniques in a new neuroscience domain.

It is important to note that research proposed under the I/START program need not be conducted in drug-abusing populations or involve drug administration; however, the potential relevance to understanding drug abuse must be clearly delineated.

R03 grants are for up to $150,000 of direct costs over one year.

 

 

NIH: Exploratory Research for Technology Development (PAR-17-046)
Proposals will be accepted February 16, June 16, and October 16 through February 2019

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-17-046.html

This program will make R21 awards (up to $275,000 of direct costs over up to two years) for exploratory research leading to the development of innovative technologies for biomedical research. The program will recognize and reward high risk approaches with potential for significant impact.  Projects will entail a high degree of risk or novelty, which will be offset by a correspondingly high potential impact. However, the possible impact is likely to be far off. Application of the proposed technology to specific biomedical questions is considered beyond the scope of the program, and should not be included. Preliminary data demonstrating feasibility of the proposed approach indicates that the project is beyond the scope of this program and therefore unsuitable for this funding opportunity. 

Projects should be justified on the basis of a strong potential to advance biomedical research if successful. This rationale should justify the investment of resources in the proposed technology in terms of its potential as an enabling tool for research. The rationale should be broad. Technologies specific to a single organism, system, or disease are not appropriate.

Project aims should focus on either: (a) exploratory research to differentiate possible technical approaches to determine the one most likely to be successful, or (b) demonstrating feasibility of a specific proposed approach.

Projects should have a high risk of failure. Feasibility of a project should not be supported by preliminary data. Projects with preliminary data should be submitted under the Focused Technology Research and Development program.

Projects should be focused on technical questions regarding the development of a novel research tool. Projects sufficiently mature to include application to biomedical research problems are inappropriate for this program and should be submitted under the Parent R01 FOA.

 

 

NIH Exploratory/Developmental Bioengineering Research Grants (R21) (PA-16-040)

Due February 16, June 16, and October 16 annually through October 2018

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-16-040.html

This R21 grant program will support applications which establish the feasibility of technologies, techniques or methods that: 1) explore a unique multidisciplinary approach to a biomedical challenge; 2) are high-risk but have a considerable pay-off; and 3) develop data which can lead to significant future research. An EBRG application may propose hypothesis-driven, discovery-driven, developmental, or design-directed research and is appropriate for evaluating unproven approaches for which there is minimal or no preliminary data.

Ten NIH institutes are participating. Three put specific areas of interest into the solicitation, so what you see below reflects only the interests of those three institutes. If you have an idea that falls outside of these areas, you very well still could have an idea that fits in the program.

The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) is interested in the development of diagnostics, therapeutics, surgical technologies, computational and systems biology, biomaterials and nanotechnology, as applied to the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and non-malignant hematologic mission areas of the Institute. Topic areas include, but are not limited to, the development of: i) noninvasive and nondestructive 3D imaging methods for in vivo monitoring, ii) techniques for metabolic imaging of disease progression, iii) research tools such as molecular imaging probes, microfluidics, and nanotechnologies, and iv) novel diagnostic and medical devices. Of special interest are new bioengineering approaches to improve cardiovascular repair and regeneration, artificial lungs as a bridge to transplant or for treatment of lung failure, and new additive solutions, storage bags and/or new processes to enhance blood cell function and survival after storage and transfusion. Additionally, the interests of NHLBI include research tools, methods and technologies that facilitate therapeutic advances and behavioral changes to address problems in energy balance, weight control, and obesity (see: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HL-07-007.html)

The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) seeks research in building complex 3-dimensional in vitro human musculoskeletal and skin tissue models to study developmental biology, physiology, and disease pathogenesis as well as for drug discovery and toxicity studies. NIAMS is not interested in applications are developing 3D tissues for transplantation, or engineering non-human tissue models, or developing simple 3-D models that do not go significantly beyond those currently in use, such as human skin equivalents composed of only normal keratinocytes and fibroblasts.

The Office of Research on Women’s Health (ORWH) (http://orwh.od.nih.gov/) is interested in biomedical research that specifically addresses the purpose of the FOA within the context of sex differences research and diseases that disproportionately affect women and girls.

The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) is interested in 1) The development of technologies and integrated devices for improved personal exposure assessment. A particular emphasis is on the development of technologies that will enable untargeted, agnostic, associations between exposures and disease in support of the exposome concept. 2) The development of technologies to enable research into the mechanisms of response to environmental exposures. This includes the development of ‘omics technologies and systems modeling techniques to assess the differential response of biological networks to environmental perturbations. 3) The development of moderate to high throughput screens for the assessment of potential toxicants. A particular emphasis is on the development of model systems that more closely reflect the response of humans including engineered 3D tissue systems originating from human tissues and induced pluripotent cells and the development of humanized animal models such as mouse models with enhanced genetic diversity similar to human populations.

This program is open to January 2016, and will accept proposals on February 16, June 16, and October 16 annually until then.

 

 

EPA: Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (EPA-G2018-ORD-A1)

Due June 18, 2018

https://www.epa.gov/research-grants/national-priorities-and-polyfluoroalkyl-substances

The purpose of this program is to better understand the impacts of per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) on water quality and availability across the U.S.  The Agency is seeking new information on 1) the fate and transport of short (C4 to C7) and long-chain (≥ C8) PFAS in the environment, including per- and poly-fluorinated carboxylic acids, sulfonic acids, and ethers, and associated precursor and transformation products; 2) comprehensive human and ecosystem exposure to PFAS; and 3) PFAS toxicity, modes of action, physiologically-based pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, and other topics related to hazard assessment.  Proposals may address any or all of these topic areas in support of the development of robust risk assessments for human and ecological exposure to PFAS in water.

EPA expects to make two awards from a $3.96 million pool. Cost sharing is required at 25% of the EPA contribution.

 

 

DOE: Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology Research and Development (R&D) – 2018 (DE-FOA-0001823)

Due June 18, 2018

https://eere-exchange.energy.gov/#FoaIdb9afac73-0500-4ec6-9a22-ae5adeaa1652 or https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=304376

This program has four topic areas:

Topic Area 1 – Core Technology Research for LEDs, OLEDs and Cross-Cutting Lighting Research:

BTO seeks early-stage research to develop innovative advancements into the underlying science for SSL technology.  Core Technology research encompasses scientific efforts that focus on new knowledge or understanding of the subject under study, with specific application to SSL.  Core Technology Research aims to demonstrate scientific principles, technical application, and application benefits.  Acceptable areas of research under this topic area are physiological impacts of light and light utilization efficiency.  Proposed approaches are strongly encouraged to tie the research to energy savings potential for SSL technology and to quantify this benefit where applicable.

-- Physiological Impacts of Light

-- Light Utilization Efficiency

DOE expects to make up to 8 awards from a $1.5M pool in Topic Area 1. Cost sharing of at least 20% (1:4) is required.

Topic Area 2- Proof-of-Concept and Prototype Development for LEDs and OLEDs:

BTO seeks early-stage research to contribute to the development of SSL prototypes. Applicants are encouraged to apply early-stage concepts towards the development of advanced proof-of-concept SSL materials, devices, and luminaires.  Acceptable areas of research under this topic area include high efficacy LED prototypes, advanced LED lighting, LED power electronics, OLED light engine, OLED prototype lighting platforms, and OLED panel light extraction and utilization.  Proposed approaches are encouraged to tie the research to energy savings potential for SSL technology and to quantify this benefit using the respective tables below.

-- Advanced LED Lighting

-- LED Power Electronics

-- OLED Light Engine

-- OLED Prototype Lighting Platforms

-- OLED Panel Light Extraction and Utilization

DOE expects to make up to 4 awards from a $1.5M pool in Topic Area 2. Cost sharing of at least 25% (1:3) is required.

Topic Area 3 – Advanced Fabrication R&D

BTO seeks early-stage research to contribute to advanced manufacturing of SSL technology.  Research in this area should focus on the underlying chemical and physical aspects of SSL fabrication.  Acceptable areas of research under this topic area include LED advanced fabrication approaches, OLED substrate and encapsulation fabrication, and OLED panel fabrication.  Proposed approaches are encouraged to tie the research to energy savings potential for SSL technology and to quantify this benefit using the respective tables below.

-- LED Advanced Manufacturing

-- OLED Substrate and Encapsulation Fabrication

-- OLED Panel Fabrication

DOE expects to make up to 2 awards from a $1.5M pool in Topic Area 3. Cost sharing of at least 25% (1:3) is required.

Topic Area 4 – Innovative Lighting in a Limited Mock Field Application

BTO seeks to assess innovative lighting system solutions in a limited mock field application setting for lighting.  Acceptable applications for this topic are expected to develop technical resources and data sets which ultimately help researchers refine or refocus development of SSL-based devices, luminaires, and systems.  Approaches are expected to encompass the technical activities of product concept modeling to the development of test models and field-ready prototypes.

DOE expects to make up to 2 awards from a $500,000 pool in Topic Area 2. Cost sharing of at least 25% (1:3) is required.

A webinar is scheduled for May 7.

 

 

DOE/NETL: Industry Partnerships for Cybersecurity of Energy (DE-FOA-0001755)

Due June 18, 2018

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=303273, which will take you to FedConnect, or you can just go to FedConnect.net, choose the “public opportunities” button, and then search by reference number DE-FOA-0001755. The actual solicitation is in the “Documentation” window at the right side of the screen

Proposed solutions should be interoperable, scalable, readily manageable advanced tools and technologies and are compatible with common methods and best practices. It is expected that a strategy for transitioning solutions into practice throughout the energy sector, for example through commercialization or by making the solution available through open source, will be included. The tools or technologies must not impede critical energy delivery functions; must not introduce a burden for operating and maintaining the system; must be manageable by asset owners; must recognize energy reliability as a priority; must be demonstrated at a relevant end-user site to validate a clear path to industry acceptance; and must be red-team tested by an independent third party using project funds.

This Announcement includes five Topic Areas:

Topic Area 1 – Redesign for Cyber-resilient Architecture – Electric and Oil and Natural Gas (ONG) Subsectors

Topic Area 2 – Cybersecurity for the Oil and Natural Gas (ONG) Environment

Topic Area 3 – Cybersecure Communications

Topic Area 4 – Cybersecure Cloud-based Technologies in the Operation Technology (OT) Environment

Topic Area 5 - Innovative Technologies that Enhance Cybersecurity in the Energy Sector

Every project must have an effective strategic approach to establish a partnership with cybersecurity stakeholders in the energy sector including but not limited to energy utilities, asset owners and operators, cybersecurity service provider to the energy sector, suppliers and integrators of energy delivery control systems and components, and/or academia.

Awards are expected to be between $2 million and $3 million. Research activities require 20% cost share (1:4), and demonstration activities require 50% cost share (1:1).

 

 

USAID Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Safety

Concept Notes due June 22, 2018

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=305537

The US Agency for International Development (USAID) requests applications to manage and implement the Feed the Future Innovation Lab For Food Safety (FSIL).

The Food Safety Innovation Lab will be responsible for informing both U.S. and developing country stakeholders of new technologies and benefits arising from food safety research. Through the establishment of strong relationships with national agricultural research institutions and other public and private partners overseas, U.S. researchers gain access to international knowledge and expertise, raised awareness of the global investment landscape, and appreciate the challenges and technologies used in those countries.

USAID seeks the expertise of the food safety, food processing and agricultural research community to address three areas of inquiry:

-- Area of Inquiry 1: Improving Human Outcomes: Improved knowledge and practices related to how food safety systems achieve improved nutrition

-- Area of Inquiry 2: Reduce and mitigate risk: technologies, knowledge, and practices that reduce, manage, and mitigate increased food safety risks, strengthening and building a resilient food safety system

-- Area of Inquiry 3: Advancing the Productivity Frontier: food safety at the firm, farm and household levels: pro-poor technologies and practices that improve food safety and healthy diet

Important Dates

-- Webinar for Q&A   June 5, 2018 at 10 am Pacific Time

-- Concept Notes – due June 22, 2018

-- Successful Concept Note applicants will be invited to submit a full proposal. They will also be invited to present their concept note to USAID via webinar on July 2, 2018.

The budget can be up to $10 million total for 5 years for a Leader Award. Up to an additional $10 million may be provided for buy-ins to the Leader Award, and up to $10 million for Associate Awards over the 5-year project period.

 

 

DOE: Novel Methods for Making Products from Carbon Dioxide or Coal (DE-FOA-0001849)

Due June 25 or July 13, 2018, depending on program

Go to www.fedconnect.net, click on Search Public Opportunities, and then search by reference number DE-FOA-0001849. Alternatively, you can start at https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=305422.

This program has three topic areas:

Area of Interest #1 - Lab-scale CO2 Conversion (3-8 awards expected, $800,000 per award over up to 36 months, 20% cost sharing)

This AOI focuses on laboratory scale projects that develop novel abiotic methods to convert carbon dioxide to marketable products.   It is expected that the laboratory projects will use synthetic flue gas for testing of the novel concepts. Abiotic conversion approaches include, but are not limited to, catalytic and chemical conversion using thermal, electrical, and sunlight as energy sources to drive the reactions toward intermediary products or directly to valuable products.  Conversion of pure CO2   with or without secondary feedstocks (CH4, CO), are acceptable.  The addition of CO2 to chemical intermediates made from petroleum and natural gas adds functionality to the chemical, which can improve the performance of finished products such as plastics, foams, adhesive, films, and coatings.  This improved performance translates into a premium for the manufacturer.   R&D in this area will focus on identifying new performance chemicals and polymers and developing synthesis pathways for their manufacture from CO2 that would otherwise be emitted to the atmosphere.    Approaches using advanced thermal, electrical, and photo catalysis and chemical conversion are of interest as well as the use of plasmas or other high energy approaches to relax the bonds between C and O ultimately to convert CO2 to elemental carbon, CO and/or monomers that are building blocks for the chemical industry to make chemicals and advanced materials.  Biotic approaches (algae, bacteria) are NOT of interest for this area. 

Area of Interest #2 - Field-scale CO2 Conversion (up to 3 awards, up to $1.5M per award over up to 36 months, 20% cost sharing)

This AOI focuses on the conversion of CO2, with or without other feedstocks, at the field-scale   to products using either abiotic or biotic approaches. Abiotic conversion approaches include, but are not limited to, catalytic and chemical conversion using thermal, electrical, and sunlight as energy sources to drive the reactions toward intermediate products or directly to valuable products.  Biotic approaches include algae, bacteria or enzymes that can utilize CO2 to produce fuels, valuable chemicals or advanced materials.  To be considered ready for field-scale, research proposed for this AOI must have already successfully completed work at TRL 4 whereby testing was done in the laboratory on synthetic flue gas and the technology is ready to be tested at a TRL 5 on actual flue gas for the proposed work.  It is required that the field scale projects will use actual CO2 from coal combustion or industrial flue gas to produce their product(s).  Furthermore, private industry has been funding the development of small pilot facilities to convert carbon dioxide to products.  DOE recognizes that there are multiple developers working independently to move toward validating their processes at the small pilot scale but may have R&D needs to improve the efficiency and/or the quality of the product. Many of these projects are in the final stages of being designed and/or built.  It is appropriate for applicants to apply to this AOI requesting funding to support any remaining R&D necessary to optimize the effectiveness of their technologies.  Biotic approaches (algae, bacteria) ARE of interest under this AOI.

Area of Interest #3 – Coal Beneficiation Pilot Plant Testing (up to 3 awards, up to $2 million per award over up to 36 months, 20% cost sharing)

This AOI seeks applications from developers to support R&D on technologies that use coal to produce an upgraded coal fuel and value-added by-products.  Applications must include testing at existing pilot plants that can process at least two ranks of coal (as defined in ASTM D 388) to make an upgraded coal feedstock that can improve the efficiency of coal-fired power plants.  In addition to the upgraded coal feedstock, the technology must also create at least one valuable by-product.   The pilot plant facility must: (1) process nominally 3 tons of coal/day, (2) operate (separately) on two ranks of coal, and (3) produce data that can be used for design of commercial scale modules. DOE recognizes that there are multiple developers working independently that are moving toward validating their processes at the small pilot scale but may have R&D yet to complete to improve the process, diversify the feedstock and/or product slate, and/or improve the quality of the product.  Furthermore, if a pilot plant exists that operates with one rank of coal, this FOA allows the funding to be used for testing the validity of the process on that rank of coal, and one other rank. In addition to performing the pilot plant testing, applicants must (1) incorporate data generated from this pilot plant testing into an economic analysis to assess the economic feasibility of the technology showing the quantity of product streams that can be produced and what selling prices would be required for economic feasibility, (2) provide a market penetration analysis  of the upgraded coal product and all by-products created from the process, with a comparison of products produced by coal type, and (3) complete a technology gap analysis showing what additional R&D is needed (if any) to commercialize the technology.  Applications should include a description of (1) how the technology can improve the value chain for coal production in the U.S, and (2) the major products that could be produced from the technology with an estimate of the technical and economic performance targets required for commercialization of the technology.

 

 

FDA: Enhancing Innovations in Emerging Technologies for Advanced Manufacturing of Complex Biologic Products (R01) (RFA-FD-18-023)

Due June 25, 2018

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-FD-18-023.html or https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=304074

This program will make an estimated five three-year awards at up to $600,000 total each (direct and indirect) to support the application of novel technologies for advanced manufacturing of complex biologic products, and innovative analytical approaches to improve product manufacturing and quality through active research.  One such technology is continuous manufacturing, defined as manufacturing using a continuous process, rather than a batch-process approach. This emerging technology has the potential to improve agility, flexibility, cost, and robustness in the development of manufacturing processes.  In addition, CBER seeks other innovative technologies for advancing manufacturing of complex biologics such as regenerative medicine products and vaccines.

This research will advance innovative manufacturing by developing and making technologies accessible to industry in the near term, and by bridging the gap between discoveries in academia or industry and implementation by industry.  Additionally, this research is intended to support advances in regulatory science that allow for development of science and risk based guidelines to facilitate faster adoption of these innovative technologies. Some specific areas of research could include the following, but applications should clearly describe the potential impacts of the proposed enabling technology on readiness for broad implementation in the biological product industry, control strategy, and/or regulatory evaluation:

    Continuous processing equipment (e.g., bioreactors)

    Closed and automated manufacturing technologies

    Modular platforms for complex biologics manufacturing and testing

    Enhanced in-line process analytical technologies

    Integrated data management and plant-wide control systems

    Process modeling and simulation

    Advanced process control (e.g., feedback, feedforward or plant-wide control)

Letters of intent are optional and are due May 7. Full proposals are due June 25.

 

 

USDA: Sustainable Agricultural Systems (USDA-NIFA-AFRI-006553)

Letters of intent are due June 27, 2018. Full proposals are due October 10, 2018.

at https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=304081 or https://nifa.usda.gov/sites/default/files/rfa/FY-2018-AFRI-SAS.pdf

This program will make large grants, up to $10 million over five years each, to promote the sustainable supply of abundant, affordable, safe, nutritious, and accessible food and other agricultural products, while enhancing economic opportunities and improving the long-term health and well-being of all Americans. This RFA solicits applications for projects focused on increasing agricultural productivity; optimizing water and nitrogen use efficiency; protecting yield losses from stresses, diseases, and pests; reducing food-borne diseases; and advancing development of biobased fuels, chemicals, and coproducts. This RFA is soliciting creative and visionary project applications that use transdisciplinary teams and integrated research, education, and extension activities to promote convergence of science and technology to solve present and future food and agricultural production system challenges.

Projects will need to be Integrated, meaning that they must include research, education, and extension activities. There’s a certain amount of taxonomy involved in determining the type of proposal to submit. We will want to look at the “Center of Excellence” option.

 

 

NIH: Novel Nucleic Acid Sequencing Technology Development (R01) (RFA-HG-18-001)

Due June 27, 2018; June 27, 2019; and June 26, 2020. Letters of intent are requested 30 days before the proposal deadline.

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HG-18-001.html

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) solicits R01 grant applications to develop novel technologies that will enable no less than one order of magnitude improvement in DNA sequencing, and practical methods for direct RNA sequencing. Advances in genomics and more broadly in biomedical research have been greatly facilitated by significant and sustained DNA sequencing throughput increases and cost decreases. The goal now is to improve the quality and efficiency of DNA sequencing and enable direct RNA sequencing (e.g., longer read lengths, faster turn-around time, greater accuracy, and higher-throughput etc.) at reasonable costs with the anticipation that significant advances in any of these and related areas would make significant contributions to the mission of NHGRI and the field of genomics, including to many of NHGRI’s other technology development goals.

A project may request up to $700,000 direct per year. NHGRI intends to commit $1,500,000 in FY19, 20 and 21 to fund 2-4 awards yearly. The actual number of awards and amount are contingent on NIH appropriations, and the submission of a sufficient number of meritorious applications.

 

 

DOE: Affordable and Sustainable Energy Crops (ASEC) (DE-FOA-0001917)

Letter of intent due May 30, 2018; full proposals June 27, 2018

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=304685 or https://eere-exchange.energy.gov/Default.aspx

This FOA supports BETO’s main strategic goal of reducing the price of biofuels to less than $3/gasoline gallon equivalent (gge) and increasing the availability and affordability of biomass-derived transportation fuels and bioproducts. Projects selected under this FOA will generate scientific information on new varieties/cultivars of energy crops, specifically, the degree to which they show performance improvements relative to better characterized predecessor varieties, how well adapted they are across regions, whether they may be more cost‐effective to produce, and whether they can be shown to be more sustainable relative to a check variety and/or traditional cropping/pasture systems.

Projects must focus on newer, less well studied varieties/cultivars of energy crops that have not been extensively tested in the field. Applicants must propose research around energy crop genotypes/cultivars/varieties that have been developed but have not yet been brought into widespread commercial use due to a need for additional evaluation and data collection.

For the purpose of this FOA, energy crops are defined as fast‐growing, highly productive cellulosic crops that are cultivated to produce biofuels, bioproducts, and biopower from all or part of the lignocellulosic portions of the plant. Energy crops are primarily perennial species, including herbaceous grasses (e.g., switchgrass, energycane, miscanthus, mixed grasses) and short rotation woody crops (e.g., willows, hybrid poplars). However, non‐food sorghum varieties, which are grown as annual crops, are also considered to be acceptable energy crops for purposes of this FOA.

Agricultural and forestry residues (e.g., corn stover, wheat straw, rice straw, sugarcane bagasse, guayule bagasse, forest thinnings, etc.), algae, animal wastes, urban wastes, industrial wastes, and municipal solid wastes (MSW) are not acceptable feedstocks for purposes of this FOA. No plant based material that is generally intended for use as food or animal feed may be employed as a feedstock, including but not limited to sugarcane, sweet sorghum, sugar beets, and oil crops.

Projects must evaluate crop performance (i.e., yield and potential for profitability) and environmental performance over at least three (3) harvest cycles to provide empirical data on newer varieties of energy crops relative to traditional cropping and pasture systems. Required parameters to be measured include: yearly crop dry matter yield/productivity, soil quality, water quantity, water quality, efficiency of nutrient utilization, and biodiversity.

DOE expects to make 3-6 awards ranging from $2.5 million to $5 million each from a $15 million pool. Awards will run up to 60 months. Cost sharing of 20% of total project cost (i.e., 1:4) is required.

 

 

DOE: Efficient Carbon Utilization in Algal Systems( DE-FOA-0001908)

Letters of intent due May 30, 2018; full proposals June 27, 2018

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=304683 or https://eere-exchange.energy.gov/Default.aspx#FoaIdc8f7ecbf-2028-4bc5-bf40-13d640c4a081

This FOA supports research on increasing carbon utilization efficiencies as well as on developing direct air capture technologies, with the goals of increasing productivity and reducing costs. CO2 quantity, quality, availability, delivery into the system, uptake in the organism, and dispersion techniques represent some of the areas directly related to productivity and the economics of an overall algae cultivation system.

The program has two topic areas:

Topic Area 1 – CO2 Utilization within Algae Cultivation Systems: CO2 utilization within an algae cultivation system can be addressed in a number of ways. These include, but are not limited to: improving the rate of carbon fixation (for example, through improving carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs)) to increase utilization and productivity through strain development; system delivery/dispersion mechanisms (ranging from phase to bubbling and other dispersion techniques); and cultivation system improvements related to CO2 delivery and utilization. Applicants can propose the CO2 utilization area of their choice to research and develop. Please note: all applications to Topic Area 1 must focus on CO2 utilization; applications proposing projects for other than CO2 utilization within an algae cultivation system will be considered non‐responsive and will not be reviewed. For example, an application on strain development for anything other than improving carbon for increased utilization and efficiency will be considered non‐responsive.

Topic Area 2 – Direct Air Capture Systems: Direct, economic air capture for providing the CO2 source in algae cultivation to produce advanced biofuels and bioproducts has the potential to provide large cost savings. It can also lead to algae farms being decoupled from large scale CO2 sources, thereby increasing the number of sites for algae farms and the overall resource potential of algae. However, additional research is needed to develop new, innovative, and economical direct air capture technologies that are designed for algae cultivation systems. Applications under this Topic Area must include testing of the proposed technology in conjunction with an algae cultivation system, which demonstrates production of algal biomass suitable for advanced biofuels and bioproducts from the delivered CO2. Applicants must provide the baseline percentage of CO2 the direct air capture technology can provide to the algae cultivation system and must propose supplementing, at a minimum, 20% of the CO2 required for algae cultivation, from the direct air capture technology.

DOE expects to make up to 10 awards at $1.5 million to $2.5 million each from a $15 million pool. Cost sharing of 20% of total project cost (1:4) is required.

 

 

US Air Force: Assured Autonomy in Contested Environments Center of Excellence (FOA-AFRL-AFOSR-2018-0003)

White paper due June 27, 2018; full proposal August 22, 2018

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=305466

This program will make one award for up to six years at up to $6 million total for a center to extend the research capabilities of the Air Force Research Laboratory, and provide opportunities for a new generation of United States scientists and engineers to address the basic research needs of the United States Air Force.

The objective of this UCoE will require substantial cross-disciplinary scientific expertise. In order to contribute to the capability of fielding distributed, multi-agent autonomous systems capable of performing complex missions in adversarial, contested environment, synergy between researchers in dynamics & controls, computer science, and communications is expected for efforts funded by this UCoE. The desired outcomes of the effort are scientific, mathematical, and computational approaches, methods and algorithms that can provide rigorous guarantees, robustness and/or safety bounds, and/or optimal strategies for employing autonomous systems within the context of an active adversary providing a contested operating environment. The particular challenges of interest that should be addressed by the proposed UCoE are:

-- Uncertain adversarial conditions

-- Computational resources

-- Communication resources

-- Limited training data

-- Integration

To answer these challenges above, research is sought after in several areas, to be integrated into a coherent and long-term vision. The ultimate goal of the UCoE is to provide a sustainable framework of advanced and effective concepts of autonomy directly applicable to AF and DOD missions. Although proposals are not limited to them, it is envisioned that the UCoE would become a world-leader in the following research thrusts:

--  Controls & Dynamical Systems Theory

-- Physical Intelligence

-- Formal Specification & Verification with Adversarial Inputs

-- Efficient, Adaptive, Distributed Communications

The Air Force expects a multidisciplinary proposal, and a multi-institution approach is probably best. The proposal must indicate how the university center will collaborate with Air Force researchers. (This includes addressing how collaboration with non-citizens will be handled.)

White papers (10 pp) are due June 27. The Air Force will encourage or discourage a full proposal by July 11. The full proposal is due August 22.

Lewis-Burke has given us some information on other AF centers of excellence, and RED has been pulling together some information as well. There is already interest within BCOE on this.

 

 

DOD Multidisciplinary Research Program of the University Research Initiative (MURI)

White papers due June 29, 2018

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=302093

This program will make five-year awards in the $1.2M to $1.5M/year range for multi-institution, multidisciplinary projects in the topic areas below. The solicitation contains about a page of information on each topic area.

It is strongly recommended that applicants communicate with the Research Topic Chiefs regarding these issues before the submission of formal proposals. Depending on the results of the proposal evaluation, there is no guarantee that any of the proposals submitted in response to a particular topic will be recommended for funding. On the other hand, more than one proposal may be recommended for funding for a particular topic.

Office of Naval Research:

Topic 1: Fundamental Limits on Information Latency; Purdy

Topic 2: Molecularly Programmable Graphene Architecture (MPGA); Baatar

Topic 3: Identifying invariances for improved modeling and prediction of oceanographic phenomena; Harper

Topic 4: Self-Assembly for High Performance Organic Electronics; Armistead

Topic 5: Bio-inspired high-dimension control through models of cephalopod distributed information processing; McKenna

Topic 6: Active Perception and Knowledge Exploitation in Navigation and Spatial Awareness; Steinberg

Topic 7: Advanced Analytical and Computational Modeling of Arctic Sea Ice; Malek-Madani

Topic 8: Topology & Advanced Dynamics of Coupled Human/Machine Systems; Holm-Hansen

Army Research Office:

Topic 9: Clearing Your Head: The Glymphatic System and Restorative Effects of Sleep, Munson-Gregory

Topic 10: Foundations of Emergent Computation and Self-Organized Adaptation, Stanton- Baker

Topic 11: Multi-layer Network Modeling of Plant and Pollen Distribution across Space and Time, Strand-Garcia

Topic 12: Near Field Radiative Heat Energy Transfer between Nanostructured Materials, Varanasi-Ulrich

Topic 13: Networked Interactions Governing Community Dynamics, Kokoska-Garcia

Topic 14: Prediction and Control in Particulate Systems, Myers-Barzyk

Topic 15: Reactive and non-Reactive Scattering from Targeted Molecular Quantum States, Parker-Baker

Topic 16: Unified Decision Theory: From Bounded to Unbounded Rationality, Iyer-Myers

Air Force Office of Scientific Research:

Topic 17: THz Electronics Based on Antiferromagnets

Topic 18: Quantum Information Concepts from Tensor Networks and the Holographic Principle

Topic 19: 2D Heterostructures for Flexible, Lightweight Electronics and Optoelectronics

Topic 20: Feedback control and sparse neural signals

Topic 21: Dissipation Engineering in Open Quantum Systems

Topic 22: Group-IV Alloy Synthesis and Materials Properties

Topic 23: Neuromorphic Networks for Multifunctional Intelligent Systems

Topic 24: Microstructurally-aware Continuum Models for Energetic Materials

An individual may be a principal investigator of more than one proposal only with permission from the topic area chief in advance.

White papers (4 pp) are due June 29, 2018. Invitations for full proposals will come in July, and full proposals will be due October 16.

Technically, there are three solicitations: ONR # N00014-18-S-F006, ARO # W911NF18S0003, and AFOSR # FOA-AFRL-AFOSR-2018-0001

 

 

July

 

 

NSF STEM + Computing K-12 Education  (STEM+C) (PD-18-005Y)

Due July 2, 2018, for consideration in the 2017-18 fiscal year; accepted continuously after that.

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505006&WT.mc_id=USNSF_39&WT.mc_ev=click

STEM+C focuses on research and development of interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary approaches to the integration of computing within STEM teaching and learning for preK-12 students in both formal and informal settings. The STEM+C program supports research on how students learn to think computationally to solve interdisciplinary problems in science and mathematics. The program supports research and development that builds on evidence-based teacher preparation or professional development activities that enable teachers to provide excellent instruction on the integration of computation and STEM disciplines. Proposals should describe projects that are grounded in prior evidence and theory, are innovative or potentially transformative, and that will generate and build knowledge about the integration of computing and one or more STEM disciplines at the preK-12 level.  

A proposal should describe the integration of computing with one or more STEM disciplines. A proposal may focus on studies on the effects of integrating computational thinking with STEM disciplines or the challenges of implementing these potentially disruptive educational interventions. Proposed projects may develop models, assessments, and technological tools to support teaching and learning in this area as well as conduct research on these models, assessments, and tools.

Outcomes of projects should enable the Nation to have a future workforce with knowledge of computational thinking integrated with STEM disciplines, and students prepared and interested in careers in the skilled technical work force or further education and science careers.

 

 

NSF: Accelerating Discovery: Educating the Future STEM Workforce  (AD) (PD-18-1998)

Due July 2 for consideration in FY 2018; open to January 16, 2019

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505552&WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

This program will support efforts for innovative undergraduate education and innovative continuing education for the existing workforce (including graduate and postdoctoral education). All projects should develop and implement novel educational and/or training programs and simultaneously generate new knowledge about effective STEM education.

Specifically, NSF accepts proposals to support education research and development projects focused on re- or up-skilling the existing workforce; developing the skilled technical workforce; and/or preparing those at the undergraduate, graduate, or postdoctoral fellow/early career levels. We encourage projects to partner with industry, public, and private sectors to define the needs of tomorrow’s workforce and develop educational and learning strategies to meet those needs. Proposals should address near-, mid-, and long-term challenges and opportunities facing the development of STEM professionals or anticipate new structures and functions of the STEM learning and teaching enterprise. Proposers are encouraged to include approaches that have the potential to increase and diversify participation in STEM. All proposals should contribute to one or more of the six research Big Ideas.

 

 

NIH: BRAIN Initiative: Targeted BRAIN Circuits Projects (RFA-NS-18-030)

Due July 3, 2018; November 6, 2018; July 3, 2019; November 6, 2019; July 1, 2020; and November 10, 2020

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-18-030.html

This FOA solicits applications for research projects that use innovative, methodologically integrated approaches to understand how circuit activity gives rise to mental experience and behavior. The goal is to support projects that can realize a meaningful outcome within 5 years. Applications should address circuit function in the context of specific neural systems such as sensation, perception, attention, reasoning, intention, decision-making, emotion, navigation, communication or homeostasis. Projects should link theory and data analysis to experimental design and should produce predictive models as deliverables. Projects should aim to improve the understanding of circuits of the central nervous system by systematically controlling stimuli and/or behavior while actively recording and/or manipulating dynamic patterns of neural activity.  Projects can use non-human and human species, and applications should explain how the selected species offers ideal conditions for revealing general principles about the circuit basis of a specific behavior.

The proposed studies should relate to at least one of the seven major topic areas of the BRAIN 2025 report:

1. Discovering diversity: Identify and provide experimental access to the different cell types to determine their roles in the context of circuit function.

2. Maps at multiple scales: Generate structural and functional circuit diagrams that can span resolution from synapses to the whole brain.

3. The brain in action: Produce a dynamic picture of the functioning brain by developing and applying improved methods for large-scale monitoring of neural activity.

4. Demonstrating causality: Link brain activity to behavior with precise interventional tools that change neural circuit dynamics.

5. Identifying fundamental principles: Produce conceptual foundations about circuit dynamics and functional connectivity for understanding the biological basis of mental processes through development of new theoretical and data analysis tools.

6. Advancing human neuroscience: Develop innovative technologies to understand brain circuits and ensembles of circuits that inform understanding of the human brain and mechanisms for treating its disorders.

7. From BRAIN Initiative to the brain: Integrate new technological and conceptual approaches produced in Goals #1-6 to discover how dynamic patterns of neural activity are transformed into cognition, emotion, perception, and action in health and disease.

NIH expects to make 20 awards from a $15 million pool.

 

 

NIH: Research on the Mechanisms and/or Behavioral Outcomes of Multisensory Processing (PA-15-347)

Due March 5, July 5, and November 5 annually to November 2018

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-13-302.html

Several components of the National Institutes of Health have released PA-15-347, Research on the Mechanisms and/or Behavioral Outcomes of Multisensory Processing. Honestly, I don’t know whether this fits with anyone in BCOE. The program will support animal and human studies to elucidate the mechanisms and behavioral outcomes of sensory inputs.

Only certain institutes/centers in NIH are involved, and only the following research areas are of interest:

The National Institute on Aging (NIA) supports multisensory research in the context of aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases, in particular Alzheimer's disease (AD).  Topics of interest include, but are not restricted to: 1) mechanistic studies to understand changes in multisensory processing in aging or disease; 2) the interplay between multisensory processing and motor, cognitive, or affective function in aging or disease; 3) the impact of multisensory processing on daily functioning (e.g. walking, reaching, grasping, eating, swallowing, and other basic movements) , lifestyle activities (e.g. exercises, navigation, driving, dancing, art activities),  and social interactions in older adults with or without neurodegenerative diseases; 4) assessments of multisensory function as potential early detections of AD or other age-related neurodegenerative diseases; and 5) strategies or therapies to improve multisensory processing and related behaviors in aging or disease.  NIA will support both human and animal model (including invertebrate model) studies.

The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) is interested in studies that would elucidate mechanisms by which complementary or integrative approaches alter pain processing.  Subjects of interest include, but are not limited to, multisensory pain modulation associated with natural products and mind and body practices   Approaches are limited to those with documented effectiveness or currently being used in pain management.  For the purposes of this FOA, NCCIH will support basic and mechanistic research in both human and animal models but will not support efficacy/effectiveness clinical trials.

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) supports multisensory research in the context of cancer and cancer control. Topics of interest include, but are not restricted to: 1) Studies of multisensory interactions with taste that might govern healthy vs unhealthy eating, drinking, or smoking; 2) disruption of multisensory perception by cancer and cancer treatments; 3) the potential for using multisensory interactions to enhance health communications; 4) multisensory control of attention, as might be relevant in complex oncology or cancer care settings; 5) circadian and sleep-dependent influences on multisensory interactions.  NCI will support both human and animal model studies.

The National Eye Institute (NEI) supports research that addresses blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and requirements of the blind. Under this PA, NEI will accept applications investigating multisensory interaction (vision combined with additional sensory input) when the research would inform fundamental mechanisms of visual function or disease/disorder mechanisms related to loss of vision. Topics of interest include, but are not restricted to, the impact of other senses on visual perception, the impact of multisensory input on sensory substitution in the visually impaired, and multisensory strategies in low vision rehabilitation.

The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute on Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) is particularly interested in applications pertaining to rehabilitation and child development. Specifically, the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research is interested in research including but not limited to the following: to elucidate changes in the processing of sensory information including visual, auditory, mechanical (touch, pain, temperature) processes after traumatic brain injury, both in the acute stages of injury and at more chronic time points; persistent abnormalities in sensory processing that may affect cognitive processes known to be at risk after traumatic brain injury such as working memory, reading, attention, anger, sleep; changes in sensory perception after stroke that accompany common chronic conditions such as aphasia, spatial neglect, or loss of motor function; factors that lead to  “sensory stroke” or lacunar infarction, and unique approaches to rehabilitation; multisensory processing (vision, proprioception, tactile, etc.) related to the integration of prosthetic devices for functional use by people with amputations; the role of multisensory processing in autonomic dysreflexia and bowel and bladder voiding impairments following spinal cord injury; the role of multisensory processing in pain secondary to a disabling condition such as stroke, spinal cord injury, amputation, or traumatic brain injury.  The Child Development and Behavioral Branch at NICHD is interested in the research applications pertaining to the developmental aspects of multisensory processing.  NICHD will support both human and animal model studies. 

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) encourages research on multisensory integration in the context of drug abuse and addiction in humans and animal models. Research of interest includes, but is not limited to behavioral, imaging, and mechanistic neurobiological studies of integration and encoding of multisensory cues that trigger drug craving, drug-seeking and relapse; integration of multisensory information involved in reward valuation and decision-making; top-down influences on the salience of multisensory drug-related cues; the effects of drugs of abuse on multi-sensory processing; and multisensory processing of emotional and social cues in drug users or animal models of drug abuse.

The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) mission supports research in the areas of hearing, balance, smell, taste, voice, speech and language. Multisensory integration is well known to modulate some of these functions even though specific mechanisms are not yet understood well. NIDCD encourages applications where the main goal is to clarify how neuronal mechanisms underlie multisensory modulation of function within the NIDCD mission areas, in humans or animal models, with particular interest when the modulation is in the context of disorder or disease.  As examples, in humans the sense of smell begins in the nose and is carried by olfactory pathways to the cortex, while taste begins in the oral cavity and is carried by gustatory pathways to the cortex; these two separate sensations, coming from entirely different cranial nerve systems, are integrated to form the common multisensory perception of flavor. This combined percept itself can be modified further by visual and tactile stimuli such as color and smoothness, and a disorder in any of these pathways can affect appetite, nutrition and well-being.  Similarly, our sense of balance depends on inputs from the vestibular organs of the inner ear along with substantial multisensory input from somatosensory and visual systems, and multisensory reweighting is critical for balance when disorders occur in any of the contributing senses. In hearing, auditory misperception often can be improved by vision for functions like sound source localization. NIDCD support for voice, speech and language is focused on disordered processes, but here too audio-visual interactions can be important for speech perception disorders, and language and reading impairments.

The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) encourages applications that would inform fundamental mechanisms of how sensory systems impact physiological function of the dental, oral, and craniofacial complex, and, for oral health behaviors, how different sensory modalities interact with and influence one another in determining perception. Discovery of mechanisms underlying hypersensitivity of multiple sensory systems, sometimes seen in chronic pain conditions, is of interest. In particular, studies on neuropathies of craniofacial tissues including temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) and overlapping painful disorders are a high priority. NIDCR also supports research that would further the understanding of how sensory systems impact mastication and adaptations to altered dentition and oral prostheses. NIDCR seeks to further the exploration of how cognitive expectations, memories, and affective states contribute to or modify perceptual and behavioral outcomes which includes but is not limited to inputs that influence the decision to seek dental care, stimuli that impact dental fear or dental anxiety, and psychosocial adjustment to craniofacial disorders.   Applications that propose a clinical trial or study to test an intervention are not appropriate for this FOA and should instead use the R34 mechanism under the NIDCR Clinical Trials Program (NIDCR Behavioral or Social Intervention Clinical Trial Planning Grant (R34) - See more at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-14-342.html).

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) is interested in applications that focus on mechanisms of multisensory interactions at the cellular, circuit or systems level when such research would inform fundamental knowledge of neurological function or mechanisms related to understanding, treating or reversing the burden of neurological disease.  There are mechanistic interactions among sensory systems neurology, co-morbidities across sensory systems, and implications for sensory substitution for disorders and disabilities. Under this FOA, research topics of interest to NINDS include, but are not limited to: mechanisms of sensory transduction or integration of multiple sensory modalities in the normal nervous system, alterations in multisensory mechanisms in the context of neurological diseases or conditions, or mechanisms of multisensory adaptive or maladaptive plasticity or recovery of function following disease or trauma to the brain, spinal cord or peripheral nervous system.  Primary impacts of the research should inform fundamental mechanisms or disease/disorder mechanisms within the NINDS funding mission (http://www.ninds.nih.gov/about_ninds/ninds_overview.htm).  Applicants should develop specific aims to test mechanistic hypotheses which go beyond descriptive studies of multisensory phenomena.  Applications can investigate mechanisms from sensory transduction, to modality tract tracing, to nervous system recording/imaging/manipulating, to quantitative behavioral assay (i.e., psychophysics) and must contain an in vivo component.  Applications that address technology development are not appropriate and should be submitted to the appropriate bioengineering research grant opportunity (http://www.ninds.nih.gov/research/bioengineering/).  Applications that seek to develop or test therapeutics or devices for clinical use are not appropriate and should be submitted to the appropriate translational research funding opportunity http://www.ninds.nih.gov/funding/areas/translational_research/index.htm).  Applications that propose a clinical trial or study to test an intervention are not appropriate for this FOA and should instead use the R01 mechanism under the NINDS Exploratory Clinical Trials Program (See more at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-13-281.html).

The Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) will support research of scientific interest to the participating Institutes and Centers named in this announcement.  ORWH will support applications that propose comparisons between male and female subjects on the outcome measures.  

last updated 03/13/17 SS

 

 

NIH: NLM Express Research Grants in Biomedical Informatics (R01) (PAR-16-404)

Proposals accepted March 5, July 5, and November 5 annually until July 2019

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-16-404.html

. This program supports innovative research in biomedical informatics and data science. The scope of NLM's interest in the research domain of informatics is broad and interdisciplinary, developing methods and approaches in biomedical computing, data science and related information fields for application domains of health and biomedicine, including health care delivery, basic biomedical research, clinical and translational research, precision medicine, public health, biosurveillance, health information management in disasters, and similar areas. NLM defines biomedical informatics as the science of optimal representation, organization, management, integration and presentation of information relevant to human health and biology, for purposes of learning, sharing and use.

The following basic informatics problem areas demonstrate the scope of NLM's research interests:

•Information & knowledge processing, including understanding, translation or summarization of natural language in real-time or near real-time, automated assignment of metadata

•Integration of very large data sets and/or heterogeneous data types to support discovery, learning and health care

•Advanced information retrieval, knowledge discovery in very large or heterogeneous data sets, discovery mining, and other techniques for in silico discovery and research including approaches for accelerating the linkage of phenotypic and genomic information

•Incorporation of machine intelligence into knowledge tools and resources for use by health care providers, scientists and consumers

•Models of complex data, simulations, information visualization and presentation approaches to enhance decisions, learning or understanding, particularly in large and heterogeneous data sets

•Innovative approaches for ensuring accuracy, privacy and security of clinical and biomedical research data

•Support for consumer and patient engagement in understanding, accessing, sharing, protecting and using their own health data

Last updated 03/13/17 SS

 

 

Department of Defense I-Corps commercialization pilot program (W911NF-18-S-0004)

July 6, 2018

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=302943

This program supports the commercialization of innovations that have resulted from prior/current Department of Defense support.

The Innovation Corps at the Department of Defense (I-Corps @ DoD) program is an opportunity for Principal Investigators (PIs) to learn how to commercialize their discoveries / innovations. Successful applicants will receive a grant of up to $70,000 to attend a program that provides extensive training in product commercialization from industry experts and ‘serial entrepreneurs’ who have helped train over 1000 I-Corp Teams in how to bring their innovations to market. The I-Corps @ DoD program is a pilot program modeled after the National Science Foundation (NSF) I-Corps program.

To be eligible, you must have received a DoD award for basic research (so-called 6.1 money) with an expiration date of March 1, 2013, or later. If you are not sure whether your money is/was 6.1, check with your program officer.

DoD expects to make 14 1-year awards.

 

 

Defense University Research Instrumentation Program (DURIP)

Due July 6, 2018

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=301934

This program buys equipment between $50,000 and $1.5 million in support of research and training that contributes to Department of Defense priorities. Cost sharing is not required, although last year we had one agency come back and ask us to contribute because we were asking for a lot.

Proposals must be directed to the Army, Navy, or Air Force. You are allowed to submit the same proposal to more than one branch, but this requires a duplicate submission.

Vendor quotes must be included with the proposal.

 

 

NIH: Cutting Edge Informatics Tools for Illuminating the Druggable Genome (RFA-RM-18-011)

Due July 9, 2018

at https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-18-011.html

The overarching goal of this FOA is to add informatics capabilities to the Common Fund program, Illuminating the Druggable Genome IDG. The IDG consortium's purpose is to facilitate the unveiling of the functions of selected understudied proteins in the Druggable Genome using experimental and informatics approaches. Currently, this research consortium is composed of multiple Data and Resource Generation Centers (DRGCs), a Knowledge Management Center (KMC), and a Resource Dissemination and Outreach Center (RDOC).

The purpose of this specific FOA is to solicit applications to build a set of Cutting Edge Informatics Tools (CEITs) that will augment the capability of the KMC as well as the broader IDG Consortium in the following ways: (1) by developing and deploying tools to enhance the community's ability to process, analyze, and visualize IDG data, (2) to prioritize new data resources and methods to be incorporated into Pharos https://pharos.nih.gov/idg/index that will strengthen predictions about physiological and disease associations around the understudied proteins, and (3) by developing methods to prioritize understudied IDG families (non-olfactory GPCRs, protein kinases, and ion channels) for deeper study using experimental assays both within the IDG pipeline or by the larger community.

 

 

DOE/Israel collaborations in energy

Summaries due July 9, full proposals August 21, 2018

http://www.birdf.com/bird-energy-call-proposals/ or https://www.energy.gov/eere/articles/energy-department-invites-us-companies-submit-joint-us-israel-energy-proposals

The U.S. Department of Energy, the Israel Ministry of Energy, and the BIRD Foundation have announced the latest round of a joint program to support collaborative projects in renewable energy, energy efficiency, solar power, wind power, advanced vehicle technologies, alternative fuels, smart grids, storage, water-energy nexus, and advanced manufacturing. Projects must involve cooperation between two companies or cooperation between a company and a university/research institution – one from the US and one from Israel.

The maximum award is US$1 million.

 

 

NSF Instrument Development for Biological Research (IDBR) (NSF 13-561)

Due July 31, 2013, July 25, 2014, and the last Friday in July annually after that

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2013/nsf13561/nsf13561.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_179

This program will make 10-12 Type A awards and 5 Type B awards from a $4 million pool for projects to develop new capabilities in biological research.

TYPE A - Innovation: Proposals for the development of novel instrumentation that provides new research capabilities or, where appropriate, that significantly improves current technologies by at least an order of magnitude in fundamental aspects such as accuracy, precision, resolution, throughput, flexibility, portability, breadth of application, costs of construction or operation, or user-friendliness.

TYPE B - Bridging: Proposals for transforming, ‘one of a kind' prototypes or high-end instruments into devices that are broadly available and utilizable without loss of capacity.

All proposals must include a strong dissemination plan discussing how you will share information about the instrumentation and, especially for Type B, how you will arrange for the research community to gain access to it. Partnering with industry is encouraged. Your dissemination plan also can include plans to start or team up with small companies to develop the concept using follow-on SBIR/STTR grants.

The solicitation also points out a similar program in the chemical sciences, Chemical Measurement and Imaging, PD 09-6880, http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=503413&org=CHE&from=home, due in October.

 

 

Naval Research Laboratory Broad Agency Announcement (N00173-17-S-BA01)

https://www.nrl.navy.mil/doing-business/contracting-division/baa/current

or https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=292151

Open indefinitely, released March 2, 2017

The Naval Research Laboratory has refreshed its Broad Agency Announcement, now known as BAA-N00173-17-S-BA01. White papers on any of the topics listed below will be accepted at any time. Full proposals will be invited.

Code 6000 Materials Science and Component Technology Directorate

Code 6040 - Laboratories for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics

60-17-01  HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING ON MASSIVELY PARALLEL ARCHITECTURES 

Code 6100 - Chemistry Division

61-17-01  POWER SOURCE MATERIALS AND SYSTEMS

61-17-02 CORROSION PROCESSES, CONTROL, MITIGATION, AND TECHNOLOGY

61-17-03  DEVELOPMENT OF MICROSENSORS AND MICROSYSTEMS FOR PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL, AND BIOCHEMICAL APPLICATIONS

61-17-04 APPLICATIONS OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY, BIOCHEMISTRY, ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY AND ADVANCED LASER TECHNIQUES

61-17-05  DEVELOPMENT OF DISTINGUISHING MARKS ON FLEXIBLE SUBSTRATES 

Code 6300 - Materials Science and Technology Division

63-17-01 MATERIALS PERFORMANCE, PROCESSING AND MODELING

Code 6700 - Plasma Physics Division

67-17-01 BASIC AND APPLIED RESEARCH IN HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMAS

Code 6800 - Electronics Science and Technology Division

68-17-01  RF VACUUM ELECTRONICS       

68-17-02 RADIATION EFFECTS RESEARCH

68-17-03 PHOTOVOLTAICS FOR PORTABLE POWER

68-17-04 ANALOG AND MIXED SIGNAL INTEGRATED CIRCUIT DESIGN AND CHARACTERIZATION

Code 6900 - Center for Biomolecular Sci and Engineering Division

69-17-01 RESEARCH IN BIO-MOLECULAR SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

OCEAN AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY DIRECTORATE  - CODE 7000 TOPICS

Code 7100 - Acoustics Division

71-17-01 ACOUSTIC SIMULATION, MEASUREMENTS AND TACTICS

Code 7200 - Remote Sensing Division

72-17-01 LOW FREQUENCY RADIO INTERFEROMETRY

72-17-02  OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF THE COASTAL REGIME

72-17-03  REMOTE SENSORS AND IMAGING SYSTEMS

Code 7300 - Oceanography Division

73-17-01 OCEAN DYNAMICS AND PREDICTION OCEANOGRAPHY

Code 7400 - Marine Geosciences Division

74-17-01 AIRBORNE, SHIPBOARD, AND OVERHEAD DATA ACQUISITION AND ANALYSIS

74-17-02 SEAFLOOR SCIENCES

74-17-03  GEOSPATIAL SCIENCES AND TECHNOLOGY

Code 7500 - Marine Meteorology Division

75-17-01  ATMOSPHERIC EFFECTS, ANALYSIS, AND PREDICTION

Code 7600 - Space Science Division

76-17-01  RESEARCH INTO SPACE, BACKGROUNDS, IMAGING AND MODELING

NAVAL CENTER FOR SPACE TECHNOLOGY- CODE 8000 TOPICS

Code 8200 - Spacecraft Engineering Department

82-17-01  SPACE AND SPACE SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY

 

 

NIH: Environmental Exposures and Health: Exploration of Non-Traditional Settings (R21 Clinical Trial Optional) (PA-18-160)

Due March 16, July 16, and November 16 through July 2019

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-18-160.html

The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is to encourage interdisciplinary research aimed at promoting health, preventing and limiting symptoms and disease, and reducing health disparities across the lifespan for those living or spending time in non-traditional settings (i.e. playgrounds and nursing homes).  These settings result in exposure to environmental pollutants and toxins that result in health risks, symptoms, and other health conditions/diseases; including lower respiratory disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, and complex environmental exposures that may be exacerbated by non-chemical stressors encountered in community settings, physiological function of organs and systems of the fetus/child/adolescence, and lower respiratory disease.  Risk identification and symptom management include prevention and behavior changes and actions to maintain health and prevent disease with an emphasis on the individual, family, and community which will advance nursing science.  For purposes of this FOA, non-traditional settings include, but are not limited to, places such as community centers; pre-school and non-traditional school environments (e.g., churches, daycare, home-based schools, dormitories, alternative schools, and playgrounds); child and older adult foster care facilities; older adult day care facilities; half-way homes; and  assisted living and long-term care facilities.

 

 

NIH: Applying Metabolomics to Drive Biomarker Discovery in Symptom Science (R21 Clinical Trial Optional) (PA-18-158)

Due March 16, July 16, and November 16, 2018

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-18-158.html

The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement is to encourage applications on biomarker discovery that utilize metabolomics approaches to advance the understanding, assessment and management of symptoms.

Research projects of interest include, but are not limited to, those that address:

-- Identification of biomarkers of symptoms, including fatigue, impaired sleep, pain, nausea, dyspnea, and cognitive impairment, using metabolomic approaches

--Application of metabolite profiling and biomarker discovery tools to discriminate symptomatic from asymptomatic individuals, differing symptoms, and/or varying symptoms experienced by individuals with similar conditions/illnesses

-- Influence of particular metabolite profiles in combination with genetic variants on symptom risk, management and response to treatment

-- Assessment of biomarkers as gleaned from metabolomic approaches to facilitate personalized health strategies for symptom management

This FOA focuses on both preclinical and clinical research.  The NIH recognizes that certain studies may be restricted to animal or cell line models at present because appropriate human research models are not available, or human studies are otherwise not feasible. For acute or chronic conditions that cannot be pursued in human tissues, applicants may propose to work in mammalian models or cell lines, but must provide a specific rationale for why the use of these model systems is essential to further the understanding of symptom science.

Interdisciplinary collaborations that include nurse scientists in the project team are strongly encouraged. Additionally, applicants should consider engaging the resources and expertise of NIH-supported Regional Comprehensive Metabolomics Resource Cores and/or other federally-funded research centers as feasible to facilitate the proposed research.

The evolution and vitality of the biomedical sciences require a constant infusion of new ideas, techniques, and points of view. These may differ substantially from current thinking or practice and may not yet be supported by substantial preliminary data. By using the R21 mechanism, the NIH seeks to foster the introduction of novel scientific ideas, model systems, tools, agents, targets, and technologies that have the potential to substantially advance biomedical research. 

 

 

NSF: Leading Engineering for America's Prosperity, Health, and Infrastructure (LEAP HI) (17-602)

LOI December 15, 2017, proposal February 20, 2018

LOI July 16, 2018, proposal September 17, 2018

LOI July 15 annually after that, proposal September 15 annually after that.

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17602/nsf17602.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

The National Science Foundation, Division of Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation (CMMI), has released Program Solicitation 17-602, Leading Engineering for America's Prosperity, Health, and Infrastructure (LEAP HI). This program will make 4-7 awards per year at $1 million to $2 million each for multi-investigator fundamental research projects that articulate a fundamental research problem with compelling intellectual challenge and significant societal impact, particularly on economic competitiveness, quality of life, public health, or essential infrastructure. The problem must be within CMMI’s core areas, which are articulated at https://www.nsf.gov/funding/programs.jsp?org=CMMI.

Proposals must involve multiple investigators (and a supplementary document, Research Integration Plan, justifying the mix of expertise), but engineering must be at the head. There is no limit on the number of proposals per institution, but an individual may be involved in only one proposal.

 

 

ONR: Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM), Education and Workforce Program (N00014-18-S-F003)

White papers are mandatory and will be accepted between April 2 and July 31, 2017. Full proposals will be due September 28, 2018

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=298739

This program will make an estimated 25 grants of up to $250,000 per year for three years for projects that improve the STEM training of students and/or professionals in fields important to the Navy.

The education initiative should address at least one of these audiences:

• Secondary education communities;

• Post-Secondary communities;

• Informal science communities;

• Current naval STEM workforce communities.

The technical content of any idea must establish naval relevance within the priority areas as outlined in the “Naval Research and Development Framework and Addendum”, https://www.onr.navy.mil/our-research/naval-research-framework. Broad priority areas are as follows:

• Augmented Warfighter

• Integrated & Distributed Forces

• Operational Endurance

• Sensing & Sense-Making

• Scalable Lethality

With some help from friends at the Surface Warfare Center in Corona, we won a grant from this program a year or two ago to enhance our undergraduate curriculum in navigation.

 

 

DHHS Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) Broad Agency Announcement (BAA-18-100-SOL-00003)

White papers accepted on the following dates. Full proposals are by invitation.

January 31, 2018

April 30, 2018

July 31, 2018

October 31, 2018

January 31, 2019

April 30, 2019

July 31, 2019

October 31, 2019

https://www.fbo.gov/index?tab=documents&tabmode=form&subtab=core&tabid=b2747f53ddac30d9b00e1ff205ffee0f

Area of Interest #1: CBRN Vaccines

1.1. Anthrax and Smallpox

1.2 Sudan ebolavirus and Marburg virus

1.3 Expansion of availability of licensed anthrax and smallpox vaccines to at risk populations

Area of Interest #2: Antitoxins and Therapeutic Proteins

2.1 Development of peptide or small molecule antitoxins, and other novel compounds, with innovative formulations offering enhanced long-term stability.

2.2 Development of antibody treatments and other therapeutic agents for viral hemorrhagic fevers viruses

2.3 Development of antibody treatments and other therapeutic agents against smallpox.

Area of Interest #3: Antibacterials

3.1 Develop and test antibacterial products that are in development for post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) and treatment efficacy against one or more of the following biodefense threat agents

3.2 Develop new small molecule drugs that treat or prevent resistant bacterial infections either alone or in combination with other therapeutics

3.3 Develop non-traditional antibacterial therapeutics that treat or prevent resistant infections

Area of Interest #4: Radiological/Nuclear Threat Medical Countermeasures

4.1 Advanced Development of MCMs to treat radiation injury due to acute exposure to ionizing radiation

4.2 Blood Products

4.3 Decorporation Agents

Area of Interest #5: Chemical Threat Medical Countermeasures

5.1 Pulmonary Agents

5.2 Vesicants

5.3 Blood/Metabolic Agents

5.4 Nerve Agents and Organophosphorus (OP) Pesticides

5.5. Novel MCM Delivery Mechanisms

Area of Interest #6: Burn Medical Countermeasures

6.1 Products to prevent or control burn wound conversion

6.2 Smart imaging systems

6.3 Products promoting wound closure

6.4 Products for temporizing burn injuries

6.5 Countermeasures for Cutaneous Radiation Injuries (CRI)

6.6 Products for treatment of inhalation injuries

Area of Interest #7: Diagnostics

7.1 Diagnostic Innovations

7.2 Biothreat Agent Diagnostics

7.3 Antibiotic Resistance Diagnostics for priority bacterial pathogens

7.4 Radiation exposure (Biodosimetry) Diagnostics

7.5 Chemical Threat Diagnostics

7.6 Influenza Diagnostics

7.7 Emerging Diseases Diagnostics

7.8 Hardware/Software platform development or improvement

Area of Interest #8: Influenza and Emerging Infectious Diseases (IEID) Vaccines

8.1 Advanced development of more effective vaccines
8.1 Advanced development of more effective vaccines

Area of Interest #9: Influenza and Emerging Infectious Diseases (IEID) Therapeutics

9.1 Influenza Therapeutics

9.2 Emerging Infectious Disease Therapeutics

9.3 Immunomodulators

9.4 Innovative approaches to improve clinical trial execution for hospitalized influenza patients

Area of Interest #10: Respiratory Protective Devices

10.1 Development and characterization of improved respiratory protective devices (RPD)

Area of Interest #11: Ventilators

11.1 Advanced development of new or improved ventilators to provide respiratory support in clinical care, transport, and emergency use settings

Area of Interest #12: MCM Production Platform Systems

12.1 Monoclonal Antibody Platform

12.2 Vaccine Production Platform

Area of Interest #13: Modeling as an Enabling Technology for Influenza, Emerging Infectious Disease, and CBRN Threats

13.1 Pioneering capabilities to flexibly identify and quantify needs for medical countermeasures

13.2 Adaptable capabilities to target improvements to operationalizing medical countermeasures

13.3 Reliable situational awareness to support nimble and effective BARDA response during man-made and naturally occurring public health incidents

13.4 Robust analytic capabilities to innovatively support improvements in medical countermeasure advanced development, testing, and evaluation

Area of Interest #14: Visual Analytics an Enabling Technology for Influenza, Emerging Infectious Disease, and CBRN Threats

14.1 Discovery through data visualization

14.2 Capabilities to enhance medical countermeasure development by leveraging immersive visualization

14.3 Innovative techniques and capabilities for data visualization to support medical countermeasure decision-making during preparedness and in a response

 

 

NSF: Smart and Autonomous Systems (18-557)

due July 31, 2018, June 3, 2019, and June 1, 2020

https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?WT.z_pims_id=505325&ods_key=nsf18557

. S&AS focuses on Intelligent Physical Systems (IPS) that are capable of robust, long-term autonomy requiring minimal or no human operator intervention in the face of uncertain, unanticipated, and dynamically changing situations. IPS are systems that combine perception, cognition, communication, and actuation to operate in the physical world. Examples include, but are not limited to, robotic platforms, self-driving vehicles, underwater exploration vehicles, and smart grids.

There are two classes of awards (revised from last time):

Foundational (10-15 awards expected at $300,000 to $600,000 total over up to three years): projects focus on research into algorithms and technologies that directly support a specific characteristic or component of IPS. While Foundational investigations are not required to utilize a physical testbed, they must engage in an evaluation designed to demonstrate direct relevance of the research to some IPS.

Integrative (5-10 awards expected at $500,000 to $1 million total over up to four years): projects focus on integrating two or more components of IPS into increasingly smart and autonomous systems. Integrative projects should have longer-term vision, with objectives that could not be attained simply by a collection of smaller projects provided with similar resources. Integrative projects must include rigorous evaluation of physical systems, preferably in real-world settings. This evaluation should follow the scientific methodology, including statement of the formal hypotheses, controlled experiments, evaluation metrics, and statistical analyses of the results. Integrative projects are encouraged to have multiple PIs, preferably from different disciplines.

An individual may be involved in up to two proposals per year.

 

 

August

 

 

NSF: Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) (17-565)

Due September 5, 2017, and August 8, 2018

https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf17565

This is revised from previous years. The program supports research on the design, development, implementation, and selective spread of innovative strategies for engaging students in technology-rich experiences that: (1) increase student awareness of STEM occupations; (2) motivate students to pursue appropriate education pathways to STEM occupations; or (3) develop disciplinary-based knowledge and practices, or promote critical thinking, reasoning skills, or communication skills needed for entering STEM workforce sectors.

There are three classes of awards:

Exploratory Projects: ITEST Exploratory projects advance theory and generate evidence to inform the design and development of strategies for achieving desired learning outcomes. Exploratory projects may examine factors associated with new innovations, or they may examine modifications of existing practices to promote outcomes associated with advancing STEM workforce objectives. In either case, the research should focus on elucidating the associations among learning experiences or environments and desired learning outcomes, identifying malleable factors that influence outcomes, or identifying factors or conditions that moderate learning outcomes.

Exploratory projects can be up to two years in duration with a maximum award size of $400,000. The size and duration of the request should be appropriate to the scope of the project.

Strategies Projects: The goal of ITEST Strategies projects is to design, implement, and study innovative interventions that support PreK-12 student engagement in relevant learning experiences that: (1) incorporate the skills, knowledge, and practices associated with STEM occupations; and (2) generate student awareness of, interests in, or capacities to participate in STEM occupations or education pathways leading to those occupations. Strategies projects may also devise ways to provide teachers with the appropriate resources to ensure students consider and are prepared for entering the STEM workforce. Strategies projects are expected to contribute to STEM education knowledge about the design and implementation of effective interventions as well as about future research activities.

Strategies proposals are expected to draw on existing theory and evidence to design and iteratively develop interventions or strategies, including testing of individual components to provide feedback in the development process. Strategies projects can include pilot tests of fully developed interventions to determine whether they achieve intended outcomes under varying contexts and conditions. Results should reveal understandings about how and which aspects of the project are effective in motivating and engaging students in STEM learning, career awareness, or persistence in STEM endeavors.

Strategies projects can be up to three years in duration with a maximum award size of $1,200,000. The size and duration of the request should be appropriate to the scope of the project.

Successful Project Expansion and Dissemination (SPrEaD) Projects: The goal of ITEST SPrEaD projects is to support the further development of successful innovative interventions across a wider range of contexts and settings. To this end, ITEST accepts proposals for developed interventions having evidence of strong theoretical and empirical support that can be expanded in order to determine whether they achieve intended outcomes under varying contexts and conditions. Where appropriate, SPrEaD projects document factors that may enhance, moderate, or constrain the effects of strategies designed to promote student knowledge of, or dispositions toward, STEM education programs and occupations. Programmatically, the ITEST program accumulates information from SPrEaD projects to inform the larger ITEST community's efforts to build and inform future implementation research and impact studies.

 

 

NSF CISE Research Initiation Initiative (18-554)

Due August 8, 2018; August 14, 2019; and the second Wednesday in August after that

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2018/nsf18554/nsf18554.htm

This is sort of a mini CAREER grant, up to $175,000 per year for two years, and it is intended to be a PI’s first federal  award (not just first NSF award).

To be eligible, the PI must meet all of these qualifications:

-- Hold a primary appointment in computer and/or information science and/or engineering, or in a related field of computational or data science (where the PI would normally submit proposals to CISE programs);

-- Be untenured; and

-- Be in the first three years of a tenure-track or research science or education position (or equivalent).

-- Not have received any other federal grant as PI as of the proposal due date except for workshop or student conference travel awards; doctoral dissertation improvement grants; postdoctoral research fellowship awards, such as SEES Fellows or CI Fellows; a Graduate Research Fellowship or similar fellowship award from NSF; REU or RET awards; or SBIR or STTR awards that were received while the PI worked in industry.

You may not submit a CRII proposal in the same calendar year that you submit a CAREER proposal. You may submit only one CRII proposal per year, and you are allowed up to two tries. NSF expects to make 55-60 awards per year.

The budget must include at least 0.5 month per year of summer salary for the PI and at least one graduate student for two years. No co-PIs or other senior personnel are allowed.

A department chair letter is required. Since this is due in the middle of the summer, let’s be sure that your department chair will be accessible.

 

 

NSF International Research Experiences for Students (12-551)       

Due August 18, 2015 and third Tuesday in August, annually thereafter

http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?WT.z_pims_id=12831&ods_key=nsf12551

The National Science Foundation has released Program Solicitation 12-551, International Research Experiences for Students (IRES). This changes and updates the previous IRES program.

IRES will support projects that provide international research opportunities to undergraduate and/or graduate students. Ideally, the students should be working within an established collaboration between the U.S. faculty advisor and the foreign collaborator, but new collaborations can be proposed, too. This year, for the first time, you can also propose to include teachers as trainees (talk to your program officer before proposing this). Each year, the students going overseas must have a “cohort” experience of being together as a team to prepare for the experience and to carry out the research at the foreign location.

The significant changes from the past:

1. The number of IRES competitions and award cycles per year is reduced from two to one, but this change is not intended to reduce the size of the program. A PI can submit only one proposal per year. There is no limit on the number of proposals per institution per year.

2. Principal Investigator and/or other U.S. administrative support salary has been added as an allowable expense, within a maximum allowable limit of $15,000 per year of the project.

3. This solicitation specifies that all projects must be of exactly three years' duration and send no fewer than three student cohorts abroad.

4. The maximum allowable budget per project is raised from $150,000 to $250,000 and the previous annual budget limit of $50,000 is removed entirely. Removal of the annual budget cap provides more project flexibility, but projects are still required to send a student cohort abroad in each of the three years of the project.

5. Language has been added that student participants "must" be US Citizens or Permanent Residents.

6. Language has been changed and/or added to strengthen the emphasis on more thorough recruitment and preparation of student participants, engagement of foreign research mentorship, high-quality research experiences coupled with appropriate support of US students in the foreign location, and post-experience follow-up for students' career enhancement and networking purposes.

7. Explicit IRES program considerations to be used in the review and ranking of proposals have been added.

8. The Doctoral Dissertation Enhancement Program (DDEP) has been removed from this solicitation.

9. Research Experience for Teachers (RET) has been added.

 

 

September

 

 

NIH: Assay development and screening for discovery of chemical probes or therapeutic agents (R01) (PAR-17-438)

Letters of intent due 30 days before proposal due date. Proposals due February 5, June 5, October 5 annually to September 2020

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-17-438.html

This program will support three stages of discovery research – assay development, primary screen implementation, and hit validation – with the aim of making the following improvements:

-- First, increased rigor in target identification is necessary. For instance, whether prior studies of the selected target were adequately controlled and powered are important considerations. Were cell lines verified, plasmids sequenced, and protein reagents tested for contaminants?

-- Second, reproducibility of the proposed primary assay should be carefully considered because this assay is often the basis for assessing not only initial hits, but also for iteratively assessing optimized hits during structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies. Development of primary screening assays that test a key biological function of the target of interest are likely to yield hits of increased relevance. In this respect, phenotypic screens have had a resurgence.

-- Third, a hit validation scheme or “critical path” that includes orthogonal assay(s) to eliminate false positives, as well as a series of assays in diverse biological systems with diverse read-outs, particularly including assays that model human disease, is likely to yield hits of increased relevance.

-- Fourth, inclusion of skilled synthetic and/or medicinal chemists to assess the validity of the hit chemotypes to eliminate PAINS (pan-assay interference compounds) or other undesirable chemotypes.

-- A final area for improvement is the optimization of hits to yield high quality probes. Technological innovations in high throughput screening, chemical synthesis, and cheminformatics have allowed rapid discovery of novel, small-molecule probes for the study of disease related biological processes and mechanisms in academic environments (see Academic Screening Facilities Directory; Academic Drug Discovery Consortium). The Chemical Probes Portal, established in July 2015, provides a list of credentialed probes. It is noted that probes may be the predecessors of drugs, but drugs with known off-target effects are seldom useful as probes of specific biological activities. Importantly, identification of chemical probe(s) for a given target provides an unprecedented opportunity for investigators to translate knowledge about diseases into tangible tools for translational research and opens the door to validation of the target prior to clinical testing.

The agencies sponsoring this program – NCI, NIAID, NIDA, and NIDCD – have specific areas of interest. Please review those closely before starting on a proposal.

 

 

BRAIN Initiative: Biology and Biophysics of Neural Stimulation (R01 Clinical Trial Optional) (RFA-NS-18-018)

Proposals are due February 23, 2018, June 6, 2018, October 4, 2018, February 6, 2019, June 4, 2019, October 4, 2019, February 6, 2020, June 4, 2020, and October 6, 2020. Letters of intent are due 30 days before the due dates.

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-18-018.html

This program will support projects seeking to develop new and improved perturbation technologies suitable for controlling specified cell types and circuits to modulate function in the central nervous system. This FOA seeks applications to systematically characterize, model, and validate the membrane, cellular, circuit, and adaptive-biological responses of neuronal and non-neuronal cells to various types of stimulation. Development of new technologies and therapies, as well as of disease models are outside the scope of this FOA. However, activities related to combining multiple recording modalities are allowed. As part of this program, investigators will be required to participate in a consortium to develop standards and model systems for the evaluation of current and next generation neuromodulation technologies.

NIH expects to make 5-10 awards from a $5M/year pool. The maximum budget period is 5 years.

 

 

NSF: Mathematical Biology (PD 18-7334)

Due September 5 annually

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5690

This program supports research in areas of applied and computational mathematics with relevance to the biological sciences.  Successful proposals are mathematically innovative and address challenging problems of interest to members of the biological community.

Some projects of interest to the Mathematical Biology Program may include development of mathematical concepts and tools traditionally seen in other disciplinary programs within the Division of Mathematical Sciences, e.g., topology, probability, statistics, computational mathematics, etc.  To receive appropriate and timely review, such proposals should be submitted directly to the relevant disciplinary program that has the earliest deadline, with other program(s) selected as secondary.  Note that proposals that use established mathematical and computational tools to address problems in the biological sciences are typically not appropriate for submission to DMS.  For further details on other disciplinary programs within DMS, see the corresponding program descriptions.

In general, if a proposal is appropriate for review by more than one NSF program, it is advisable to contact the program officers handling each program to determine when the proposal should be submitted and to facilitate the review process.  Usually, it is most appropriate to submit in line with the earliest program deadline.

The Mathematical Biology Program regularly seeks joint reviews of proposals with programs in the Directorates of Biological Sciences and Engineering.  Investigators are encouraged to discuss their project with program officers in relevant areas to determine if it should be submitted to more than one program.

 

 

NSF: Science of Science and Innovation Policy (PD 9-7626)

Due February 9 and September 9 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=501084&org=NSF&sel_org=NSF&from=fund

The Science of Science & Innovation Policy (SciSIP) program supports research designed to advance the scientific basis of science and innovation policy.  The program funds research to develop models, analytical tools, data and metrics that can be applied in the science policy decision making process and concern the use and allocation of scarce scientific resources.

 

 

NIH Director's New Innovator Award Program (DP2 - Clinical Trial Optional) (RFA-RM-18-008)

Due September 10, 2018

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-18-008.html

This program supports early stage investigators of exceptional creativity who propose highly innovative new research approaches with the potential to produce a major impact on broad, important problems in biomedical or behavioral research.

Applicants must meet the definition of an Early Stage Investigator (ESI) at the time of application. An ESI is a new investigator (defined as a PD/PI who has not competed successfully for a significant NIH independent research award) who is within 10 years of completing his/her terminal research degree or end of post-graduate clinical training. An extension to the 10-year period may be granted under special circumstances (e.g., family care responsibilities, extended periods of clinical training, disability or illness, etc.). Applicants must hold an independent research position at a domestic (U.S.) institution by September 1, 2019.

The NIH Director's New Innovator Award addresses two important goals: stimulating highly innovative research and supporting promising Early Stage Investigators. Early Stage Investigators may have exceptionally innovative research ideas, but not the preliminary data required to fare well in the traditional NIH peer review system. It is designed specifically to support unusually creative investigators with highly innovative research ideas at an early stage of their career. The emphasis is on innovation and creativity; preliminary data are not required, but may be included. No detailed, annual budget is requested in the application. The review process emphasizes the individual’s creativity, the innovativeness of the research approaches, and the potential of the project, if successful, to have a significant impact on an important biomedical or behavioral research problem.

 

 

US-Israel Binational Agricultural Foundation 2018-19

Various deadlines from September 2018 to January 2019

http://www.bard-isus.com

The US-Israel Binational Agricultural Research and Development Fund has released its 2018-19 program. BARD supports mission-oriented

cooperative agricultural research projects of mutual interest to the United States and Israel. Proposals are expected to deal with an agricultural issue or problem and yield tangible results that could be implemented within a reasonable time after completion of the project.

NIFA-BARD, due July 15. UCR does not have any NIFA awards eligible for this program.

BARD Research Programs, due September 12. BARD projects, conducted cooperatively by American and Israeli scientists, cover all phases of agricultural research and development, including integrated projects and strategic or applied research. Cooperative research entails active collaboration between Israeli and American scientists. The following research areas were identified by the Board of Directors as top priorities for the coming years:

-- Increased Efficiency of Agricultural Production

-- Protection of Plants and Animals Against Biotic and Abiotic Stress

-- Food Quality, Safety and Security

-- Water Quality & Quantity

-- Functional Genomics and Proteomics

-- Sensors and Robotics

-- Sustainable Bio-Energy Systems

Award duration: 3 years. One year feasibility studies are also funded.

Maximum award: $310,000 for a 3-year grant.

Postdoc, due September 15. The Vaadia-BARD Postdoctoral Fellowship program is designed to identify and support young scientists who will eventually become leaders in agricultural sciences and technologies in universities and research institutes in the United States and Israel. The primary objective of the fellowship is to enable these young scientists to acquire new skills and techniques while becoming professionally established in the agricultural research community. The program promotes cooperative agricultural research between postdoctoral fellows from one country (the United States or Israel) and established scientists from the other. Recipients will travel to the host country to carry out their research. BARD gives preference to applicants with innovative research topics that are relevant to agricultural issues.

Award duration: One year; successful applicants, with the agreement of their mentor, become eligible for a second year of funding wherein the funding is shared on a matching basis between BARD and the host lab.

Award amount: $37,000 including travel expenses + $8,000 dependant allowance.

Senior Research, due January 15, 2019. The objective of the senior Research Fellowship is to promote cooperative agricultural research between established scientists from the United States and hosts from Israel. Such fellowships should provide BARD and its scientists with input into advanced research areas and enhance scientific cooperation.

Award duration: Two to twelve months.

Award amount: $3,000 per month plus a onetime allocation of $2,000 for travel.

Graduate Student, due January 15, 2019. Purpose: To enable Ph.D. students in one country (the United States or Israel) to travel to the other country (Israel or the United States) in order to acquire new skills and techniques in their field of study. The exchange will promote collaboration between scientists of both countries and expose the student to the ongoing research in the other county in the area of his/her present and future research.

Award period: Two to six months.

Award amount: $1500 per month and $2000 to cover travel costs.

Workshops, due January 15, 2019. The purpose of the BARD workshop is to identify research needs in areas of new development, to define directions and opportunities regarding contemporary agricultural needs and provide information needed to address policy issues. The workshop is intended to promote increased contact between BARD scientists and other scientists throughout the world who work in academic and industrial communities in areas related to the binational agricultural interests of BARD.

Scientists affiliated with public or private non-profit research institutions in the United States and Israel are eligible to apply.

Cooperation: BARD workshops are a cooperative effort of scientists from both the United States and Israel. The proposal is to be submitted jointly, by at least one scientist from each country.

Award amount: Varies: $20,000 to $45,000.

 

 

 

NSF Geography and Spatial Sciences Program (14-537)

Proposals due first Thursday of September annually

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2014/nsf14537/nsf14537.htm

The goals of the NSF Geography and Spatial Sciences (GSS) Program are

•To promote scientific research in geography and the spatial sciences that advances theory and basic understanding and that addresses the challenges facing society.

•To promote the integration of geographers and spatial scientists in interdisciplinary research.

•To promote education and training of geographers and spatial scientists in order to enhance the capabilities of current and future generations of researchers.

•To promote the development and use of scientific methods and tools for geographic research.

 

 

NSF International Research Experiences for Students (IRES) (18-505)

Track 1: January 30, 2018; September 11, 2018; second Tuesday in September annually after that.

Track 2: February 6, 2018; September 18, 2018; third Tuesday in September annually after that.

Track 3: February 13, 2018; September 25, 2018; fourth Tuesday in September annually after that.

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=12831

This program will make three classes of awards:

Track I: IRES Sites (IS) projects engage a group of undergraduate and/or graduate students in active high quality collaborative research at an international site with mentorship from researchers at a host lab. IRES Sites must be organized around a coherent intellectual theme that may involve a single discipline or multiple disciplines funded by NSF.

20-25 awards expected at up to $300,000; especially creative proposals can get up to $400,000.

 

Track II: Advanced Studies Institutes (ASI) are intensive short courses with related activities that engage advanced graduate students in active learning and research at the frontiers of knowledge. ASIs typically range in length from ten to twenty-one days and must be held outside the United States. ASIs must have a compelling rationale for their international location and should involve distinguished active researchers in the target field from the U.S. and abroad. ASIs should enable students to develop skills and broaden professional networks, leveraging international participation and complementary resources (expertise, facilities, data, field site, etc.) for mutual benefit. 10-12 awards expected, $150,000 per award maximum.

Track III: New Concepts in International Graduate Experience (IGE) projects propose, implement, and evaluate creative ideas for catalyzing the development of globally engaged U.S. scientists and engineers at the graduate student level. The IGE IRES track invites professional societies and organizations in the U.S. directly associated with science and engineering education or research activities to propose innovative large-scale programs to provide high-quality international research and/or research-related professional development experiences for U.S. graduate students as individuals or groups. The proposed experiences should enhance transferable skills and expand professional networks. Graduate students recruited from a broad, diverse applicant pool should travel to non-U.S. locations for periods of several weeks to a semester for immersive experiences under the mentorship of appropriate collaborators in the U.S. and foreign locations. The proposed international professional development model may focus on research or research-related activities in any NSF-funded area(s). Proposals that utilize, leverage and potentially expand existing global networks and infrastructure are encouraged. 3-5 awards expected, up to $1 million per award.

There is no limit on the number of proposals per institution, but an individual may be involved in only one IRES proposal per year.

 

 

NIH Director's Pioneer Award (RFA-RM-18-007)

Due September 14, 2018

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-18-007.html

This program supports individual scientists of exceptional creativity who propose highly innovative and potentially transformative approaches to major challenges in the biomedical or behavioral sciences towards the goal of enhancing human health. Applications from individuals with diverse backgrounds and in any topic relevant to the broad mission of NIH are welcome. To be considered pioneering, the proposed research must reflect substantially different scientific directions from those already being pursued in the investigator’s research program or elsewhere. The NIH Director’s Pioneer Award is a component of the High-Risk, High-Reward Research program of the NIH Common Fund.

Awards are up to $700,000 per year (direct costs) for up to five years. NIH expects to make seven awards.

There is no limit on the number of proposals an institution can submit. A PI is limited to one proposal.

 

 

NSF: Dynamics, Control and Systems Diagnostics  (DCSD) (PD 17-7569)

Due January 13, 2017; September 15, 2017; and September 15 annually after that.

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505182

This program will support fundamental research on the analysis, measurement, monitoring and control of dynamic systems. The program promotes innovation in the following areas:

•Modeling: creation of new mathematical frameworks to apply tools of dynamics to physical systems

•Analysis: discovery and exploration of structure in dynamic behavior

•Diagnostics: dynamic methods that infer system properties from observations

•Control: methods that produce desired dynamic behavior

Proposals submitted to the DCSD program should clearly identify, articulate and motivate innovative components in one or more of the foundational areas above.

Furthermore, proposals should be aligned with the disciplinary thrusts of the CMMI division. To ensure that a project is appropriate for the DCSD program, PIs are very strongly encouraged to contact DCSD Program Directors prior to the full submission.

 

 

NSF: Manufacturing Machines and Equipment  (MME) (PD-17-1468)

Due January 13, 2017; September 15, 2017; and September 15 annually after that

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=13346

MME supports fundamental research that enables the development of new and/or improved manufacturing machines and equipment, and optimization of their use, with a particular focus on equipment appropriate for the manufacture of mechanical and electromechanical devices, products, and systems featuring scales from microns to meters (proposals relating to nanomanufacturing should be submitted to the CMMI NanoManufacturing program, and those relating to the manufacture of electronic devices such as IC products should be submitted to the ECCS Division). Proposals relating to a wide range of manufacturing operations are encouraged, including both subtractive and additive processes, forming, bonding/joining, and laser processing.  Proposals that will enable innovations in one or more of the Manufacturing USA institutes' focus areas (https://www.manufacturing.gov/nnmi-institutes/) and leverage the facilities, infrastructure and member companies of an institute, are also encouraged.

Competitive projects will propose hypothesis-driven research that advances the frontiers of knowledge in relevant areas. Proposals submitted to the MME program should include a clearly articulated research (not developmental) objective and a coherent plan to accomplish the stated objective. Both experimental and theoretical work are supported. The Project Description must contain, as a separate section within the narrative, a section labeled "Broader Impacts."

 

 

NSF Nanomanufacturing (PD 17-1788)

Due January 13, 2017; September 15, 2017; and September 15 annually after that.

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=13347

This program supports basic research in nanostructure and process design principles, integration across length-scales, and system-level integration. The program leverages advances in the understanding of nano-scale phenomena and processes (physical, chemical, electrical, thermal, mechanical and biological), nanomaterials discovery, novel nanostructure architectures, and new nanodevice and nanosystem concepts. It seeks to address quality, efficiency, scalability, reliability, safety and affordability issues that are relevant to manufacturing. To address these issues, the Program encourages research on processes and production systems based on computation, modeling and simulation, use of process metrology, sensing, monitoring, and control, and assessment of product (nanomaterial, nanostructure, nanodevice or nanosystem) quality and performance.

The program seeks to explore transformative approaches to nanomanufacturing, including but not limited to: micro-reactor and micro-fluidics enabled nanosynthesis, bio-inspired nanomanufacturing, manufacturing by nanomachines, additive nanomanufacturing, hierarchical nanostructure assembly, continuous high-rate nanofabrication such as roll-to-roll processing or massively-parallel large-area processing, and modular manufacturing platforms for nanosystems. The Program encourages the fabrication of nanomaterials by design, three-dimensional nanostructures, multi-layer nanodevices, and multi-material and multi-functional nanosystems. Also of interest is the manufacture of dynamic nanosystems such as nanomotors, nanorobots, and nanomachines, and enabling advances in transport and diffusion mechanisms at the nano-scale.

The program supports education of the next generation of researchers, and encourages building a workforce trained in nanomanufacturing systems. It is also interested in understanding long-term environmental, health and societal (EHS) implications of large-scale production and use of nano-scale materials, devices and systems.

 

 

NSF/NEH: Documenting Endangered Languages: data, infrastructure, and computational methods (NSF 15-567)

Due September 15 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15567/nsf15567.htm

This funding partnership between the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) supports projects to develop and advance knowledge concerning endangered human languages. Made urgent by the imminent death of roughly half of the approximately 7000 currently used languages, this effort aims to exploit advances in information technology to build computational infrastructure for endangered language research. The program supports projects that contribute to data management and archiving, and to the development of the next generation of researchers. Funding can support fieldwork and other activities relevant to the digital recording, documenting, and archiving of endangered languages, including the preparation of lexicons, grammars, text samples, and databases. Funding will be available in the form of one- to three-year senior research grants as well as fellowships from six to twelve months and doctoral dissertation research improvement grants for up to 24 months.

 

 

NSF: Mechanics of Materials (PD 17-1630)

Proposals are accepted September 1, 2017 - September 15, 2017 and September 1 - September 15, Annually Thereafter; and January 10, 2018 - January 24, 2018, and January 10 - January 24, Annually Thereafter.

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=13355

This program supports fundamental research in mechanics as related to the behavior of deformable solid materials and structures under internal and external actions. The program supports a diverse spectrum of research with emphasis on transformative advances in experimental, theoretical, and computational methods. Submitted proposals should clearly emphasize the contributions to the field of mechanics.

Proposals related to material response are welcome, including, but not limited to, advances in fundamental understanding of deformation, fracture, and fatigue as well as contact and friction. Proposals that relate to structural response are also welcome, including, but not limited to, advances in the understanding of nonlinear deformation, instability and collapse, and wave propagation. Proposals addressing mechanics at the intersection of materials and structures, such as, but not limited to, meta-materials, hierarchical, micro-architectured and low-dimensional materials are also encouraged.

Proposals that explore and build upon advanced computing techniques and tools to enable major advances in mechanics are particularly welcome. For example, proposals incorporating reduced-order modeling, data-driven techniques, and/or stochastic methods with a strong emphasis on validation are encouraged.  Also welcome are proposals addressing data analytics for deformation or damage response deduction from large experimental and computational data sets. Similarly, proposals that explore new experimental techniques to capture deformation and failure information for extreme ranges of loading or material behavior are also encouraged. Finally, experimental and computational methods that address information across multiple length and time scales, potentially involving multiphysics considerations are also welcome.

Proposals with a focus on buildings and civil infrastructure system are welcome in CMMI and should be submitted to the program on Structural and Architectural Engineering Materials (SAEM). Proposals addressing processing and mechanical performance enhancements should be submitted to the Materials Engineering and Processing (MEP) program. Investigators with proposals focused on design methodological approaches and theory enabling the accelerated development and insertion of materials should consider the Design of Engineering Material Systems (DEMS) program. Lastly, investigators with interest in developing a combined theoretical and experimental approach to accelerate materials discovery and development should direct their proposals to the Designing Materials to Revolutionize and Engineer Our Future (DMREF) opportunity.

Proposers are actively encouraged to email a one-page project summary to MOMS@nsf.gov before full proposal submission to determine if the research topic falls within the scope of the MOMS program.

 

 

NSF: Computational and Data-Enabled Science and Engineering in Mathematical and Statistical Sciences (PD-18-8069)

Due September 17, 2018; September 15 annually after that

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=504687

The CDS&E-MSS program accepts proposals that confront and embrace the host of mathematical and statistical challenges presented to the scientific and engineering communities by the ever-expanding role of computational modeling and simulation on the one hand, and the explosion in production of digital and observational data on the other. The goal of the program is to promote the creation and development of the next generation of mathematical and statistical theories and tools that will be essential for addressing such issues. To this end, the program will support fundamental research in mathematics and statistics whose primary emphasis will be on meeting the aforementioned computational and data-related challenges. This program is part of the wider Computational and Data-enabled Science and Engineering (CDS&E) enterprise in NSF that seeks to address this emerging discipline.

The research supported by the CDS&E-MSS program will aim to advance mathematics or statistics in a significant way and will address computational or big-data challenges.  Proposals of interest to the program will include a Principal Investigator or co-Principal Investigator who is a researcher in the mathematical or statistical sciences in an area supported by the Division of Mathematical Sciences.  The program encourages submission of proposals that include multidisciplinary collaborations or the training of mathematicians and statisticians in CDS&E.

 

 

NSF Materials Engineering and Processing (PD 17-8092)

Due September 17, 2018, and September 15 annually after that; January 24 annually

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=504950

The Materials Engineering and Processing (MEP) program supports fundamental research addressing the processing and mechanical performance  of engineering materials by investigating the interrelationship of materials processing, structure, properties and/or life-cycle performance for targeted applications.

 

 

NSF: Dynamics, Control and Systems Diagnostics  (DCSD) (PD 17-7569)

Due September 17, 2018; September 15 annually after that; January 24 annually

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505182&WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

The Dynamics, Control and Systems Diagnostics (DCSD) program supports fundamental research on the analysis, measurement, monitoring and control of dynamic systems. The program promotes innovation in the following areas:

    Modeling: creation of new mathematical frameworks to apply tools of dynamics to physical systems

    Analysis: discovery and exploration of structure in dynamic behavior

    Diagnostics: dynamic methods that infer system properties from observations

    Control: methods that produce desired dynamic behavior

Proposals submitted to the DCSD program should clearly identify, articulate and motivate innovative components in one or more of the foundational areas above.

Furthermore, proposals should be aligned with the disciplinary thrusts of the CMMI division. To ensure that a project is appropriate for the DCSD program, PIs are very strongly encouraged to contact DCSD Program Directors prior to the full submission.

Innovative research that primarily concerns electromagnetic or chemical phenomena should be directed to the ECCS or CBET divisions. The DCSD Program does not fund fundamental research relating to sensing modalities or sensor development. Proposals offering fundamental research on sensing modalities should be submitted to the Communications, Circuits and Sensing Systems (CCSS) program or the Electronics, Photonics, and Magnetic Devices (EPMD) program in the ECCS Division.

 

 

NSF Biomechanics and Mechanobiology (BMMB) (PD-17-7479)

Due September 17, 2018; September 15 annually after that; January 24 annually

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=13523

The BMMB program supports fundamental research in biomechanics and mechanobiology.  The program emphasizes multiscale mechanics approaches that integrate across molecular, cell, tissue and organ domains in the study of organisms. Projects may include theoretical, computational, and experimental approaches.

An important concern is the influence of in vivo mechanical forces on cell and matrix biology in the histomorphogenesis, maintenance, regeneration and aging of tissues.  The program also is interested in efforts to translate recent mechanobiological discoveries into engineering science.  The program encourages the consideration of diverse living tissues as smart materials that are self-designing.

 

 

NSF/NIH: Joint DMS/NIGMS Initiative to Support Research at the Interface of the Biological and Mathematical Sciences (DMS/NIGMS) (NSF 17-569)

Due September 18, 2017, and September 18 annually after that

https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf17569

The National Science Foundation (Math & Physical Sciences) and the National Institutes of Health (Institute of General Medical Sciences) have jointly released NSF 17-569, Joint DMS/NIGMS Initiative to Support Research at the Interface of the Biological and Mathematical Sciences (DMS/NIGMS). This program will make an estimated 20 awards of up to $400,000 each (total) to promote research at the interface of the biological and mathematical sciences. The expertise of DMS in the mathematical and statistical sciences and the complementary expertise of NIGMS in biological and biomedical research are expected to provide support for novel, transformative quantitative biological research.

Successful proposals will either involve the formulation of new mathematical, computational, or statistical models and tools whose analysis poses significant mathematical challenges or identify innovative mathematics or statistics needed to solve an important biological problem. Research that would apply standard mathematical or statistical techniques to solve biological problems is not appropriate for this competition and should be submitted directly to NIH. Similarly, proposals with research in mathematics or statistics that is not tied to a specific biological problem should be submitted to the appropriate DMS program at NSF. Proposals designed to create new software tools based on existing models and methods will not be accepted in this competition.

 

 

NSF: Research Experiences for Teachers in Engineering and Computer Science: Supplements and Sites (17-575)

Site proposals due October 10, 2017; September 19, 2018; and the third Wednesday in September annually (limit 3 per institution per year)

Supplement proposals accepted any time

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17575/nsf17575.htm

This solicitation covers both RET Sites and RET Supplements. Supplements can be for new proposals or for existing awards. In all cases, the purpose is to provide research opportunities in engineering or computer/information science to teachers (K-12 and community college).

Supplements: You can request up to $10,000 per teacher per year. In a new NSF proposal, you should check with the RET program officer for ENG or CISE as appropriate, and also check with the program officer for the proposal you are submitting. We add some supplementary documents to your proposal. The money for the supplement is on top of any budget limit for the underlying proposal. If you have an existing award and want to add an RET to it, you contact your current program officer and the appropriate RET program officer, and then go ahead with a submission for a supplement in Fastlane.

Sites: An RET Site builds active, long-term collaborations between K-12 STEM teachers, full-time community college faculty, and university faculty and students. The teachers participate as a group in a focused, hands-on research experience. The university team must include faculty, graduate and undergraduate students, and industrial advisors. The program should include having graduate students go to the schools during the subsequent academic year to support the integration of the RET curricular materials into classroom activities. Site awards can be up to $600,000 over three years.

UCR can submit up to three Site proposals per year – no more than two in engineering and one in computer/information science. One Site proposal is being developed in the Dean’s Office now (Marko Princevac is organizing it). The PI of a Site proposal must be a full-time, tenured or tenure-track faculty member in engineering or computer science. If you are interested in a Site proposal, please contact me, and we will see about how to integrate ideas (or not).

 

 

NIH Director's Transformative Research Award (R01 - Clinical Trial Optional) (RFA-RM-18-009)

Due September 21, 2018

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-18-009.html

This program supports individual scientists or groups of scientists proposing groundbreaking, exceptionally innovative, original, and/or unconventional research with the potential to create new scientific paradigms, establish entirely new and improved clinical approaches, or develop transformative technologies. Applications from individuals with diverse backgrounds and in any topic relevant to the broad mission of NIH are welcome. Little or no preliminary data are expected. Projects must clearly demonstrate the potential to produce a major impact in a broad area of biomedical or behavioral research. The NIH Director’s Transformative Research Award is a component of the High-Risk, High-Reward Research program of the NIH Common Fund.

The Transformative Research application focuses on the importance of the problem, the novelty of the hypothesis and/or the proposed methodology, and the magnitude of the potential impact rather than on preliminary data or experimental details. Reviewers will be instructed to emphasize the significance and innovation of the application in their evaluations. Applicants and reviewers should keep the goal of the Transformative Research Award in mind throughout the process– to solicit and fund unusually innovative and potentially transformative research.

NIH expects to make seven awards of up to five years each from an $8 million pool.

 

 

NSF EHR Core Research: Fundamental Research in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Education (15-509)

Due second Thursday in September annually

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15509/nsf15509.htm

The EHR Core Research (ECR) program of fundamental research in STEM education provides funding in critical research areas that are essential, broad and enduring. EHR seeks proposals that will help synthesize, build and/or expand research foundations in the following focal areas: STEM learning, STEM learning environments, STEM workforce development, and broadening participation in STEM.

The ECR program is distinguished by its emphasis on the accumulation of robust evidence to inform efforts to (a) understand, (b) build theory to explain, and (c) suggest interventions (and innovations) to address persistent challenges in STEM interest, education, learning, and participation. The program supports advances in fundamental research on STEM learning and education by fostering efforts to develop foundational knowledge in STEM learning and learning contexts, both formal and informal, from childhood through adulthood, for all groups, and from the earliest developmental stages of life through participation in the workforce, resulting in increased public understanding of science and engineering. The ECR program will fund fundamental research on: human learning in STEM; learning in STEM learning environments, STEM workforce development, and research on broadening participation in STEM.

 

 

NIH: Bridges to the Doctorate (PAR-17-209) (R25)

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-17-209.html

Due September 25, 2017; September 25, 2018

The National Institutes of Health have reissued the Bridges to the Doctorate solicitation, now PAR-17-209. The over-arching goal of this National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) R25 program is to support educational activities that enhance the diversity of the biomedical research workforce.

To accomplish the stated over-arching goal, this FOA will support creative educational activities with a primary focus on Courses for Skills Development and Research Experiences. 

The Bridges to Doctorate Program is intended to provide these educational activities to Master's level students to increase transition to and completion of Ph.D.'s in biomedical sciences. A program application must include each educational activity, and describe how they will be synergized to make a comprehensive program.

This program requires partnerships between master's degree-granting institutions with doctorate degree-granting institutions.

Additionally, recruitment and retention plans are required as part of the application.

 

 

NIH: Bridges to the Baccalaureate (PAR-17-210) (R25)

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-17-210.html

Due September 25, 2017; September 25, 2018

The National Institutes of Health have reissued the Bridges to the Baccalaureate program, now PAR-17-210.

The over-arching goal of this  National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) Bridges to Baccalaureate  R25 program is to support educational activities that enhance the diversity of the biomedical research workforce. To accomplish the stated over-arching goal, this FOA will support creative educational activities with a primary focus on:

• Courses for Skills Development: For example, advanced courses in a specific discipline or research area, clinical procedures for research, or specialized research techniques.   

• Research Experiences: For example, for undergraduate students: to provide hands-on exposure to research, to reinforce their intent to graduate with a science degree, and/or to prepare them for graduate school admissions and/or careers in research.   

• Curriculum or Methods Development: For example, to improve biomedical science education, or develop novel instructional approaches or computer-based educational tools; to provide supplemental instruction for gateway courses; to develop "CURE" courses in community college first a

 

 

NIDDK Research Education Program Grants for Summer Research Experiences (R25) (PAR-15-140)

Due January 25, May 25, and September 25 annually through January 2018

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-15-140.html

The over-arching goals of the NIH R25 program are to: (1) complement and/or enhance the training of a workforce to meet the nation’s biomedical, behavioral and clinical research needs; (2) enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral and clinical research workforce; (3) help recruit individuals with specific specialty or disciplinary backgrounds to research careers in biomedical, behavioral and clinical sciences; and (4) foster a better understanding of biomedical, behavioral and clinical research and its implications. This program will support research experiences for visiting undergraduate and graduate students. Examples of specific programmatic themes include, but are not limited to: specific disease processes of interest to NIDDK (e.g. diabetes, cystic fibrosis, inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, hepatitis, renal diseases, urologic or hematological disorders);  the translation of basic science discoveries to patient care ("bench to bedside" research); the relationships of specific organ systems (e.g., Endocrine, digestive, renal, hematopoietic) to health and illness;  the appreciation and integration of whole animal physiology in current biomedical research; information on how molecular, genomic and informatic techniques may be applied to NIDDK-relevant diseases and research; the development of therapeutics related to diseases relevant to the NIDDK.

Research education programs may complement ongoing research training and education occurring at the applicant institution, but the proposed educational experiences must be distinct from those training and education programs currently receiving Federal support. R25 programs may augment institutional research training programs (e.g., T32, T90) but cannot be used to replace or circumvent Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) programs.

Budgets can be up to $100,000 of direct costs per year for up to five years, with 8% indirect costs.

 

 

Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Short-Term Institutional Research Training Grant (Parent T35) (PA-18-404)

Due January 25, May 25, and September 25 through 2020

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-18-404.html

This solicitation applies to these institutes only:

National Eye Institute (NEI)

National Institute on Aging (NIA)

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB)

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD)

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)

Division of Program Coordination, Planning and Strategic Initiatives, Office of Research Infrastructure Programs (ORIP)

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) will award Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Short-Term Institutional Research Training Grants (T35) to eligible, domestic institutions to develop and/or enhance research training opportunities for predoctoral students interested in careers in biomedical, behavioral, or clinical research. Many NIH Institutes and Centers (ICs) use this NRSA program exclusively to support intensive, short-term research training experiences for health professional students (medical students, veterinary students, and/or students in other health-professional programs) during the summer. This program is also intended to encourage training of graduate students in the physical or quantitative sciences to pursue research careers by short-term exposure to, and involvement in, the health-related sciences. The training should be of sufficient depth to enable the trainees, upon completion of the program, to have a thorough exposure to the principles underlying the conduct of biomedical research.    

NIH will provide funds to help defray other research training expenses, such as health insurance, staff salaries, consultant costs, equipment, research supplies, and faculty/staff travel directly related to the research training program.

 

 

NIH: Perception and Cognition Research to Inform Cancer Image Interpretation (R01 and R21)

PAR 18-640 (R01), https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-18-640.html

PAR 18-641 (R21), https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-18-641.html

The National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute and Nationals institute of Biomedical imaging and Bioengineering announce funding opportunity PAR 18-640 (R01) and 18-641 (R21): Perception and Cognition Research to Inform Cancer Image Interpretation.

The purpose of these FOAs is to facilitate research on the perceptual and cognitive processes underlying the performance of cancer image observers in radiology and pathology, in order to improve the accuracy of cancer detection and diagnosis. Specifically, the FOA will bring scientists with expertise in visual perception and cognition together with radiologists, pathologists, nuclear medicine physicians, and other experts in cancer image interpretation.

Projects suitable for this FOA will have a focus on underlying cognitive and perceptual mechanisms, rather than descriptive studies. This FOA is not appropriate for the development of new software tools or expert systems, but studies of how human observers interact with such systems would be appropriate.

Under this FOA, NIBIB will support applications proposing early-stage clinical trials through Phase I, first-in-human, safety, feasibility or other small clinical trials that inform early-stage technology development.

This FOA encourages transdisciplinary research projects that integrate expertise from diverse disciplines such as medical image perception, cognitive psychology, vision science, neuroscience, computer science, radiology, nuclear medicine, pathology, molecular imaging, and dermatology.

R21

Project Period: 2 years maximum

Direct costs may not exceed $275,000 total, no more than $200,000 may be requested in any single year.

Proposals due May 30, 2018; September 26, 2018; May 30, 2019; September 26, 2019

R01

Project Period: 5 years maximum

Budget: Unlimited (must reflect actual needs of the proposed project)

Proposals due May 30, 2018; September 26, 2018; May 30, 2019; September 26, 2019

Letters of intent are requested but not required 30 days before the proposal deadline.

 

 

NSF: Innovations at the Nexus of Food, Energy and Water Systems (INFEWS) (18-545)

Due September 26, 2018

at https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?WT.z_pims_id=505241&ods_key=nsf18545

The National Science Foundation has significantly revised its program solicitation for Innovations at the Nexus of Food, Energy and Water Systems (INFEWS), now 18-545. The overarching goal of the INFEWS program is to catalyze well-integrated, convergent research to transform understanding of the food-energy-water (FEW) Nexus as integrated social, engineering, physical, and natural systems in order to improve system function and management, address system stress, increase resilience, and ensure sustainability. The NSF INFEWS activity is designed specifically to attain the following goals:

-- Significantly advance our understanding of the food-energy-water system of systems through quantitative, predictive and computational modeling, including support for relevant cyberinfrastructure;

-- Develop real-time, cyber-enabled interfaces that improve understanding of the behavior of FEW systems and increase decision support capability;

-- Enable research that will lead to innovative and integrated social, engineering, physical, and natural systems solutions to critical FEW systems problems;

-- Grow the scientific workforce capable of studying and managing the FEW system of systems, through education and other professional development opportunities.

This program has three tracks. An individual may be involved in only one proposal per track, and no more than two proposals total in response to this solicitation.

Track 1: Social-Physical Modeling of FEW Systems (5-10 awards expected, 3-5 years per award, up to $2.5 million per award). Track 1 aims to significantly advance understanding of FEW systems with advanced modeling that investigates the functioning of coupled social, physical, biotic, abiotic, and engineered systems. The goal is to define and understand the couplings/linkages, feedback mechanisms and processes among the FEW systems components and to elucidate the factors that influence resilience, thresholds and criticalities. Track 1 projects should articulate clear hypotheses and/or describe what anticipated theoretical advancements will likely emerge from the systems modeling efforts. These projects should enable innovative perspectives and advances in understanding and modeling complex systems processes. Development of advanced computational methods and effective means for incorporation of large quantities of disparate data, as implemented in new and novel software and tools, is also appropriate.

Track 2: Research to Enable Innovative System Solutions (5-10 awards expected, 3-5 years per award, up to $2.5 million per award). FEW systems are facing multiple stresses, including, but not limited to, shifting social, economic and governance norms, increasing global populations, rapid land use change, and escalating climate variability. Heterogeneous resource distribution and access, increasing resource scarcity, degraded resource quality, and diminished ecosystem services also challenge long-term FEW systems sustainability. Track 2 projects will develop and examine innovative solutions that address specific FEW system challenges and aim to enhance FEW systems’ resilience and sustainability. Research on innovative institutional, behavioral, and technological solutions – and the coupled-combinations of solutions – is needed. Track 2 research might explore sustainable management solutions, examine the drivers of resource consumption, and study the means of extending resources via methods such as reducing, recycling, recovery, and reuse, among other topics. Track 2 projects must take a systems approach when researching potential solutions. A project that addresses the three components (food, energy, and water) separately, rather than integrating all three in a single system simultaneously, is not appropriate for the INFEWS solicitation. Projects should demonstrate how the envisioned solution will contribute to system-wide improvements across sectors and places.

Track 3: INFEWS Research Coordination Networks (INFEWS-RCN) (5-10 awards expected, 4-5 years per award, up to $750,000 per award). This track supports the establishment of new networks of interdisciplinary researchers from multiple organizations who will collectively and significantly advance INFEWS concepts, knowledge and new directions through active exchange of ideas, development of new directions in fundamental research and education, and other approaches. An INFEWS-RCN should be designed to identify and address an ambitious, nationally, and/or internationally important theme across INFEWS systems that requires the scale, breadth, facilities, and integration across disciplines and sectors made possible by a large and diverse network. INFEWS-RCN awards are not meant to support the existing activities of established collaborations/projects, nor should they support the planning or performance of individual or group research projects. Funds from this program may not support independent, individual research projects of the participants; nor are they to be used as a mechanism for a mini-grant awarding program. Rather, an INFEWS-RCN should engage in activities that will facilitate (1) the advancement of fundamental INFEWS research ideas across diverse research communities; (2) building of coordinated, new and novel networks of innovation that go beyond the scope of funded activities conducted by the members of the INFEWS-RCN; and (3) communication with stakeholders on INFEWS concepts and research.

 

 

NSF: Research in the Formation of Engineers (PD 17-1340)

Proposals will be accepted twice per year: September 27, 2017, and the fourth Wednesday in September annually after that, and January 24, 2018, and the fourth Wednesday in January annually after that

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=503584.

The National Science Foundation has revised its program on the professional formation of engineers. The new program is PD 17-1340, Research in the Formation of Engineers (RFE), https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=503584.

PIs without engineering education research or other social science research experience should consider applying to the Research Initiation in Engineering Formation solicitation (NSF 17-514), https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=503603, rather than Research in the Formation of Engineers. PIs can contact a cognizant program officer to discuss which program is more appropriate.

RFE makes awards of up to 3 years and $350,000 in the following areas:

1. Research Projects

RFE supports Foundational and Early-Stage/Exploratory research (see https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf13126) in all areas of engineering education. In addition to proposals on undergraduate engineering education, proposals are particularly welcome in the following areas:

•Lifelong learning by the engineering workforce

•Research on the impact of engineering education research. Proposals addressing this topic could investigate questions such as: How can we measure the impacts of engineering education research? What are effective strategies for scaling reforms? How can we translate knowledge from research to practice? What are the roles of networks and communities in achieving impact? RFE does not support efficacy, effectiveness, or scale-up studies for specific interventions.

•Research that addresses engineering formation at the two year college and graduate education levels in both formal and informal settings. Included in this topic are investigations of identity formation, normative cultures of engineering and how these cultures may disadvantage certain groups, development of professional and technical skills, etc.

•Research that investigates engineering in K12 settings. Research in this area could include understanding of approaches to engineering in K12, how to develop engineering ways of thinking, or the relationship between practices within the sciences or mathematics and engineering thinking.

•Research on the transitions between education levels, e.g. high school to two year college, high school to 4 year college/university, two year college to 4 year college/university, undergraduate to graduate school, education settings to the workforce or professoriate, etc.

•The relationship between engineering and the public. Proposals addressing this topic could consider the social impact of engineering solutions, citizen engineering, education of an informed public, etc.

Proposals submitted to the Research Projects category should have clear research questions informed by an appropriate theoretical framework and a research design that includes sampling, data collection, and data analysis methods. This category will not support proposals that seek funding primarily to develop tools, curriculum, or laboratories, or that seek to implement classroom innovations that have already been shown to be effective in engineering.

2. Design and Development Projects

RFE supports Design and Development projects (see https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf13126) that seek to develop and test new approaches in the following areas:

•Graduate education

•Transitions between education levels, e.g. high school to two year college, high school to 4 year college/university, two year college to 4 year college/university, undergraduate to graduate school, education settings to the workforce or professoriate, etc.

•K12, especially approaches to develop engineering thinking, or providing links between engineering, science, and mathematics

Design and Development projects for contexts other than those listed above will not be accepted. Proposals in this category should propose the design and development of new approaches that are informed by existing literature and theory. There should be clear objectives and the evaluation plan should be designed to determine if those objectives have been met. Projects cannot be solely demonstration projects, but must add to the engineering education literature to inform future work.

 

 

BRAIN Initiative: New Technologies and Novel Approaches for Large-Scale Recording and Modulation in the Nervous System (R01) (RFA-NS-18-020)

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-18-019.html

and

BRAIN Initiative: Optimization of Transformative Technologies for Large Scale Recording and Modulation in the Nervous System (U01) (RFA-NS-18-019)

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-18-019.html

Proposals are due May 15, 2018, October 29, 2018, May 1, 2019, October 29, 2019, May 1, 2020, and October 29, 2020. Letters of intent are due one month before the proposal due date.

These FOAs seek applications to conduct proof-of-concept development and testing of new technologies and novel approaches for large-scale recording and manipulation of neural activity, to enable transformative understanding of dynamic signaling in the nervous system.

This program has three general goals:

1. Develop New Large-Scale Network Recording Capabilities

2. Develop Tools for Circuit Manipulation

3. Link Neural Activity to Behavior

The goal of this FOA is to produce technologies with potential to elucidate nervous system function, in health and disease, in the context of complex behaviors.  Proposed technologies should be compatible with experiments in behaving animals and should be validated under in vivo experimental conditions.  In addition, novel approaches for enabling large-scale neural recording or manipulation during complex behaviors are encouraged along with the computational and statistical tools necessary to link neural activity to behavior.  In combination with concurrent measurement and manipulation of neuronal activity, applications may propose methods to enhance the ability to quantify and interpret animal behavior, at high temporal and spatial resolution, reliably and objectively, over long periods of time and under a broad set of conditions.

 

 

National Geospatial Intelligence Agency Academic Research Program (HM0476-18-BAA-0001)

White papers accepted on an ongoing basis through September 2021

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=302176

This program will make grants and cooperative agreements to academic institutions for innovative, far-reaching basic and applied research having the potential to advance the geospatial intelligence (GEOINT) mission. NGA Research Directorate is responsible for the development and growth of GEOINT tradecraft and outreach activities. The five goals are to:

1. Create and transition new capabilities that automate identification and characterization of objects, features, and activities of interest. (Automation)

2. Develop advanced GEOINT capabilities and tradecraft in critical areas: EO, IR, Radar, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), Cyber, language, populations, food & water, geomatics, and geophysics. (Enrich GEOINT)

3. Create and transition protected new capabilities. (GEOINT Assurance)

4. Construct and leverage high performance computing capabilities to advance GEOINT. (High Performance Compute)

5. Transitional high value R&D capabilities into operations. (R&D Transition to Operations)

These are the specific areas of interest:

Synthetic Aperture Radar Signal and Image Processing

Inclusion of Sensor Performance Parameters into the Error Model for Subsidence Determination from Synthetic Aperture Radar Systems

Inclusion of Sensor Performance Parameters into the Error Model for Polarimetric SAR land use classification from Synthetic Aperture Radar Systems

Multiple Object Detection

Object Detection Confidence

Foundation Feature Extraction

Automated geo-located information from small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UASs) video

Geomagnetic field observation and modeling for Enhanced Positioning and Navigation support

Underwater Sensors

Understanding the Estimated Scale Differences between Different Space Geodetic Techniques

Corrections of Signals in Next Generation sub-micro-Gal Absolute Gravimeter Measurements

Fundamental limits of class separation in spectral imagery

Characterization of atmospheric turbulence as it impacts optical transmission paths

Detection, characterization, and discrimination of plasmas in space

Rigorous methods for simulating space weathering and characterization of materials

Characterization of space weather by passive means

Environment and Culture

Food Security: Gaps in Crop Classification

Spatial features for Agricultural Analysis

Impacts of Environmental Change on National Security in the Arctic

Understanding Water budgets

Acoustic indicators of anthropogenic and environmental activity

 

 

October

 

 

NSF Ceramics

Proposals accepted any time, subject to certain limits; see below.

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2016/nsf16597/nsf16597.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

The National Science Foundation has significantly revised its Ceramics program, now Program Solicitation 16-597. This program will make an estimated 20 awards per year from a $10 million pool to support supports fundamental scientific research in ceramics (e.g., oxides, carbides, nitrides and borides), glass-ceramics, inorganic glasses, ceramic-based composites and inorganic carbon-based materials. Projects should be centered on experiments; inclusion of computational and theory components is encouraged. The objective of the program is to increase fundamental understanding and to develop predictive capabilities for relating synthesis, processing, and microstructure of these materials to their properties and ultimate performance in various environments and applications. Research to enhance or enable the discovery or creation of new ceramic materials is welcome. Development of new experimental techniques or novel approaches to carry out projects is encouraged. Topics supported include basic processes and mechanisms associated with nucleation and growth of thin films; bulk crystal growth; phase transformations and equilibria; morphology; surface modification; corrosion, interfaces and grain boundary structure; and defects.

An investigator may only have one submission to CER at a given time. Since the Division of Materials Research (DMR) discourages the submission across DMR's disciplinary research activity programs (also called individual investigator award or IIA programs) of more than one proposal during the DMR annual proposal-submission window each fall, contravening this guidance with a submission to CER in the July to December period AND a submission to another IIA program in the DMR window (as a PI or co-PI) may result in the CER proposal being returned without review. In addition, investigators must wait at least 12 months between submissions to CER. Failure to observe these submission constraints may lead to the CER proposal being returned without review. Investigators with proposals submitted to the DMREF, PREM, MRSEC, and MIP programs may have a concurrent CER submission.

 

 

NSF: Condensed Matter and Materials Theory (CMMT) (NSF 16-596)

Proposals accepted any time, subject to restrictions below

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2016/nsf16596/nsf16596.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

. This program will make an estimated 40 awards per year from a $15 million pool to support theoretical and computational materials research in the topical areas represented in DMR's core or individual investigator programs, which include: Condensed Matter Physics (CMP), Biomaterials (BMAT), Ceramics (CER), Electronic and Photonic Materials (EPM), Metals and Metallic Nanostructures (MMN), Polymers (POL), and Solid State and Materials Chemistry (SSMC). The program supports fundamental research that advances the conceptual understanding of hard and soft materials, and materials-related phenomena; the development of associated analytical, computational, and data-centric techniques; as well as predictive materials-specific theory, simulation, and modeling for materials research. The broad spectrum of research supported in CMMT includes first-principles, quantum many-body, statistical mechanics, classical and quantum Monte Carlo, and molecular dynamics methods. Computational efforts span from workstations to advanced and high-performance scientific computing. Emphasis is on approaches that begin at the smallest appropriate length scale, such as electronic, atomic, molecular, nano-, micro-, and mesoscale, required to yield fundamental insight into material properties, processes, and behavior, to predict new materials and states of matter, and to reveal new materials-related phenomena. Approaches that span multiple scales of length and time may be required to advance fundamental understanding of materials properties and phenomena, particularly for polymeric materials and soft matter. Examples of areas of recent interest appear in the program description.

CMMT encourages potentially transformative theoretical and computational materials research, which includes but is not limited to: i) developing materials-specific prediction and advancing understanding of properties, phenomena, and emergent states of matter associated with either hard or soft materials, ii) developing and exploring new paradigms including cyber- and data-enabled approaches to advance fundamental understanding of materials and materials related phenomena, or iii) fostering research at interfaces among subdisciplines represented in the Division of Materials Research.

Research involving significant materials research cyberinfrastructure development, for example, software development with an aim to share software with the broader materials community, should be submitted to CMMT through Computational and Data-Enabled Science and Engineering (CDS&E) within its annual proposal submission window in the fall.

The submission date of a proposal from an investigator, whether PI or co-PI, to the CMMT program cannot be within 6 months before or after the submission date of any proposal from that same investigator, whether PI or co-PI, to any DMR disciplinary research activity program (also called individual-investigator program) or the Chemical Theory, Models and Computational Methods program in the Division of Chemistry. Failure to observe this submission constraint may lead to the CMMT proposal being returned without review. Investigators with proposals submitted to the DMREF, PREM, MRSEC, and MIP programs may have a concurrent CMMT submission. In addition, investigators must wait at least 12 months between submissions to CMMT.

Experimental Condensed Matter proposals should go through the Condensed Matter Physics program, PD 03-1710, due October 31 annually.

 

 

DOE Basic Energy Science (DE-FOA-0001664)

Open indefinitely; renews October 1 annually

https://science.energy.gov/~/media/grants/pdf/foas/2017/SC_FOA_0001664.pdf

The Office of Science of the Department of Energy hereby announces its continuing interest in receiving grant applications for support of work in the following program areas:

Advanced Scientific Computing Research

Basic Energy Sciences

Biological and Environmental Research

Fusion Energy Sciences

High Energy Physics

Nuclear Physics

 

 

NIH: Maximizing Investigators' Research Award for Early Stage Investigators (PAR-17-190)

Proposals will be accepted October 3, 2017; October 3, 2018; and October 3, 2019.

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-17-190.html

This program provides up to $250,000 per year of direct costs to early stage investigators (to oversimplify: PIs who are within 10 years of completing their Ph.D.s., and who have not been PIs of R-series NIH grants before) to carry out a portfolio of research related to the NIGMS mission. NIGMS supports research on technology development and computational approaches, as well as basic biomedical sciences, translational, and clinical research, and all phases of the scientific process, not only hypothesis testing. Within the scope of the MIRA, investigators will have the freedom to explore new avenues of inquiry that arise during the course of their research, as long as they remain within the mission of NIGMS.

It is anticipated that this funding mechanism will achieve the following:

• Increase the stability of funding for NIGMS-supported investigators, which could enhance their ability to take on ambitious scientific projects and approach problems more creatively;

• Increase flexibility for investigators to follow important new research directions as opportunities arise, rather than being bound to specific aims proposed in advance of the studies;

• More widely distribute funding among the nation's highly talented and promising investigators to increase overall scientific productivity and the chances for important breakthroughs;

• Reduce the time spent by researchers writing and reviewing grant applications, allowing them to spend more time conducting research; and

• Enable PD(s)/PI(s) to devote more time and energy to mentoring junior scientists in a more stable research environment.

 

 

NIH: BRAIN Initiative: Tools to target, identify and characterize non-neuronal cells in the brain (RFA-DA-18-018)

Due February 1, 2018, and October 4, 2018. Letters of intent are requested 30 days prior.

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DA-18-018.html

This program will make R01 awards to stimulate the development and validation of novel tools and analytical methods to target, identify and characterize non-neuronal cells in the brain. Clinical trial research is not allowed.

Specific areas of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

This FOA seeks applications in, but not limited to, the following areas:

Targeting brain non-neuronal cells

•Novel non-genetic and genetic points of entry to deliver active agents or access intracellular cell contents in specific glial or vascular cell types

•Novel methods for tagging individual glial or vascular cells or their point of contact such that cellular components or subcomponents of a functional circuit can be explored.

•Novel, cell-type specific transgenic methods applicable in multiple model species for refined comparative studies of glial or vascular cells

•Novel tissue processing and cellular labelling methods to visualize non-neuronal cells both at the EM and light-microscopic level

Identification and description of brain non-neuronal cell-types

•Novel tools and approaches that improve the inventory and classification of non-neuronal cell types across the whole brain, within a brain region or within functionally defined circuit in the brain (using molecular, morphological, functional or integrated parameters)

•Unique single-cell and systems-level analytic approaches that help define the lineage of heterogeneous glial and vascular cell-types across the whole brain, within a brain region, or within a functional circuitry in the brain

•Novel automated and scalable assays for high-throughput analysis of single glial or vascular cells in situ in the brain, including scalability of measured parameters in parallel, cell numbers and/or speed of processing.

Manipulation and functional characterization of brain non-neuronal cells

•Techniques with enhanced temporal and spatial resolution for noninvasive molecular imaging of glial or vascular cells' structure, connectivity or function

•Innovative biological and optical methods to identify or manipulate intercellular connections at the glio-neuro-vascular interface and determine their influence on circuit function

•Novel cell-type or subtype specific methods for visualizing epigenomic marks in glial or vascular cells in identified neural structures or circuits.

•Innovative approaches to bridge experimental scales. Studies that achieve exploration of molecular and intracellular mechanisms in glial or vascular cells while monitoring neuronal or vascular activity in broader contexts are encouraged.

 

 

NSF: Training-based Workforce Development for Advanced Cyberinfrastructure (CyberTraining) (17-507)

Due January 18, 2017; October 9, 2017; and the second Monday in October annually after that.

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17507/nsf17507.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click.

This program will support innovations in any domain supported by NSF ENG, GEO, MPS, or CISE Directorates to prepare, nurture and grow the national scientific workforce for creating, utilizing, and supporting advanced cyberinfrastructure (CI) that enables cutting-edge science and engineering and contributes to the Nation's overall economic competitiveness and security.

NSF invites proposals that identify the community needs in training and education outside the classroom that require significant innovations - including the challenge of broadening CI access and adoption by those communities and institutions with low CI adoption as well as underrepresented groups. These proposals shall engage the relevant set of partners required as investigators, collaborators, resource providers, and early adopters, and include plans for effective outreach to the stakeholder communities. Proposals shall articulate well-designed programs with potential for significant impacts, which can serve as templates and provide curricular material and supporting resources to be adopted by other institutions and potentially by sub-communities/sub-disciplines. A key challenge is to design or update suitable training curriculum that will receive buy-in from the larger community of stakeholders as relevant, high quality and adoptable.

As investigators conceive of novel training models and activities, they are challenged to explore the following aspects for short-term impacts: (i) preparing a better scientific workforce for advanced CI; (ii) broadening adoption and accessibility both as users and contributors of institutional, regional, and national shared computing and data resources by various disciplines, institutions, and groups; (iii) complementing and leveraging the state of art in curricular offerings and material in academia, industry and elsewhere; (iv) creating alliances and backbones for collective impact; (v) providing on-demand, personalized accessibility; (vi) exploring innovative ways of drawing students into computational disciplines (X+Computing and Computing+X); (vii) identifying areas of workforce demand and career pathways; (viii) innovating in training/certification models, curriculum, educational material and activities, and their sustainability; and (ix) leveraging and contributing to NSF cyberinfrastructure and research projects (such as XSEDE, NanoHub, CyVerse, LIGO, and NHERI).

There are three tracks for submissions:

(i) CI Professionals (CIP): aimed at the training and career pathway development of research cyberinfrastructure and professional staff who develop, deploy, manage, and support effective use of advanced CI for research.

(ii) Domain science and engineering (DSE): aimed primarily at the communities of CI Contributors and sophisticated CI Users, and aligned with the research and education priorities of the participating domain directorates.

(iii) Computational and data science literacy (CDL): aimed at the CI User community at the undergraduate level.

Awards will be $300,000 to $500,000 each and will be for up to three years. NSF expects to make 10-15 awards per year.

There is no limit on the number of proposals per institution, but an individual may be PI or Co-PI on only one proposal.

 

 

NSF: Growing Convergence Research (DCL 18-058)

Due October 15, 2018

from https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2018/nsf18058/nsf18058.jsp?WT.mc_id=US

This announcement invites prospectuses for funding of convergent research topics, which meet the following two criteria:

-- Research driven by a specific and compelling problem. Research requiring a convergence paradigm is generally inspired by the need to address a specific challenge or opportunity, whether it arises from deep scientific questions or pressing societal needs.

-- Deep integration across disciplines. As experts from different disciplines pursue common research challenges, their knowledge, theories, methods, data, research communities and languages become increasingly intermingled or integrated. New frameworks, paradigms or disciplines can form from sustained interactions across multiple communities.

Prospectuses are due October 15, 2018. Full proposals will be invited within 60 days after that.

 

 

NSF: MacroSystems Biology and Early NEON Science: Research on Biological Systems at Regional to Continental Scales (16-521)

Due March 15, 2016, October 17, 2016, and the third Monday in October annually after that

http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf16521

. This program will make three classes of awards for projects that carry out quantitative, interdisciplinary, systems-oriented research on biosphere processes and their complex interactions with climate, land use, and invasive species at regional to continental scales.

The three categories of awards are:

Category 1: Early Career Awards (ECA). Awards to early career scientists employing innovative and creative approaches to advance understanding of regional to continental scale processes and cross-scale interactions. These awards will be limited to a maximum of $300,000 over a two year duration. To be eligible, you must have a tenure-track appointment and be untenured as of the October 1 following proposal submission.

Category 2: Full Research Awards (FRA). Awards to support Macrosystems Biology Research or Innovative Training to conduct MacroSystems research. These awards may be up to 5 years in duration.

Category 3: Early NEON Science Awards (ENSA). Grants that do not otherwise fit into the macrosystems biology focus on regional to continental scale questions, but 1) use or leverage NEON data and/or NEON samples/specimens to address innovative ecological or other biological questions, and/or 2) develop analytic or computational tools that enhance the use and value of NEON data. These awards may be up to 5 years in duration.

NEON is the  National Ecological Observatory Network. Projects that encourage use of data or resources from NEON are especially encouraged.

 

 

NSF: Energy for Sustainability (PD 16-7644)

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505339

Due October 20 annually

The goal of the Energy for Sustainability program is to support fundamental engineering research that will enable innovative processes for the sustainable production of electricity and fuels, and for energy storage. Processes for sustainable energy production must be environmentally benign, reduce greenhouse gas production, and utilize renewable resources. Research projects that stress molecular level understanding of phenomena that directly impacts key barriers to improved system level performance (e.g. energy efficiency, product yield, process intensification) are encouraged. Proposed research should be inspired by the need for economic and impactful conversion processes. All proposals should include in the project description, how the proposed work, if successful, will improve process realization and economic feasibility and compare the proposed work against current state-of-the-art. Highly integrated multidisciplinary projects are encouraged.

Current topics of interest are the following:

1. Electrochemical Energy Systems

2. Organic Photovoltaics:

The duration of unsolicited awards is typically one to three years.  The typical award size for the program is $100,000 per year. Collaborative proposals that include a strong multi-disciplinary component are typically $150,000 per year. Proposals requesting a substantially higher amount than this, without prior consultation with the Program Director, may be returned without review.

 

 

NSF: Biotechnology and Biochemical Engineering (PD 16-1491)

Due October 20 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505334

The Biotechnology and Biochemical Engineering (BBE) program supports fundamental engineering research that advances the understanding of cellular and biomolecular processes in engineering biology and eventually leads to the development of enabling technology for advanced manufacturing and/or applications in support of the biopharmaceutical, biotechnology, and bioenergy industries, or with applications in health or the environment.  A quantitative treatment of biological and engineering problems of biological processes is considered vital to successful research projects in the BBE program.

Fundamental to many research projects in this area is the understanding of how biomolecules, cells and cell populations interact in their environment, and how those molecular level interactions lead to changes in structure, function, phenotype, and/or behavior.  The program encourages highly innovative and potentially transformative engineering research leading to novel bioprocessing and manufacturing approaches, and proposals that address emerging research areas and technologies that effectively integrate knowledge and practices from different disciplines while incorporating ongoing research into educational activities.

Major areas of interest in the program include:

•Metabolic engineering and synthetic biology for biomanufacturing

•Quantitative systems biotechnology

•Tissue engineering and stem cell culture technologies

•Protein engineering, biocatalysis and enzyme technologies

•Single cell dynamics and modeling

•Development of novel "omics" tools for biotechnology applications

NOTE: For proposals involving any aspect of sustainable chemistry and engineering, including but not limited to biochemistry or physical chemistry, consider making proposal submissions to this program (1491) with the Proposal Title as:  SusChEM: Title of Your Proposal'. 

 

 

NSF: Biological and Environmental Interactions of Nanoscale Materials (PD 18-1179)

Full proposals are accepted any time

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505424&WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

The Biological and Environmental Interactions of Nanoscale Materials program is part of the The Biological and Environmental Interactions of Nanoscale Materials program is part of the Environmental Engineering and Sustainability cluster, which includes also 1) Environmental Engineering; and 2) Environmental Sustainability.

The goal of the Biological and Environmental Interactions of Nanoscale Materials program is to support research to advance fundamental and quantitative understanding of the interactions of biological and environmental media with nanomaterials and nanosystems. Materials of interest include one- to three-dimensional nanostructures, heterogeneous nano-bio hybrid assemblies, and other nanoparticles. Such nanomaterials and systems frequently exhibit novel physical, chemical, and biological behavior in living systems and environmental matrices as compared to the bulk scale. This program supports research that explores the interaction of nanomaterials in biological and environmental media.    

Research areas supported by the program include:

·         Characterization of interactions at the interfaces between nanomaterials and nanosystems with surrounding biological and environmental media, including both simple nanoparticles and complex and/or heterogeneous composites;

·         Development of predictive tools based on the fundamental behavior of nanostructures within biological and ecological matrices to advance cost-effective and environmentally benign processing and engineering solutions over full life material cycles;

·         Examining the transport, interaction, and impact of nanostructured materials and nanosystems on biological systems;

·         Simulations of nanoparticle behavior at interfaces, in conjunction with experimental comparisons, and new theories and simulation approaches for determining the transport and transformation of nanoparticles in various media.

Research in these areas will enable the design of nanostructured materials and heterogeneous nanosystems with optimal chemical, electronic, photonic, biological, and mechanical properties for their safe handling, management, and utilization.

Innovative proposals outside of these specific interest areas may be considered. However, prior to submission, it is recommended that the PI contact the Program Director to avoid the possibility of the proposal being returned without review.

The duration of unsolicited awards is generally one to three years. The typical award size for the program is $100,000 per year. Proposals requesting a substantially higher amount than this, without prior consultation with the Program Director, may be returned without review.

Last updated 4/6/17 MB

 

 

NSF: Cellular and Biochemical Engineering (PD 17-1491)

Due October 20 annually

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505334

The Cellular and Biochemical Engineering program is part of the Engineering Biology and Health cluster, which includes also 1) Engineering of Biomedical Systems; 2) Biophotonics; 3) Nano-Biosensing; and 4) Disability and Rehabilitation Engineering.

The Cellular and Biochemical Engineering (CBE) program supports fundamental engineering research that advances the understanding of cellular and biomolecular processes in engineering biology and eventually leads to the development of enabling technology for advanced biomanufacturing in support of the therapeutic cells, biochemical, biopharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.  A quantitative treatment of biological and engineering problems of biological processes is considered vital to successful research projects in the CBE program.

Fundamental to many research projects in this area is the understanding of how biomolecules, cells and cell populations interact in the biomanufacturing environment, and how those molecular-level interactions lead to changes in structure, function, and behavior.  The program encourages highly innovative and potentially transformative engineering research leading to novel bioprocessing and biomanufacturing approaches, and proposals that address emerging research areas and technologies that effectively integrate knowledge and practices from different disciplines while incorporating ongoing research into educational activities.

Major areas of interest in the program include:

•Metabolic engineering and synthetic biology for biomanufacturing

•Quantitative systems biotechnology

•Cell culture technologies

•Protein and enzyme engineering

•Single cell dynamics and modeling in the context of biomanufacturing

•Development of novel "omics" tools for biomanufacturing applications

 

 

NSF: Biophotonics (PD 17-7236)

Due October 20 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505337

The Biophotonics program is part of the Engineering Biology and Health cluster, which includes also 1) Cellular and Biochemical Engineering; 2) Engineering of Biomedical Systems; 3) Nano-Biosensing; and 4) Disability and Rehabilitation Engineering.

The goal of the Biophotonics program is to explore the research frontiers in photonics principles, engineering and technology that are relevant for critical problems in fields of medicine, biology and biotechnology.  Fundamental engineering research and innovation in photonics is required to lay the foundations for new technologies beyond those that are mature and ready for application in medical diagnostics and therapies.  Advances are needed in nanophotonics, optogenetics, contrast and targeting agents, ultra-thin probes, wide field imaging, and rapid biomarker screening. Low cost and minimally invasive medical diagnostics and therapies are key motivating application goals.

Research topics in this program include:

•Macromolecule Markers

•Low Coherence Sensing at the Nanoscale

Neurophotonics

•Micro- & Nano-photonics

Optogenetics

 

 

NSF Environmental Engineering (PD 16-1440)

Due October 20 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505332&WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

The goal of the Environmental Engineering program is to support transformative research which applies scientific and engineering principles to avoid or minimize solid, liquid, and gaseous discharges, resulting from human activities on land, inland and coastal waters, and air, while promoting resource and energy conservation and recovery.  The program also fosters cutting-edge scientific research for identifying, evaluating, and monitoring the waste assimilative capacity of the natural environment and for removing or reducing contaminants from polluted air, water, and soils. Any proposal investigating sensors, materials or devices that does not integrate these products with an environmental engineering activity or area of research may be returned without review.

Major areas of interest include:

•Enhancing the availability of high quality water supplies: Development of innovative biological, chemical and physical treatment processes to meet the growing demand for water; investigation of processes that remove and degrade contaminants, remediate contaminated soil and groundwater, and convert wastewaters into water suitable for reuse; investigation of environmental engineering aspects of urban watersheds, reservoirs, estuaries and storm water management; investigation of biogeochemical and transport processes driving water quality in the aquatic and subsurface environment.  (Please note that water treatment research targeting chemical or physical separation processes (e.g. membranes) should be submitted to the Chemical and Biological Separations Program, CBET 1417).

•Fate and transport of contaminants of emerging concern in air, water, solid waste, and soils: Investigate the fate, transport and remediation of potentially harmful contaminants and their by-products. (Please note that research concerning nanomaterials should be submitted to Biological and Environmental Interactions of Nanoscale Materials, CBET 1179).

 

 

NSF: General & Age-Related Disabilities Engineering (PD 16-5342)

Due October 20 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505335

The General & Age Related Disabilities Engineering (GARDE) program supports fundamental engineering research that will lead to the development of new technologies, devices, or software that improve the quality of life of persons with disabilities. Research may be supported that is directed toward the characterization, restoration, and/or substitution of human functional ability or cognition, or to the interaction of persons with disabilities and their environment. Areas of particular interest are disability-related research in neuroengineering and rehabilitation robotics. Emphasis is placed on significant advancement of fundamental engineering knowledge that facilitates transformative outcomes. We discourage applications that propose incremental improvements. Applicants are encouraged to contact the Program Director prior to submitting a proposal.

GARDE no longer directly supports Undergraduate Engineering Design projects targeting the needs of people with disabilities (PwD), but will rather shift interest to supporting Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REUs) activities focused on improving the quality of life for PwD. These REUs can be funded as supplements to existing GARDE awards or by submitting proposals for REU Sites through NSF 13-542, which will be reviewed in collaboration with the Program Director for the GARDE program.  We encourage those interested in supporting undergraduate student participation in active research focused on improving the quality of life of PwD to apply to the REU program following the respective solicitation guidelines.

Innovative proposals outside of the above specific interest areas may be considered. However, prior to submission, it is recommended that the PI contact the Program Director to avoid the possibility of the proposal being returned without review.

The duration of unsolicited awards generally is one to three years. The typical award size is approximately $100,000 per year.  Proposals requesting a substantially higher amount than this, without prior consultation with the Program Director, may be returned without review.

 

 

NSF Process Systems, Reaction Engineering and Molecular Thermodynamics (PD 18-1417)

Proposals accepted anytime

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505458

The Process Separations program supports research focused on novel methods and materials for separation processes, such as those central to the chemical, biochemical, bioprocessing, materials, energy, and pharmaceutical industries.  A fundamental understanding of the interfacial, transport, and thermodynamic behavior of multiphase chemical systems as well as quantitative descriptions of processing characteristics in the process-oriented industries is critical for efficient resource management and effective environmental protection.  The program encourages proposals that address long standing challenges and emerging research areas and technologies, have a high degree of interdisciplinary work coupled with the generation of fundamental knowledge, and the integration of education and research.

Research topics of particular interest include fundamental molecular-level work on:

--Design of scalable mass separating agents and/or a mechanistic understanding of the interfacial thermodynamics and transport phenomena that relate to purification of gases, chemicals, or water

--Design or improvement of mass separation agents or processes that are based upon, and advance, transport principles

--Downstream purification of biologically derived chemicals for increased throughput

--Field (flow, magnetic, electrical) induced separations and other innovative approaches that address a significant reduction in energy and/or materials requirements in the process industries

 

 

NSF Fluid Dynamics (PD 17-1443)

Due October 20 annually

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=13365

The Fluid Dynamics program is part of the Transport Phenomena cluster, which includes also 1) Combustion and Fire Systems; 2) Particulate and Multiphase Processes; and 3) Thermal Transport Processes.

The Fluid Dynamics program supports fundamental research toward gaining an understanding of the physics of various fluid dynamics phenomenon. Proposed research should contribute to basic scientific understanding via experiments, theoretical developments, and computational discovery. Encouraged are proposals that focus on high Reynolds number turbulence scaling and modeling.

Major areas of interest and activity in the program include:

•Turbulence and Transition: high Reynolds number experiments; large eddy simulation; direct numerical simulation; transition to turbulence; 3-D boundary layers; separated flows; multi-phase turbulent flows; flow control and drag reduction.

•Bio-inspired Fluid Mechanics: fluid-structure interactions; biological flow processes.

•Flow of Complex Fluids: non-Newtonian fluid mechanics; viscoelastic flows.

•Micro- and Nano-fluidics: micro-and nano-scale flow phenomena.

•Interfacial Interactions and Instabilities: hydrodynamic stability; droplet interactions.

•Wind and Ocean Energy Harvesting: focused on fundamental fluid dynamics phenomena associated with renewal energy.

Proposals on wind and ocean energy harvesting and on environmental flows could be submitted to the program when the proposed research is focused on fundamental fluid dynamics phenomena or on development of novel computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approaches, rather than applications or devices and materials. Innovative proposals outside of these specific interest areas may be considered; however, prior to submission, it is recommended that the PI contact the Program Director to avoid the possibility of the proposal being returned without review.

Fluid-Structure Interactions: This is a NSF-AFOSR (Air Force Office of Scientific Research) joint funding area focusing on theory, modeling and/or experiments for high-speed applications. A small number of awards (depending on availability of funds and proposal quality) will be provided, and will be jointly reviewed by NSF and AFOSR using the NSF panel format. Actual funding format and agency split for a particular winning proposal will be determined after the proposal selection process. The AFOSR program that participates in this initiative is the Program on High Speed Aerodynamics (Program Officer: Dr. Ivett Leyva).

 

 

NSF Particulate and Multiphase Processes (PD 17-1415)

Due October 20 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505330

The Particulate and Multiphase Processes program is part of the Transport Phenomena cluster, which includes also 1) Combustion and Fire Systems; 2) Fluid Dynamics; and 3) Thermal Transport Processes.

The goal of the Particulate and Multiphase Processes (PMP) program is to support fundamental research on physico-chemical phenomena that govern particulate and multiphase systems, including flow of suspensions, drops and bubbles, granular and granular-fluid flows, behavior of micro- and nanostructured fluids, and self-assembly/directed-assembly processes that involve particulates. The program encourages transformative research to improve our basic understanding of particulate and multiphase processes with emphasis on research that demonstrates how particle-scale phenomena affect the behavior and dynamics of larger-scale systems. Although proposed research should focus on fundamentals, a clear vision is required that anticipates how results could benefit important applications in advanced manufacturing, energy harvesting, transport in biological systems, biotechnology, or environmental sustainability. Collaborative and interdisciplinary proposals are encouraged, especially those that involve a combination of experiment with theory or modeling. Proposals whose main focus is on the synthesis of particles are not encouraged.

Major research areas of interest in the program include:

•Multiphase flow phenomena: Dynamics of particle/bubble/droplet systems, behavior of structured fluids (colloids/ferro-fluids), granular flows, rheology of multiphase systems, and novel approaches that relate micro- and nanoscale phenomena to macroscale properties and process-level variables.

•Particle science and technology: Aerosols, production of particles and polymer-particle complexes with engineered properties, self-assembly, directed assembly, and template-directed assembly of particles into functional materials and devices.

•Multiphase transport in biological systems: Analysis of physiological processes, applications of functionalized nanostructures in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics.

•Interfacial transport: Dynamics of particles and macromolecules at interfaces, kinetics of adsorption and desorption of nanoparticles and surfactants and their spatial distributions at interfaces, complex molecular interactions at interfaces, formation of interfacial complexes that affect the dynamics of particles.

 

 

NSF Biophotonoics (PD 16-7236)

Due October 20 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505337

The goal of the Biophotonics program is to explore the research frontiers in photonics principles, engineering and technology that are relevant for critical problems in fields of medicine, biology and biotechnology.  Fundamental engineering research and innovation in photonics is required to lay the foundations for new technologies beyond those that are mature and ready for application in medical diagnostics and therapies.  Advances are needed in nanophotonics, optogenetics, contrast and targeting agents, ultra-thin probes, wide field imaging, and rapid biomarker screening. Low cost and minimally invasive medical diagnostics and therapies are key motivating application goals.

Research topics in this program include:

•Macromolecule Markers: Innovative methods for labeling of macromolecules. Novel compositions of matter. Methods of fabrication of multicolor probes that could be used for marking and detection of specific pathological cells. Pushing the envelope of optical sensing to the limits of detection, resolution, and identification.

•Low Coherence Sensing at the Nanoscale: Low coherence enhanced backscattering (LEBS). N-dimensional elastic light scattering. Angle-resolved low coherence interferometry for early cancer detection (dysplasia).

Neurophotonics: Studies of photon activation of neurons at the interface of nanomaterials attached to cells. Development and application of biocompatible photonic tools such as parallel interfaces and interconnects for communicating and control of neural networks.

•Micro- & Nano-photonics: Development and application of novel nanoparticle fluorescent quantum-dots. Sensitive, multiplexed, high-throughput characterization of macromolecular properties of cells. Nanomaterials and nanodevices for biomedicine.

Optogenetics: Novel research in employing light-activated channels and enzymes for manipulation of neural activity with temporal precision.  Utilizing nanophotonics, nanofibers, and genetic techniques for mapping and studying in real-time physiological processes in organs such as the brain and heart.

 

 

NSF Biomedical Engineering (PD 16-5345)

Due October 20 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=501023

The goal of the Biomedical Engineering (BME) program is to provide research opportunities to develop novel ideas into discovery-level and transformative projects that integrate engineering and life sciences in solving biomedical problems that serve humanity in the long-term.  BME projects must be at the interface of engineering and life sciences, and advance both engineering and life sciences.  The projects should focus on high impact transformative methods and technologies. Projects should include methods, models and enabling tools of understanding and controlling living systems; fundamental improvements in deriving information from cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems; new approaches to the design of structures and materials for eventual medical use in the long-term; and novel methods for reducing health care costs through new technologies.

The long-term impact of the projects can be related to fundamental understanding of cell and tissue function, effective disease diagnosis and/or treatment, improved health care delivery, or product development. The BME program does not support clinical studies, or proposals having as their central theme drug design and delivery or the development of biomedical devices that do not include a living biological component.  Furthermore, although research on biomaterials or  cellular biomechanics may constitute a part of the proposed studies, such research cannot be the central theme or key focus area of the proposed work.

 

 

NSF Combustion and Fire Systems (PD 18-1407)

Proposals accepted anytime

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505474

The goal of the Combustion and Fire Systems program is to generate cleaner global and local environments, enhance public safety, improve energy and homeland security, and enable more efficient energy conversion and manufacturing.

The program endeavors to create fundamental scientific knowledge and engineering solutions that are needed to develop useful combustion applications and for mitigating the effects of fire. The program aims to identify and understand the controlling basic principles and use that knowledge to create predictive capabilities for designing and optimizing practical combustion devices. Additional outcomes of interest for this program include: broad-based tools – experimental, theoretical, and computational – which can be applied to a variety of problems in combustion and fire systems; science and technology for clean and efficient generation of power, both stationary and mobile; combustion science and technology for energy-efficient manufacturing; research that enables clean global and local environments (reduction in combustion generated pollutants); enhanced public safety and homeland security through research on fire growth, inhibition and suppression; and education and training of an innovative workforce for power, transportation, and manufacturing industries.

Research areas of interest for this program include:

--Basic Combustion Science: Laminar and turbulent combustion of gas, liquid, and solid fuels in premixed, non-premixed, partially premixed, and homogeneous modes over a broad range of temperatures, pressures and length scales; burning of novel and synthetic fuels; development of predictive models and diagnostic tools.

--Combustion Science Related to Clean Energy: Increasing efficiency and reducing pollution; production and use of renewable fuels; biomass combustion, gasification, and fast pyrolysis; technologies such as oxy-fuel combustion and chemical looping combustion for carbon capture.

--Fire Prevention: Improved understanding of fires to prevent their spread, inhibit their growth, and suppress them.

 

 

NSF Nano-Biosensing (PD 17-7909)

Due October 20 annually

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505340

The Nano-Biosensing program is part of the Engineering Biology and Health cluster, which includes also 1) Cellular and Biochemical Engineering; 2) Engineering of Biomedical Systems; 3) Biophotonics; and 4) Disability and Rehabilitation Engineering.

The Nano-Biosensing program supports fundamental engineering research on devices and methods for measurement and quantification of biological analytes. Proposals that incorporate emerging nanotechnology methods are especially encouraged. Areas of interest include:

•Multi-purpose sensor platforms that exceed the performance of current state-of-the-art devices.

•Novel transduction principles, mechanisms and sensor designs suitable for measurement in practical matrix and sample-preparation-free approaches. These include error-free detection of pathogens and toxins in food matrices, waterborne pathogens, parasites, toxins, biomarkers in body fluids, and others that improve human condition.

•Nano-biosensors that enable measurement of biomolecular interactions in their native states, transmembrane transport, intracellular transport and reactions, and other biological phenomena.

•Studies that examine intracellular measurements must include discussion on the significance of the measurement.

Proposals should clearly identify the proposed problem to be solved, describe why the proposed approach is superior to current available methods, and articulate the benefit of solving the identified problem for the society at large. Sensor designs that yield reliable measurements are encouraged.  While sensitivity is important, it cannot be at the expense of reproducibility. Every application must include research strategies for addressing reproducibility of measurement and sensor response, as well as approaches that reduce errors.  The program does not support applications with incremental improvements of existing approaches and technologies.  Projects that do not include experimental characterization of sensor responses to biological analytes are discouraged, and may be returned without a review. Studies on surface functionalization and immobilization of bio-recognition molecules, and/or orientation of them are not encouraged.  Research that is focused on new recognition chemistry is also discouraged.

 

 

NSF Process Separations (PD 17-1417)

Due October 20 annually

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=13363

The Process Separations program is part of the Chemical Process Systems cluster, which includes also 1) Catalysis; 2) Process Systems, Reaction Engineering, and Molecular Thermodynamics; and 3) Energy for Sustainability.

The Process Separations program supports research focused on novel methods and materials for separation processes, such as those central to the chemical, biochemical, bioprocessing, materials, energy, and pharmaceutical industries.  A fundamental understanding of the interfacial, transport, and thermodynamic behavior of multiphase chemical systems as well as quantitative descriptions of processing characteristics in the process-oriented industries is critical for efficient resource management and effective environmental protection.  The program encourages proposals that address long standing challenges and emerging research areas and technologies, have a high degree of interdisciplinary work coupled with the generation of fundamental knowledge, and the integration of education and research.

Research topics of particular interest include fundamental molecular-level work on:

•Design of scalable mass separating agents and/or a mechanistic understanding of the interfacial thermodynamics and transport phenomena that relate to purification of gases, chemicals, or water

•Design or improvement of mass separation agents or processes that are based upon, and advance, transport principles

•Downstream purification of biologically derived chemicals for increased throughput

•Field (flow, magnetic, electrical) induced separations and other innovative approaches that address a significant reduction in energy and/or materials requirements in the process industries

 

 

NSF: Nano-Bio Phenomena and Processes in the Environment (PD 15-1179)

Proposals will be accepted October 1-20, 2015, and October 1-20 annually after that.

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=501030&WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

This program formerly was known as Environmental Health and Safety of Nanotechnology (nanoEHS). The goal of the Nano-Bio Phenomena and Processes in the Environment (NPPE) program is to support research to further fundamental and quantitative understanding of the interactions of biological and ecological media with nanostructured materials and nanosystems, which include one- to three-dimensional nanostructured materials and heterogeneous nano-bio hybrid assemblies. Such nanostructured materials and systems frequently exhibit novel physical, chemical and biological behavior in living systems and ecological matrices as compared to the bulk scale. This program supports research that explores the interaction of nanoscale materials and systems with both macro and nano-scale systems in biological and environmental media, as well as remediation solutions.

 

 

NSF/DOE Partnership in Basic Plasma Science and Engineering (16-564)

Due October 21, 2016, and the third Friday in October annually after that.

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2016/nsf16564/nsf16564.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click.

The goal of the initiative is to enhance basic plasma research and education in this broad, multidisciplinary field by coordinating efforts and combining resources of the two agencies. The current solicitation also encourages submission of proposals to perform basic plasma experiments at NSF and DOE supported user facilities, such as the Basic Plasma Science Facility at the University of California, Los Angeles and facilities located at DOE national laboratories, designed to serve the needs of the broader plasma community.

Some of the general research areas which are included are:

•Chaos, Turbulence and Self-Organization in Plasmas

•Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems in Plasmas

•Dusty Plasmas

•Non-neutral Plasmas

•Flows and Magnetic Fields in Plasmas, their Interaction and Interpenetration

•Intense Field Matter Interactions in Plasmas

•Advanced Methods for Plasma Modeling and Simulation

•Plasma Diagnostics

•Control of Plasma Processes

•Study of Plasma Reactors for Chemical Production

•Plasma Surface Interactions, Plasma Modification, Synthesis and Processing of Materials

•Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas, Microplasmas, and Plasmas in Environmental Science and Technology

•Astrophysical and Solar Plasmas, Plasmas in Interplanetary Space, Earth and Other Planetary Magnetospheres and Atmospheres

Although the above list is intended to be illustrative, it directly reflects the interests and responsibilities of the NSF Divisions participating in the initiative and the goals of the DOE SC/FES.

 

 

NSF Thermal Transport Processes (PD-17-1406)

Due October 20 annually

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505328&WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

The Thermal Transport Processes program is part of the Transport Phenomena cluster, which includes also 1) Combustion and Fire Systems; 2) Fluid Dynamics; and 3) Particulate and Multiphase Processes.

The Thermal Transport Processes (TTP) program supports engineering research projects that lay the foundation for new discoveries in thermal transport phenomena. These projects should either develop new fundamental knowledge or combine existing knowledge in thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat and mass transfer to probe new areas of innovation. The program seeks transformative projects with the potential for improving our basic understanding, predictability and application of thermal transport processes. Projects should articulate the contribution(s) to the fundamental knowledge supporting thermal transport processes and state clearly the potential application(s) impact when appropriate. Projects that combine analytical, experimental and numerical efforts, geared toward understanding, modeling and predicting thermal phenomena, are of great interest. Collaborative and interdisciplinary proposals for which the main contribution is in thermal transport processes fundamentals are also encouraged.

 

 

NSF Environmental Sustainability (17-7643)

Due October 20 annually

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505338

The Environmental Sustainability program is part of the Environmental Engineering and Sustainability cluster, which includes also 1) Environmental Engineering; and 2) Biological and Environmental Interactions of Nanoscale Materials.

The goal of the Environmental Sustainability program is to promote sustainable engineered systems that support human well-being and that are also compatible with sustaining natural (environmental) systems. These systems provide ecological services vital for human survival. Research efforts supported by the program typically consider long time horizons and may incorporate contributions from the social sciences and ethics. The program supports engineering research that seeks to balance society's need to provide ecological protection and maintain stable economic conditions.

There are four principal general research areas that are supported:

•Industrial Ecology: Topics of interest in Industrial Ecology include advancements in modeling such as life cycle assessment, materials flow analysis, input/output economic models, and novel metrics for measuring sustainable systems. Innovations in industrial ecology are encouraged.

•Green Engineering: Research is encouraged to advance the sustainability of manufacturing processes, green buildings, and infrastructure. Many programs in the Engineering Directorate support research in environmentally benign manufacturing or chemical processes. The Environmental Sustainability program supports research that would affect more than one chemical or manufacturing process or that takes a systems or holistic approach to green engineering for infrastructure or green buildings. Improvements in distribution and collection systems that will advance smart growth strategies and ameliorate effects of growth are research areas that are supported by Environmental Sustainability. Innovations in management of storm water, recycling and reuse of drinking water, and other green engineering techniques to support sustainability may also be fruitful areas for research. NOTE: Water treatment proposals are to be submitted to the CBET Environmental Engineering program (1440), NOT the Environmental Sustainability program (7643).

•Ecological Engineering: Topics should focus on the engineering aspects of restoring ecological function to natural systems. Engineering research in the enhancement of natural capital to foster sustainable development is encouraged.

•Earth Systems Engineering: Earth systems engineering considers aspects of large scale engineering research that involve mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions, adaptation to climate change, and other global scale concerns.

All proposed research should be driven by engineering principles, and be presented explicitly in an environmental sustainability context. Proposals should include involvement in engineering research of at least one graduate student, as well as undergraduates. Incorporation of aspects of social, behavioral, and economic sciences is welcomed. Innovative proposals outside the scope of the four core areas mentioned above may be considered. However, prior to submission, it is recommended that the PI contact the Program Director to avoid the possibility of the proposal being returned without review. For proposals that call for research to be done outside of the United States, an explanation must be presented of the potential benefit of the research for the United States.

 

 

NSF: Environmental Engineering (PD 17-1440)

Due October 20 annually

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505332

The Environmental Engineering program is part of the Environmental Engineering and Sustainability cluster, which includes also 1) Environmental Sustainability; and 2) Biological and Environmental Interactions of Nanoscale Materials.

The goal of the Environmental Engineering program is to support transformative research which applies scientific and engineering principles to avoid or minimize solid, liquid, and gaseous discharges, resulting from human activities on land, inland and coastal waters, and air, while promoting resource and energy conservation and recovery. The program also fosters cutting-edge scientific research for identifying, evaluating, and monitoring the waste assimilative capacity of the natural environment and for removing or reducing contaminants from polluted air, water, and soils. Any proposal investigating sensors, materials or devices that does not integrate these products with an environmental engineering activity or area of research may be returned without review.

Major areas of interest include:

•Enhancing the availability of high quality water supplies: Development of innovative biological, chemical and physical treatment processes to meet the growing demand for water; investigation of processes that remove and degrade contaminants, remediate contaminated soil and groundwater, and convert wastewaters into water suitable for reuse; investigation of environmental engineering aspects of urban watersheds, reservoirs, estuaries and storm water management; investigation of biogeochemical and transport processes driving water quality in the aquatic and subsurface environment. (Please note that water treatment research targeting chemical or physical separation processes (e.g. membranes) should be submitted to the Process Separations Program, CBET 1417).

•Fate and transport of contaminants of emerging concern in air, water, solid waste, and soils: Investigate the fate, transport, and remediation of potentially harmful contaminants and their by-products. (Please note that research concerning nanomaterials should be submitted to Biological and Environmental Interactions of Nanoscale Materials, CBET 1179).

The duration of unsolicited awards is generally one to three years. The typical annual award size for the program is around $110,000 per year. Principal Investigators requesting a higher amount must consult with the Program Director prior to the submission of a proposal, to avoid the possibility of the proposal being returned without review.

 

 

NSF Industry-University Cooperative Research Centers Program (IUCRC) (NSF 17-516)

Pre-proposals accepted October 18, 2017, and the third Wednesday in October annually after that, plus the third Wednesday in April annually

Full proposals accepted December 20, 2017, and the third Wednesday in December annually after that; plus the third Wednesday in June annually

https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf17516

The National Science Foundation has updated its IUCRC program, now Program Solicitation 17-516. The IUCRC program develops long-term partnerships among industry, academe, and government. The Centers are catalyzed by a (very small) grant plus technical support from the NSF and are primarily supported by industry Center members.

Each Center is established to conduct research that is of interest to both the industry members and the Center faculty. An IUCRC contributes to the nation's research infrastructure base and enhances the intellectual capacity of the engineering and science workforce through the integration of research and education. As appropriate, an IUCRC uses international collaborations to advance these goals within the global context.

The PI at any institution participating in an IUCRC proposal must be a tenured faculty member. Waivers for non-tenured personnel or non-faculty personnel may be requested when petitioned by the PI's supervisor (Chairman of the Department or the Dean) in advance of the Preliminary Proposal. The PI must act as the initial Site director. A PI can only have one active IUCRC Site award at any given time.

Preliminary proposals are now mandatory. NSF has also updated its language regarding its goals for the IUCRC program.

UCR’s tech transfer office is available to help develop ideas.

 

 

November

 

 

NSF: Division of Materials Research: Topical Materials Research Programs (DMR-TMRP) (17-580)

Due November 1 annually

https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf17580

The National Science Foundation has released a new program solicitation, 17-580, to replace six standing program descriptions (PDs). The new solicitation is Division of Materials Research: Topical Materials Research Programs (DMR-TMRP). It replaces the PDs for Biomaterials, Condensed Matter Physics, Electronic and Photonic Materials, Metals and Metallic Nanostructures, Polymers, and Solid-State and Materials Chemistry.

NSF expects to make 225 awards of varying sizes from a $55 million pool under this solicitation.

Through this solicitation, investigators may submit only one proposal across DMR to any of the Topical Materials Research Programs as PI or co-PI during the annual proposal acceptance window. This includes proposals under GOALI, RUI/ROA, and binational collaborative research programs. Proposals for EAGER, RAPID, RAISE, and conferences, as well as supplements to existing grants, are not subject to this limitation and may be submitted anytime after consultation with and approval from the cognizant Program Officer.

Administratively, there is one highly unusual requirement in the current and pending section of the proposal: For each current award or pending proposal listed, investigators are requested to include one or more sentences addressing the relationship of the present proposal to their currently funded projects or pending proposals and explaining how the work proposed under this solicitation is distinct.

 

 

NSF: Energy, Power, Control, and Networks  (EPCN) (PD-18-7607)

The ECCS proposal submission window is October 1 to November 1 annually. Requests for supplements are accepted April 2, 2018, and April 1 annually after that.

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505249

EPCN supports innovative research in modeling, optimization, learning, adaptation, and control of networked multi-agent systems, higher-level decision making, and dynamic resource allocation, as well as risk management in the presence of uncertainty, sub-system failures, and stochastic disturbances. EPCN also invests in novel machine learning algorithms and analysis, adaptive dynamic programming, brain-like networked architectures performing real-time learning, and neuromorphic engineering. EPCN’s goal is to encourage research on emerging technologies and applications including energy, transportation, robotics, and biomedical devices & systems. EPCN also emphasizes electric power systems, including generation, transmission, storage, and integration of renewable energy sources into the grid; power electronics and drives; battery management systems; hybrid and electric vehicles; and understanding of the interplay of power systems with associated regulatory & economic structures and with consumer behavior.

 

 

NSF Electronics, Photonics, and Magnetic Devices (PD-18-1517)

The ECCS proposal submission window is October 1 to November 1 annually. Requests for supplements are due April 2, 2018, and April 1 annually after that.

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505250

EPMD supports innovative research on novel devices based on the principles of electronics, optics and photonics, optoelectronics, magnetics, opto- and electromechanics, electromagnetics, and related physical phenomena. EPMD’s goal is to advance the frontiers of micro-, nano- and quantum-based devices operating within the electromagnetic spectrum and contributing to a broad range of application domains including information and communications, imaging and sensing, healthcare, Internet of Things, energy, infrastructure, and manufacturing. The program encourages research based on emerging technologies for miniaturization, integration, and energy efficiency as well as novel material-based devices with new functionalities, improved efficiency, flexibility, tunability, wearability, and enhanced reliability.

 

 

NSF: Communications, Circuits, and Sensing-Systems  (CCSS) (PD-18-7564)

The ECCS submission window is October 1 to November 1 annually. Requests for supplements are accepted  April 2, 2018, and April 1 annually after that.

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505248

. This program supports innovative research in circuit and system hardware and signal processing techniques. CCSS also supports system and network architectures for communications and sensing to enable the next-generation cyber-physical systems (CPS) that leverage computation, communication, and sensing integrated with physical domains. CCSS invests in micro- and nano-electromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS), physical, chemical, and biological sensing systems, neurotechnologies, and communication & sensing circuits and systems. The goal is to create new complex and hybrid systems ranging from nano- to macro-scale with innovative engineering principles and solutions for a variety of applications including but not limited to healthcare, medicine, environmental and biological monitoring, communications, disaster mitigation, homeland security, intelligent transportation, manufacturing, energy, and smart buildings. CCSS encourages research proposals based on emerging technologies and applications for communications and sensing such as high-speed communications of terabits per second and beyond, sensing and imaging covering microwave to terahertz frequencies, personalized health monitoring and assistance, secured wireless connectivity and sensing for the Internet of Things, and dynamic-data-enabled autonomous systems through real-time sensing and learning.

 

 

NSF: CISE Research Infrastructure (CRI) (17-581)

Pre-proposals are required, and there should be no substantive changes between the pre-proposal and the full proposal.  Pre-proposals are due November 02, 2017,     November 07, 2018, and the first Wednesday in November annually after that. Full proposals will be due January 11, 2018, January 10, 2019, and the second Thursday in January annually after that.

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17581/nsf17581.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

The CRI program supports two classes of awards:

-- Institutional Infrastructure (II) awards support the creation of new (II-NEW) CISE research infrastructure or the enhancement (II-EN) of existing CISE research infrastructure to enable world-class CISE research opportunities at the awardee and collaborating institutions. The proposed research infrastructure must enable compelling new research opportunities for the proposing PI or team of PIs and associated students and collaborators (i.e., for individuals at the awardee and collaborating institutions). II proposals involving multiple investigators from one or more departments and/or institutions are welcome. Projects must include substantial involvement of CISE researchers and enable projects with a clear research focus related to the core CISE disciplines. The majority of the II awards will be made in the $200,000 - $750,000 range, though a small number of II awards may be made in the $750,000 - $1,000,000 range.

-- Community Infrastructure (CI) awards support four types of projects: planning, new, enhancement, and sustainment to enable world-class CISE research opportunities for broad-based communities of CISE researchers that extend well beyond the awardee institutions. Each CI award may support the operation of such infrastructure, ensuring that the awardee institution(s) is (are) well positioned to provide a high quality of service to CISE community researchers expected to use the infrastructure to realize their research goals. The majority of the CI awards will be made in the $500,000 - $1,000,000 range, though a very small number of CI awards may be made in the $1,000,000 - $2,000,000 range. The majority of the Community Infrastructure Planning (CI-P) awards will be made in the $50,000 - $100,000 range.

     •CI Planning (CI-P): Will fund grants of up to $100,000 for durations of up to 1.5 years to prepare for the submission of a CI-NEW or CI-EN proposal.

     •CI New (CI-NEW): Will fund grants of up to $2 million for durations of up to 3 years to create new CISE research infrastructure (NSF will provide no more than $250,000 per year for operating the infrastructure).

     •CI Enhancement (CI-EN): Will fund grants of up to $2 million for durations of up to 3 years to enhance existing CISE research infrastructure (NSF will provide no more than $250,000 per year for operating the infrastructure).

     •CI Sustainability (CI-SUSTAIN): Will fund grants of up to $1 million for durations of up to 3 years to provide, for an existing infrastructure that is of value to the community, resources for (a) continued operation and (b) the implementation of a credible plan for achieving community sustainability at the end of the 3 years of funding (NSF will provide no more than $250,000 per year for operating the infrastructure). Projects that have received prior CI-EN awards (or legacy awards such as CI-ADDO-EN) must use this route for continued CRI funding. Resources that receive a CI-SUSTAIN award are not eligible for any future funding from the CRI program.

A university or organization may submit no more than three Institutional Infrastructure (II) proposals per competition. There is no limit on Community Infrastructure (CI) proposals per competition. An individual investigator may be involved in no more than two CRI proposals per year. I will touch base with RED on whether we need to do a formal limited submission process for this.

 

 

Army: Power and Energy Soldiers for Soldier, Mobile, and Tactical Grid Applications (W56KGU-15-R-0032)

Open to November 3, 2020

https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity&mode=form&tab=core&id=b0369c44a7416b0fe8041cae9414faa3

The U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center invites concept papers (up to 10 pages) for new ideas in energy generation, distribution, and storage in the field. The Army will accept ideas under this program until November 3, 2020; it will invite full proposals if it likes your concept.

Note that this program is aimed at making contracts rather than grants. The orientation is more toward testing and delivery than on research as we typically think of it. Also, we will want to be sure that the Army understands that we can’t engage in classified or export-controlled work. These are matters that we can address in a concept paper and before we submit a full proposal.

Here are the topic areas:

Research Interest:  Electrochemical Based Portable Power Source

1.  Rechargeable Batteries

2. Primary (Disposable) Batteries

3.  Ultracapacitors

Research Interest:  Fuel Based Portable Power Sources

1.  Fuel Cell Technologies

2.  Advanced Power Systems (250 W to 100 kW)

3.  Advanced Materials for Power Systems Performance

4.  Data Acquisition Systems

5.  Power Assessment with Software

6.  Modeling/Simulation and Assessment of Advanced Power Sources for Tactical Fields

7.  Survey of Stationary and Mobile Power Systems, Alternative Energy and Environmental Control Units (ECU)

8.  Advanced Energy Storage Batteries for Grid Configuration

9.  Co-Generation ECU

10.  Small Lightweight External Combustion Power Sources (250W - 3 kW)

11.  50-200 W Thermoelectric Power Source Demonstrator

12.  150 - 500 W Thermoelectric Generator Demonstrator

13.  Advanced Power Electronics/Power Management

Research Interest:  Power & Energy Systems including Alternative Energy Power Sources

1. Hybrid Power Systems

2. Renewable Energy Sources

3. Battery Chargers

4. Power Management/Smart Grid

5. Soldier Worn Fueled Systems

 

 

NIH: BRAIN Initiative: Tools to Facilitate High-Throughput Microconnectivity Analysis (R01) (RFA-MH-18-805)

Due December 7, 2017 and November 13, 2018. Letters of intent are requested 30 days before submission.

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-MH-18-505.html#_Part_1._Overview

This program will support development and validation of novel tools to facilitate the detailed analysis of brain microconnectivity. The primary goal is to provide techniques and resources for understanding and delineating the structure of complex circuits at the level of synaptic connections, alone or in combination with methods for identifying important cellular and circuit features, for example, for classifying or characterizing cellular or synaptic phenotypes. 

This FOA seeks applications in areas including, but not limited to:

• Novel methods for tagging individual neurons such that cellular components of a functional circuit can be explored.

• Novel trans-synaptic tracers that can be used both at the EM and light-microscopic level.

• Innovative approaches to reduce the time and cost of determining high resolution synaptic connectivity by electron microscopy or other approaches.

• Novel computational approaches to analyze and segment neuronal connections from various imaging modalities. 

• Novel techniques for integrating micro-scale connectivity data with cellular or synaptic phenotypic information.

• Novel uses of super-resolution light microscopic approaches for identifying synaptic connections and mapping micro-circuits.

• Tools to identify gap junctions and characterize electrical synapses.

• Software tools for enhancing and scaling automated image processing, connectivity analysis, and data interpretation, including algorithms, information extraction routines, and user interfaces

• Datasets to serve as ground-truth for algorithm development and testing

• Develop a highquality toolbox of methods for efficiently mapping and annotating projections in experimental animals, including nonhuman primates, as well as in human tissue blocks.

• Methods to reduce the time needed to segment and/or analyze images from volume EM data sets

• Proof-of-principle demonstrations or reference datasets consisting of reconstructions of microconnectomes of individual animals, for example, demonstrating microconnectivity of cells that have been studied using optical physiology during specific behaviors. 

• Techniques for using electron and/or superresolution light microscopy to integrate molecular signatures of cells and synapses with their nanoscale connectivity.

NIH expects to make 3-7 awards from a $4 million pool. Proposals are due December 7, 2017 and November 13, 2018. Letters of intent are requested 30 days before submission.

 

 

NSF Integrated Earth Systems (15-600)

Due November 14 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15600/nsf15600.htm

IES is a program in the Division of Earth Sciences (EAR) that focuses specifically on the continental, terrestrial and deep Earth subsystems of the whole Earth system. Overall, the goals of IES are to:

•provide opportunity for collaborative, multidisciplinary research into the operation, dynamics and complexity of Earth systems at a budgetary scale between that of a typical project in the EAR Division's disciplinary programs and larger scale initiatives at the Directorate or Foundation level;

•support study of Earth systems that builds on process-oriented knowledge gained from EAR programmatic research and enables systems-level hypothesis testing and analysis of coupled processes;

•provide a "bridge" among the EAR disciplinary programs in order to foster the exchange of questions, ideas, and knowledge between disciplinary discovery and system-level investigations.

 

 

NSF EarthScope (15-578)

Due November 13, 2015; November 15 annually after that

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15578/nsf15578.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&amp

EarthScope is an Earth science program to explore the 4-dimensional structure of the North American continent. The EarthScope Program provides a framework for broad, integrated studies across the Earth sciences, including research on fault properties and the earthquake process, strain transfer, magmatic and hydrous fluids in the crust and mantle, plate boundary processes, large-scale continental deformation, continental structure and evolution, and composition and structure of the deep Earth. In addition, EarthScope offers a centralized forum for Earth science education at all levels and an excellent opportunity to develop cyberinfrastructure to integrate, distribute, and analyze diverse data sets.

This program will support projects that make use of recently established EarthScope resources: the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD), the  Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and EarthScope (GAGE) facility, and the Seismological Facilities for the Advancement of Geosciences and EarthScope (SAGE).

Proposals are invited that will provide standardized data, visualization and analysis tools, and data integration products to the scientific and education communities. Pilot projects or prototype development for producing and distributing data products such as multi-parameter models derived from integrated analyses, etc. are also encouraged.

The EarthScope program invites proposals that facilitate integration and synthesis of major outcomes of EarthScope research and education and outreach efforts. The program encourages a broad array of integration and synthesis proposals with the goal of elucidating and documenting the advances that the EarthScope program has made since its inception. Examples of possible types of proposals could include, but are not limited to:

-- Proposals for projects that synthesize major outcomes from EarthScope research, such as conferences, the development of formal or informal educational modules, or other activities that demonstrate the progress that EarthScope has made in advancing knowledge;

-- Proposals for projects that integrate multiple data sets and analyses from one or more regions of the continent with the goal of providing a comprehensive perspective on a scientific target outlined in the EarthScope Science Plan, including making new insights on Earth processes and identifying current knowledge gaps; and/or

-- Proposals for projects that develop community model products that could be used to advance further research.

NSF expects to make 15-25 awards from a $6 million pool. There is a limit of two proposals per investigator.

 

 

NSF Mathematical Biology (PD-12-7334)

Proposals accepted November 1-15 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5690

The Mathematical Biology Program supports research in areas of applied and computational mathematics with relevance to the biological sciences. Successful proposals are mathematically innovative and address challenging problems of interest to members of the biological community. Projects may include development of mathematical concepts and tools traditionally seen in other disciplinary programs within the Division of Mathematical Sciences, e.g., topology, probability, statistics, and computation.

 

 

NSF East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes for U.S. Graduate Students (EAPSI) (13-593)

Due second Thursday in November annually

http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf13593

An EAPSI award provides U.S. graduate students in science, engineering, and education: 1) first-hand research experiences in Australia, China, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Singapore, or Taiwan; 2) an introduction to the science, science policy, and scientific infrastructure of the respective location; and 3) an orientation to the society, culture, and language. It is expected that EAPSI awards will help students initiate professional relationships to enable future collaboration with foreign counterparts.

 

 

NSF: Integrated Earth Systems (NSF 16-589)

Due November 16 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf16589

This program will make an estimated 4-10 awards from a pool of up to $9.5 million. The largest award will be $3 million over five years. The goal of the Integrated Earth Systems (IES) program is to investigate the interplay among the continental, terrestrial, and interior systems of the planet. The program provides an opportunity for collaborative, multidisciplinary research into the operation, dynamics, and complexity of Earth systems that encompass the core of the Earth through the surface. Innovative projects that explore new research directions beyond those typically considered by core programs of the Division of Earth Sciences (EAR) are encouraged.

IES projects are expected to involve collaborations among investigators from different EAR disciplinary specialties. IES welcomes collaborations with researchers outside the disciplinary boundaries of EAR to help address questions related to Earth systems in line with IES goals.

 

 

NSF et al: Collaborative Research in Computational Neuroscience (18-501)

due January 5, 2018, November 27, 2018, and November 25, 2019

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2018/nsf18501/nsf18501.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

The National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, and counterpart agencies in France, Germany, Israel, and Japan have released NSF 18-501, Collaborative Research in Computational Neuroscience. The program will support collaborative activities that will advance the understanding of nervous system structure and function, mechanisms underlying nervous system disorders, and computational strategies used by the nervous system. Two classes of proposals will be considered in response to this solicitation: (1)

Research Proposals describing collaborative research projects, and (2) Data Sharing Proposals to enable sharing of data and other resources.

NSF expects to make 15-25 awards per year from a pool of $5 million to $20 million. Projects are expected to be between $100,000 and $250,000 of direct costs per year for 3-5 years.

An individual may be involved in no more than two proposals per year. International collaborations are not required.

The driving principle behind this program is the recognition that projects crossing traditional academic disciplinary boundaries often bring about increased productivity, creativity, and capacity to tackle major challenges. Collaborative efforts that bring together investigators with complementary experience and training, and deep understanding of multiple scholarly fields, are a requirement for this program and must be convincingly demonstrated in the proposal. A typical research collaboration might involve a computer scientist and a neurobiologist, for example, though note that this solicitation does not prescribe any particular mix of disciplinary backgrounds or scientific approaches. Proposals for research projects should describe collaborations that bring together the complementary expertise needed to achieve significant advances on challenging interdisciplinary problems. Proposals for data sharing should describe resources that respond to the needs of a broad community of investigators to enable wide-ranging research advances.

 

 

December

 

 

 

Earth Sciences: Instrumentation and Facilities program (NSF 16-609)

Proposals accepted anytime

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2016/nsf16609/nsf16609.htm

The National Science Foundation has updated its Earth Sciences: Instrumentation and Facilities program, now NSF 16-609. This program supports requests for infrastructure that promotes research and education in the areas currently supported by the Division of Earth Sciences. EAR/IF will consider proposals for (1) Acquisition or Upgrade of Research Equipment that will advance laboratory and field investigations and student research training opportunities in the Earth sciences; (2) Development of New Instrumentation, Techniques or Software that will extend current research and research training capabilities in the Earth sciences; and (3) Community Facility Support to make complex and expensive instruments, systems of instruments or services broadly available to the Earth science research and student communities.

EAR/IF anticipates approximately $6,000,000 will be available annually for 30-50 new awards.

 

 

NSF: Integrative Strategies for Understanding Neural and Cognitive Systems (NCS) (18-533)

Foundations: LOI February 20, 2018, January 8, 2019, January 8, 2020. Full proposals April 17, 2018, February 26, 2019, February 26, 2020

Frontiers, LOI December 7, 2018. Full proposal February 26, 2019.

Core+ supplements, proposals due April 17, 2018, February 26, 2019, February 26, 2020.

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2018/nsf18533/nsf18533.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_179

This is the update to NSF’s Understanding the Brain program.

The program has four major research themes and three classes of awards. The research themes are:

1. Neuroengineering and Brain-Inspired Concepts and Designs

2. Individuality and Variation

3. Cognitive and Neural Processes in Realistic, Complex Environments

4. Data-Intensive Neuroscience and Cognitive Science

The project classes:

FOUNDATIONS awards (CISE, EHR, ENG, and SBE Directorates; referred to as INTEGRATIVE FOUNDATIONS in earlier NCS solicitations) will support high-risk, high-payoff projects that advance the foundations of one or more NCS focus areas. Teams of two or more investigators with distinct but complementary expertise are required. Proposals must demonstrate the transformative potential of the work to be funded and situate it within a broader intellectual context of work to which it will connect and contribute. Each proposal must present a multidisciplinary research plan, a proactive strategy for maximizing the project’s impact, and a discussion of potentially transformative payoffs from pursuit of a scientifically risky question or approach and associated issues of feasibility and contingencies. A FOUNDATIONS project may, as appropriate, explicitly build on another associated project or projects (see Collaboration and Coordination section of the solicitation) to synergistically advance its scientific goals. Total budgets for FOUNDATIONS awards will typically range from a total of $500,000 to $1,000,000 (including direct and indirect costs), with durations of 2 to 4 years.

The NCS program also welcomes proposals for smaller FOUNDATIONS projects (typically requesting less than $250,000) that would lead to ambitious new research agendas via: (1) achievement of technical proof-of-concept, on which a broader set of further research goals depends; or (2) critical synthesis (e.g., meta-analysis) and/or convening of communities/literatures that have not sufficiently been brought into productive contact. It is expected that such activities could serve as the basis for larger future projects. Investigators wishing to propose smaller FOUNDATIONS projects are advised to discuss their project ideas with an NCS program officer.

FRONTIERS awards (CISE, EHR, ENG, and SBE Directorates; FY2019 competition only) will support ambitious, highly integrative, interdisciplinary projects requiring larger teams of investigators engaged in a sustained synergistic effort. These projects will advance and connect multiple integrative research threads to tackle challenges that, without a high level of collaboration and coordination, would remain intractable. The expectations for individual research threads are similar to FOUNDATIONS: high-risk, high-payoff research efforts that will advance the foundations of one or more NCS focus areas. FRONTIERS projects will coordinate component efforts toward larger shared challenges, such that the value of the coordinated whole greatly exceeds the sum of its parts. Each FRONTIERS proposal must articulate a transformative vision that will drive the coordinated effort and show how the project will provide national and global leadership, contributing to a broad scientific community or communities. Discussion of potential payoffs and risks must cover the project as a whole as well as each component research thread. NCS FRONTIERS projects are strongly encouraged to build on other associated projects and must include an advisory board (see Collaboration and Coordination, below).

For the first competition in FY2019, NSF anticipates making 3 to 5 FRONTIERS awards with durations of up to 5 years subject to the availability of funds. NSF anticipates that proposing investigator teams will develop a wide range of strategies to address the expectations for FRONTIERS outlined above; thus, hard limits have not been set on the budget range for individual projects. It is anticipated that approximately $11 to $15 million will be made available in FY2019 for NCS awards, including FRONTIERS and other classes.

Prospective FRONTIERS applicants are strongly encouraged to attend an NCS webinar, which will be announced on the program web site, https://www.nsf.gov/ncs, in September, 2018.

CORE+ SUPPLEMENTS (CISE, EHR, and ENG Directorates) will provide additional support to existing funded projects in the participating directorates, to enable activities that will connect those projects to significant new integrative opportunities in neural and cognitive systems. These supplements are intended to build on NSF-funded projects in other disciplines, to bring new approaches or capabilities emerging from other fields into cognitive science, neuroscience, and neuroengineering, or to enable other kinds of synergistic connections that will advance one or more NCS focus areas. Investigators holding an existing award managed by CISE, EHR, or ENG may submit a post-award request for supplemental funding of up to 20% of the existing award, not to exceed $200,000. Before submitting a supplement request, PIs should contact the cognizant program officer of the existing award and the directorate contact listed in Section VIII of this solicitation. This should be done in advance of the target date listed on this solicitation's cover page to receive full consideration.

An individual may participate as PI, Co-PI, or Senior Personnel on only one full proposal per year in response to this solicitation.

 

 

NSF/NIH Smart and Connected Health (NSF 18-541)

Due May 22, 2018, December 11, 2018, and December 11 annually after that

https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf18541

The National Science Foundation and several components of the National Institutes of Health have released a significantly revised solicitation for Smart and Connected Health, now NSF Program Solicitation 18-541. The purpose of this program is to develop next-generation multidisciplinary science that encourages existing and new research communities to focus on breakthrough ideas in a variety of areas of value to health, such as networking, pervasive computing, advanced analytics, sensor integration, privacy and security, modeling of socio-behavioral and cognitive processes and system and process modeling. Effective solutions must satisfy a multitude of constraints arising from clinical/medical needs, barriers to change, heterogeneity of data, semantic mismatch and limitations of current cyberphysical systems and an aging population. Such solutions demand multidisciplinary teams ready to address issues ranging from fundamental science and engineering to medical and public health practice.

The purpose of this interagency program solicitation is to support the development of technologies, analytics and models supporting next generation health and medical research through high-risk, high-reward advances in computer and information science, engineering and technology, behavior and cognition. Collaborations between academic, industry, and other organizations are strongly encouraged to establish better linkages between fundamental science, medicine and healthcare practice and technology development, deployment and use.

Awards will be up to $300,000 (total, including indirect) per year for up to four years. The sponsors expect to make 8-11 awards per cycle. An individual may be involved in no more than two proposals. (They don’t say two proposals per cycle, but I think that is what they mean. Just win on your first try, and we won’t have to ask.)

At NSF, the CISE and ENG directorates are the sponsors. At NIH, the participating institutes are Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, National Cancer Institute, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institute on Aging, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and National Library of Medicine.

 

 

NSF: Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (17-590)

Design & Development Due December 12, 2017 and December 11, 2018. Exploration & Design are accepted year-round.

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17590/nsf17590.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

This program will make five types of awards in two broad classes:

Engaged Student Learning: Exploration and Design (up to $300,000 over three years), Development and Implementation-Level 1 (up to $600,000 over three years), and Development and Implementation-Level 2 (up to $2 million over up to 5 years). Engaged Student Learning projects focus on design, development, and research studies that involve the creation, exploration, or implementation of tools, resources, and models that show particular promise for increasing the engagement of undergraduate students in their STEM learning and lead to measurable and lasting learning gains.

Institutional and Community Transformation: Exploration and Design (up to $300,000 over three years) and Development and Implementation (up to $3 million over up to five years). Institutional and Community Transformation projects use innovative approaches to increase the use of highly effective, evidence-based STEM teaching and learning, curricular, and co-curricular practices in institutions of higher education or across/within disciplinary communities. These projects may be proposed by an institution or set of institutions; alternatively, community proposals may be submitted through professional communities, including discipline-based professional societies and networks or organizations that represent institutions of higher education. Projects are expected to be both evidence-based and knowledge-generating.

All projects must support the following IUSE: EHR goals:

• use and build evidence about improved STEM instructional practices;

design and study innovative learning opportunities, including cyber-learning;

• create, implement, and test program, curricular, course, and technology-driven models;

• develop, implement, and test creative approaches for adoption of education research into disciplinary teaching;

• demonstrate effectiveness of validated practices in a variety of institutional settings;

• develop and validate assessments/metrics for undergraduate STEM learning and instructional practice; and

• conduct fundamental research on issues of undergraduate STEM teaching and learning.

All projects are expected to generate new knowledge through an educational research study that poses one or more significant questions and uses a research design that permits direct investigation of the questions.

 

 

Federal Aviation Administration Grants for Aviation Research (FAA-12-01)

Open to December 2019

http://www07.grants.gov/search/search.do?&mode=VIEW&oppId=134953 (click on Application at the top-right of the screen, and then the “download” link under Instructions and Application, and then download the instructions)

The Federal Aviation Administration has released Program Solicitation FAA-12-01, Grants for Aviation Research. This program will accept proposals on an ongoing basis through December 2019 in the following nine areas. The solicitation elaborates on each of these areas.

1. Capacity and Air Traffic Control Technology

2. Communications, Navigation, and Surveillance

3. Aviation Weather

4. Airports

5. Aircraft Safety Technology

6. Human Factors and Aviation Medicine

7. Environment and Energy

8. Systems Science/Operations Research

9. Commercial Space Transportation

Cost sharing is strongly encouraged and will be an evaluation criterion.

 

 

Air Force Research Laboratory: Directed Energy and Space Vehicles (BAA-RVKV-2015-0003)

Open to December 2021

http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=280237 (then click through the “Package” tab to download the Instructions, the actual BAA.)

. This BAA will be open for five years to accept proposals from academic institutions in the following topic areas. No funding is currently available through this BAA, so it’s the kind of thing where you need to find a champion with AFRL, and then they can figure out a way to get the money. You can go ahead and submit a proposal in response to this opportunity, but its chances will not be good unless you already have someone inside AFRL waiting for it.

The objective of this effort is to establish a combined AFRL RD/RV University Cooperative Agreement vehicle to efficiently award research funds to universities. These efforts will investigate new concepts as well as the ancillary supporting technologies for directed energy and space vehicles and to enhance theoretical analyses, exploratory studies, or experiments conducted by educational institutions; important for technological advance and innovative activities in which educational institutions have limited resources.

Directed Energy:

1. Lasers

2. Aero-effects and Airborne Beam Control

3. High-power Microwaves

4. Weapons Modeling & Simulation

5. Space Domain Awareness

6. Optics and Beam Control

7. Laser Guide Stars

8. Sensors

9. Optical System Modeling and Simulation

10. Quantum Computer Technology

Space Vehicles:

1. Structures

2. Space Power

3. Communications Guidance Navigation and Control:

4. Space Sensors

5. Multisensory Information Fusion

6. Thermal Management

7. Electronics/Radiation Effects/Protection

8. Space Environment

9. Space System Modeling and Simulation

10. Quantum Technologies

This program is designed for academic institutions, but it is possible that projects can go beyond the Fundamental level, into areas where export control or International Trafficking in Arms Regulations apply. We need to be careful that any project we propose is all Fundamental Research, generally synonymous with basic research.

 

 

January

 

Army Corps of Engineers broad agency announcement (W912HZ-18-BAA-01)

Open to at least January 29, 2019

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=300459

The Army Corps of Engineers, which operates the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, has released its annual broad agency announcement, now W912HZ-18-BAA-01. This lengthy document describes research interests in the areas listed below. It’s too much for me to summarize, so I encourage you to take a look and see if there are opportunities for you.

Conference & Symposia Grants

Coastal & Hydraulics Laboratory

Geotechnical & Structures Laboratory

Environmental Laboratory

Information Technology Laboratory

Construction Engineering Research Laboratory

Cold Regions Research & Engineering Laboratory

Geospatial Research Laboratory

Reachback Operations Center

As with other Department of Defense BAAs, you start off by bringing your idea to the relevant program officer, and they will invite a full proposal if they like your idea and have the money. The BAA will remain open for at least one year.

 

 

 

February

 

NATO: Science for Peace and Security

Proposals accepted anytime; reviews take place February 1 and May 15

http://www.nato.int/cps/en/natolive/87260.htm

NATO has released its solicitation for the Science for Peace and Security program. This program makes three-year awards to facilitate international collaborations in areas of interest to NATO. Funds can be used for equipment, travel, training, short-term consultants, and stipends for young investigators. Funds may not be used for salaries, tuition, research costs, or overhead.

Every project must involve at least one PI from a NATO member company (that’s us) and at least one from a “NATO partner” country: Afghanistan*, Algeria*, Armenia*, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan*, Bahrain, Belarus*, Bosnia and Herzegovina*, Egypt*, Finland, Georgia*, Iraq*, Ireland, Israel, Japan, Jordan*, Kazakhstan*, Kuwait, Kyrgyz Republic*, Malta, Mauritania*, Moldova*, Mongolia*, Montenegro*, Morocco*, New Zealand, Pakistan*, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Serbia*, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan*, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia†*, Tunisia*, Turkmenistan*, Ukraine*, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan*. Young researchers from partner countries indicated with * are eligible for SPS-funded stipends. Young researchers from NATO countries may be eligible on a case-by-case basis.

Roughly half of the budget is generally allocated to equipment, ~20% to training and travel, and up to 15% to stipends. These proportions are meant as guidelines only, not fixed limits, and will vary according to the needs of each project. If you intend to request more than 400,000 euros, you need to talk to a program officer first.

Topic areas of interest are:

1)         Facilitate mutually beneficial cooperation on issues of common interest, including international efforts to meet emerging security challenges

a)         Counter-Terrorism

i)          Methods for the protection of critical infrastructure, supplies and personnel

ii)          Human factors in the defence against terrorism

iii)         Detection technologies against the terrorist threat for explosive devices and other illicit activities

iv)         Risk management, best practices and technologies in response to terrorism.

b)         Energy Security

i)          Innovative energy solutions for the military; battlefield energy solutions; renewable energy solutions with military applications;

ii)          Energy infrastructure security;

iii)         Maritime aspects of energy security;

iv)         Technological aspects of energy security.

c)         Cyber Defence

i)          Critical infrastructure protection, including sharing of best practices, capacity building and policies;

ii)          Support in developing cyber defence capabilities, including new technologies and support to the construction of information technology infrastructure;

iii)         Cyber defence situation awareness.

d)         Defence against CBRN Agents

i)          Methods and technology regarding the protection against, diagnosing effects, detection, decontamination, destruction, disposal and containment of CBRN agents;

ii)          Risk management and recovery strategies and technologies;

iii)         Medical countermeasures against CBRN agents.

e)         Environmental Security

i)          Security issues arising from key environmental and resource constraints, including health risks, climate change, water scarcity and increasing energy needs, which have the potential to significantly affect NATO’s planning and operations;

ii)          Disaster forecast and prevention of natural catastrophes;

iii)         Defence-related environmental issues.

 2)         Enhance support for NATO-led operations and missions

a)         Provision of civilian support through SPS Key Priorities;

b)         Provision of access to information through internet connectivity as in the SILK-Afghanistan Programme;

c)         Cultural and social aspects in military operations and missions;

d)         Enhancing cooperation with other international actors.

 3)         Enhance awareness on security developments including through early warning, with a view to preventing crises

a)         Security-related Advanced Technology:

Emerging technologies including nanotechnology, optical technology, micro satellites, metallurgy and the development of UAV platforms.

b)         Border and Port Security

i)          Border and port security technology;

ii)          Cross border communication systems and data fusion;

iii)         Expert advice and assessments of border security needs and best practice.

c)         Mine and Unexploded Ordnance Detection and Clearance

i)          Development and provision of advanced technologies, methodologies and best practice;

ii)          Solutions to counter improvised explosive devices (IED).

 4)         Human and Social Aspects of Security related to NATO’s strategic objectives

 5)         Any project related clearly linked to a threat to security not otherwise defined in these priorities may also be considered for funding under the SPS Programme. Such proposals will be examined for links to NATO’s Strategic Objectives.

 

 

NSF/DOE: Algorithms for Modern Power Systems (AMPS)

Due February 13, 2017, and the second Monday in February annually after that.

https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?WT.z_pims_id=505322&ods_key=nsf17521

Note that this is from the NSF Division of Mathematical Sciences, not engineering, so maybe you want to talk to your friends in Math or Statistics about teaming up.

This program will make an estimated 4-10 awards from a $1.2 million pool to develop the next generation of mathematical and statistical algorithms for improvement of the security, reliability, and efficiency of the modern power grid. Because the complicated nature of the power grid itself presents a major barrier to its modeling and simulation, the AMPS program aims to catalyze fruitful collaborative research projects to develop mathematical and statistical tools needed to address operational and planning issues for the power grid. The program encourages interdisciplinary efforts, with the involvement of experts in a variety of disciplines such as power system engineering, mathematics, statistics, and financial mathematics.

Research topics could include, but are not limited to: new statistical and uncertainty-analysis-based methods that provide probabilistic or robust performance guarantees accounting for uncertainty and fluctuations in loads, generation, and other components of the system; methods for characterizing and controlling resiliency and reliability; probabilistic approaches to manage risk and uncertainty, uncertainty quantification; model reduction; model validation; anomaly detection; data analytics; risk hedging; network theory; and computational methods that are scalable without sacrificing performance.

 

 

NSF/DOE: Algorithms for Modern Power Systems (AMPS) (NSF 17-521)

Due February 17, 2017, and second Monday of February after that

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17521/nsf17521.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

This program will make 4-10 awards from a $1.2 million pool for research to develop the next generation of mathematical and statistical algorithms for improvement of the security, reliability, and efficiency of the modern power grid. The sponsor in NSF is the Division of Mathematical Sciences, so this might be a good cue that you want to work with someone from Statistics or Math.

The AMPS program will support research projects that aim to address mathematical and statistical challenges relating to the complexity of the electrical grid. Because the complicated nature of the power grid itself presents a major barrier to its modeling and simulation, the AMPS program aims to catalyze fruitful collaborative research projects to develop mathematical and statistical tools needed to address operational and planning issues for the power grid. The program encourages interdisciplinary efforts, with the involvement of experts in a variety of disciplines such as power system engineering, mathematics, statistics, and financial mathematics.

Research topics could include, but are not limited to: new statistical and uncertainty-analysis-based methods that provide probabilistic or robust performance guarantees accounting for uncertainty and fluctuations in loads, generation, and other components of the system; methods for characterizing and controlling resiliency and reliability; probabilistic approaches to manage risk and uncertainty, uncertainty quantification; model reduction; model validation; anomaly detection; data analytics; risk hedging; network theory; and computational methods that are scalable without sacrificing performance.

 

 

NSF et al: National Robotics Initiative 2.0: Ubiquitous Collaborative Robots (NRI-2.0) (NSF 18-518)

Due February 20, 2018; February 5, 2019; and the first Tuesday in February annually after that

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2018/nsf18518/nsf18518.htm

The National Science Foundation, USDA, U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Defense, DARPA, and Air Force Office of Research have significantly revised the solicitation for the National Robotics Initiative, now NSF 18-518 (replacing 17-518).

The NRI-2.0 program builds upon the original National Robotics Initiative (NRI) program to support fundamental research in the United States that will accelerate the development and use of collaborative robots (co-robots) that work beside or cooperatively with people. The focus of the NRI-2.0 program is on ubiquity, which in this context means seamless integration of co-robots to assist humans in every aspect of life.

The program supports four main research thrusts that are envisioned to advance the goal of ubiquitous co-robots: scalability, customizability, lowering barriers to entry, and societal impact. Topics addressing scalability include how robots can collaborate effectively with multiple humans or other robots; how robots can perceive, plan, act, and learn in uncertain, real-world environments, especially in a distributed fashion; and how to facilitate large-scale, safe, robust and reliable operation of robots in complex environments. Customizability includes how to enable co-robots to adapt to specific tasks, environments, or people, with minimal modification to hardware and software; how robots can personalize their interactions with people; and how robots can communicate naturally with humans, both verbally and non-verbally. Topics in lowering barriers to entry include development of open-source co-robot hardware and software, as well as widely-accessible testbeds. Topics in societal impact include fundamental research to establish and infuse robotics into educational curricula, advance the robotics workforce through education pathways, and explore the social, economic, ethical, and legal implications of our future with ubiquitous collaborative robots.

The sponsors expect to make 40-60 awards. Foundational projects will range from $250,000 to $750,000 in total costs for up to three years. Integrative projects will range from $500,000 to $1,500,000 in total costs for up to four years.

Collaborations with industry are encouraged.

An investigator may participate in no more than two proposals.

 

 

NSF Algorithms for Threat Detection (17-510)

Due February 21, 2017, and third Tuesday in February annually after that

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17510/nsf17510.htm

This program (an update of NSF 12-502) is led by the NSF Directorate for Mathematical & Physical Sciences (not computing), and it is a joint effort with the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. The focus is now on analysis of large geospatial datasets.

The recent growth of publicly available geospatial data sources now opens the possibility to document and understand the complicated dynamics of communities and identify patterns that may be indicative of threats. The ability to analyze such data in near real-time offers the potential to identify threat indicators quickly enough to prevent violent acts or limit their impact.

The Algorithms for Threat Detection program supports research on new ways to use spatiotemporal datasets to develop quantitative models of human dynamics. The objectives include improved representation of complicated group dynamics and the development of algorithms that can process data in near real-time to accurately identify unusual events and forecast future threats indicated by those events.

NSF expects to make 10-20 awards annually from a $3 million pool.

 

 

NSF: Professional Formation of Engineers (NSF 17-514)

Due February 23, 2017, and last Thursday of February after that

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17514/nsf17514.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

This program will make an estimated 15 awards from a $3 million pool to support research that considers the construction of engineering knowledge, engineering identity, and the engineering profession, as well as interventions that expand the boundaries of each of these. The objective of the PFE program is to create and support an innovative and inclusive engineering profession for the 21st Century.

The emphasis is on initiating research projects in professional formation of engineers rather than supporting research on any specific topic. Proposals from senior faculty who want to branch out into a deeper understanding of engineering education are encouraged. Projects should combine engineering approaches with those from learning and cognitive sciences, engineering education, social sciences, and related fields in synergistic ways and enable engineering faculty to develop expertise in engineering education research. The PI or at least one co-PI should have little or no experience conducting social science research.

This summary seems kind of squishy, but it comes into better focus if you read the whole solicitation.

 

 

NSF: Cyberinfrastructure for Emerging Science and Engineering Research  (CESER) (PD 17-7684)

Proposals accepted anytime

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505385

The overall goal of the Cyberinfrastructure for Emerging Science and Engineering Research (CESER) program is to foster the development of innovative cyberinfrastructure (CI) technologies and new means of leveraging existing CI resources to catalyze emerging areas of potentially transformative science and engineering research, including NSF priority areas, national strategic initiatives, and international collaborative research.

The CESER Program replaces the Strategic Technologies for Cyberinfrastructure (STCI) program. STCI's focus on supporting opportunities to advance technology across the CI ecosystem is incorporated into CESER with a new emphasis on enabling emerging science and engineering research areas.

A key programmatic objective of CESER is to support early-stage efforts by collaborative teams of domain scientists and cyberinfrastructure developers/implementers to identify and address cyberinfrastructure needs in new research areas through the development and deployment of pilot, experimental, and innovative hardware or software systems or other unique cyberinfrastructure activities that enable new pathways to discovery.

Another program objective is to encourage holistic, systematic, and multidisciplinary CI approaches to address new opportunities to enable science and engineering research. Projects that integrate multiple cyberinfrastructure disciplines – such as computing, data infrastructure, software, workflow systems, and networking - to address an emerging scientific challenge are particularly welcomed. CESER will also support projects that aim to expand the spectrum of research disciplines that, and users who, engage and contribute to a dynamic and enduring national research cyberinfrastructure ecosystem.

 

 

Army Corps of Engineers Engineer R&D Center Broad Agency Announcement

(W912HZ-17-BAA-01)

Open indefinitely

http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=291690

The Army invite proposals under literally dozens of topics in these laboratories and programs:

Conference & Symposia Grants

Coastal & Hydraulics Laboratory

Geotechnical & Structures Laboratory

Environmental Laboratory

Information Technology Laboratory

Construction Engineering Research Laboratory

Cold Regions Research & Engineering Laboratory

Geospatial Research Laboratory

 

 

March

 

 

NIH: Environmental Health Sciences Core Centers (EHS CC) (P30) (RFA-ES-17-003): NOTE: LIMIT ONE APPLICATION PER INSTITUTION

Letter of intent due April 17, 2017, March 17, 2018, March 17, 2019. Full proposal May 17, 2017, April 17, 2018, April 17, 2019.

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-ES-17-003.html

As intellectual hubs for environmental health research, the EHS CC is expected to be the thought leaders for the field and advance the goals of the NIEHS Strategic Plan (http://www.niehs.nih.gov/about/strategicplan/). The Core Centers provide critical research infrastructure, shared facilities, services and /or resources, to groups of investigators conducting environmental health sciences research.  An EHS CC enables researchers to conduct their independently-funded individual and/or collaborative research projects more efficiently and/or more effectively. The broad overall goal of an EHS CC is to identify and capitalize on emerging issues that advance improving the understanding of the relationships among environmental exposures, human biology, and disease.  The EHS CC supports community engagement and translational research as key approaches to improving public health. 

 

 

April

 

 

NSF: Biological and Environmental Interactions of Nanoscale Materials (PD 18-1179)

Proposals accepted anytime

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505424

This is part of the Environmental Engineering and Sustainability cluster in CBET, which includes Environmental Engineering and Environmental Sustainability. The goal of the Biological and Environmental Interactions of Nanoscale Materials program is to support research to advance fundamental and quantitative understanding of the interactions of biological and environmental media with nanomaterials and nanosystems. Materials of interest include one- to three-dimensional nanostructures, heterogeneous nano-bio hybrid assemblies, and other nanoparticles. Such nanomaterials and systems frequently exhibit novel physical, chemical, and biological behavior in living systems and environmental matrices as compared to the bulk scale. This program supports research that explores the interaction of nanomaterials in biological and environmental media.

Research areas supported by the program include:

-- Characterization of interactions at the interfaces between nanomaterials and nanosystems with surrounding biological and environmental media, including both simple nanoparticles and complex and/or heterogeneous composites;

-- Development of predictive tools based on the fundamental behavior of nanostructures within biological and ecological matrices to advance cost-effective and environmentally benign processing and engineering solutions over full life material cycles;

-- Examining the transport, interaction, and impact of nanostructured materials and nanosystems on biological systems;

-- Simulations of nanoparticle behavior at interfaces, in conjunction with experimental comparisons, and new theories and simulation approaches for determining the transport and transformation of nanoparticles in various media.

 

 

 

May