Bourns College of Engineering

Research Funding Opportunities

Revised September 11, 2017

 

NOTICE: CONDITIONS OF USE

The information on this page is for the use of the faculty, staff, and students of the University of California, Riverside, Bourns College of Engineering. It is compiled from information that we believe to be reliable, but the University takes no responsibility for any errors or inaccuracies.

 

 

 

Opportunity details (sorted by due date, sort of):

 

 

 

 

 

September

 

 

NSF/USDA: Plant Biotic Interactions (NSF 17-551)

Due September 1, 2017

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17551/nsf17551.htm

The National Science Foundation and the USDA National Institute of food and Agriculture have jointly released NSF Program Solicitation 17-551, Plant Biotic Interactions. This program will make approximately $14 million in new awards at $50,000 to $300,000 per year for 2-4 years.

The Plant Biotic Interactions (PBI) program supports basic research projects aimed at improved understanding of the interactions between plants, microbes and invertebrates, and applied research projects that translate new knowledge into novel methods of sustainably increasing crop yields. The connection between basic and applied research is a central theme of the PBI program. The last three decades have seen enormous growth in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that mediate the interaction of plants with their symbionts, pests and pathogens. As a result, a sophisticated and fertile conceptual framework now guides research in this field. Deepening mechanistic understanding, combined with rapidly expanding technical capacity to apply what has been learned to crop plants, points to the need to facilitate synergies between basic and applied research in the effort to improve agricultural practice. The PBI program supports basic and translational research as well as projects across this continuum. Previous organizational structures and priorities at NSF/BIO and USDA/NIFA impeded fluid development of practical applications of fundamental knowledge and insights. PBI was created to establish a programmatic environment that encourages intensive pursuit of fundamental understanding while also supporting the translation of the results of basic research to agricultural practice.

An individual may be a key person on no more than two proposals per year.

 

 

NSF Biomechanics and Mechanobiology (BMMB)

Due February 16, 2016, and February 15 annually after that; and September 1, 2016, and September 15 annually after that

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=13523

The BMMB Program supports fundamental research in biomechanics and mechanobiology. An emphasis is placed on multiscale mechanics approaches in the study of organisms that integrate across molecular, cell, tissue, and organ domains. The influence of in vivo mechanical forces on cell and matrix biology in the histomorphogenesis, maintenance, regeneration, and aging of tissues is an important concern. In addition, the relationships between mechanical behavior and extracellular matrix composition and organization are of interest. Funded projects may include theoretical, computational, and experimental approaches. The program encourages the consideration of diverse living tissues as smart materials that are self-designing.

 

 

NIH Director’s Pioneer Award (DP1) (RFA-RM-17-005)

Due September 1, 2017

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-17-005.html

The NIH Director’s Pioneer Award complements NIH's traditional, investigator-initiated grant programs by supporting individual scientists of exceptional creativity who propose pioneering and possibly transforming approaches to addressing major biomedical or behavioral challenges that have the potential to produce an unusually high impact on enhancing health, lengthening life, and reducing illness and disability. To be considered pioneering, the proposed research must reflect substantially different scientific directions from those already being pursued in the investigator’s research program or elsewhere.

The NIH Director's Pioneer Award is part of the High-Risk, High-Reward Research program, which also includes the NIH Director's New Innovator Award, the NIH Director's Transformative Research Award, and the NIH Director's Early Independence Award. The program is part of the NIH Common Fund, which supports cross-cutting programs that are expected to have exceptionally high impact. All Common Fund initiatives invite investigators to develop bold, innovative, and often risky approaches to address significant problems with no clear solution or to seize new opportunities that offer the potential for rapid progress.

To be considered pioneering, the proposed research must reflect ideas substantially different from those being pursued in the investigator’s research program or being pursued elsewhere. The Pioneer Award is not intended to expand a current research program's funding in the area of the proposed project. While the research direction may have as its foundation the applicant’s prior work and expertise, it cannot be an obvious extension or scale up of a current research enterprise which could be anticipated to be competitive as a new or renewal R01 application. Rather, the proposed project must reflect a fundamental new insight into the potential solution of a problem, which may derive from the development of exceptionally innovative approaches and/or from the posing of radically unconventional hypotheses. Applications for projects that are extensions of ongoing research should not be submitted.

Pioneer awardees are required to commit the major portion (at least 51%) of their research effort to activities supported by the Pioneer Award research project in the first three years of the project period. Effort expended toward teaching, administrative, or clinical duties should not be included in this calculation. Awardees will be allowed to reduce effort to 33% and 25% in the fourth and fifth years, respectively, to help them transition to other sources of support since Pioneer Awards cannot be renewed. Applicants with current research commitments exceeding 49% must provide a detailed explanation describing how their effort on existing grants will be adjusted to permit them to devote the required minimum effort to the Pioneer Award project. Applicants who will not be able to meet this requirement should not submit applications.

Awards are $700,000 of direct costs per year for five years.

 

 

NIH: Assay development and screening for discovery of chemical probes or therapeutic agents (R01) (PAR-17-438)

Letters of intent due 30 days before proposal due date. Proposals due February 5, June 5, October 5 annually to September 2020

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-17-438.html

This program will support three stages of discovery research – assay development, primary screen implementation, and hit validation – with the aim of making the following improvements:

-- First, increased rigor in target identification is necessary. For instance, whether prior studies of the selected target were adequately controlled and powered are important considerations. Were cell lines verified, plasmids sequenced, and protein reagents tested for contaminants?

-- Second, reproducibility of the proposed primary assay should be carefully considered because this assay is often the basis for assessing not only initial hits, but also for iteratively assessing optimized hits during structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies. Development of primary screening assays that test a key biological function of the target of interest are likely to yield hits of increased relevance. In this respect, phenotypic screens have had a resurgence.

-- Third, a hit validation scheme or “critical path” that includes orthogonal assay(s) to eliminate false positives, as well as a series of assays in diverse biological systems with diverse read-outs, particularly including assays that model human disease, is likely to yield hits of increased relevance.

-- Fourth, inclusion of skilled synthetic and/or medicinal chemists to assess the validity of the hit chemotypes to eliminate PAINS (pan-assay interference compounds) or other undesirable chemotypes.

-- A final area for improvement is the optimization of hits to yield high quality probes. Technological innovations in high throughput screening, chemical synthesis, and cheminformatics have allowed rapid discovery of novel, small-molecule probes for the study of disease related biological processes and mechanisms in academic environments (see Academic Screening Facilities Directory; Academic Drug Discovery Consortium). The Chemical Probes Portal, established in July 2015, provides a list of credentialed probes. It is noted that probes may be the predecessors of drugs, but drugs with known off-target effects are seldom useful as probes of specific biological activities. Importantly, identification of chemical probe(s) for a given target provides an unprecedented opportunity for investigators to translate knowledge about diseases into tangible tools for translational research and opens the door to validation of the target prior to clinical testing.

The agencies sponsoring this program – NCI, NIAID, NIDA, and NIDCD – have specific areas of interest. Please review those closely before starting on a proposal.

 

 

NSF: Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) (17-565)

Due September 5, 2017, and August 8, 2018

https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf17565

This is revised from previous years. The program supports research on the design, development, implementation, and selective spread of innovative strategies for engaging students in technology-rich experiences that: (1) increase student awareness of STEM occupations; (2) motivate students to pursue appropriate education pathways to STEM occupations; or (3) develop disciplinary-based knowledge and practices, or promote critical thinking, reasoning skills, or communication skills needed for entering STEM workforce sectors.

There are three classes of awards:

Exploratory Projects: ITEST Exploratory projects advance theory and generate evidence to inform the design and development of strategies for achieving desired learning outcomes. Exploratory projects may examine factors associated with new innovations, or they may examine modifications of existing practices to promote outcomes associated with advancing STEM workforce objectives. In either case, the research should focus on elucidating the associations among learning experiences or environments and desired learning outcomes, identifying malleable factors that influence outcomes, or identifying factors or conditions that moderate learning outcomes.

Exploratory projects can be up to two years in duration with a maximum award size of $400,000. The size and duration of the request should be appropriate to the scope of the project.

Strategies Projects: The goal of ITEST Strategies projects is to design, implement, and study innovative interventions that support PreK-12 student engagement in relevant learning experiences that: (1) incorporate the skills, knowledge, and practices associated with STEM occupations; and (2) generate student awareness of, interests in, or capacities to participate in STEM occupations or education pathways leading to those occupations. Strategies projects may also devise ways to provide teachers with the appropriate resources to ensure students consider and are prepared for entering the STEM workforce. Strategies projects are expected to contribute to STEM education knowledge about the design and implementation of effective interventions as well as about future research activities.

Strategies proposals are expected to draw on existing theory and evidence to design and iteratively develop interventions or strategies, including testing of individual components to provide feedback in the development process. Strategies projects can include pilot tests of fully developed interventions to determine whether they achieve intended outcomes under varying contexts and conditions. Results should reveal understandings about how and which aspects of the project are effective in motivating and engaging students in STEM learning, career awareness, or persistence in STEM endeavors.

Strategies projects can be up to three years in duration with a maximum award size of $1,200,000. The size and duration of the request should be appropriate to the scope of the project.

Successful Project Expansion and Dissemination (SPrEaD) Projects: The goal of ITEST SPrEaD projects is to support the further development of successful innovative interventions across a wider range of contexts and settings. To this end, ITEST accepts proposals for developed interventions having evidence of strong theoretical and empirical support that can be expanded in order to determine whether they achieve intended outcomes under varying contexts and conditions. Where appropriate, SPrEaD projects document factors that may enhance, moderate, or constrain the effects of strategies designed to promote student knowledge of, or dispositions toward, STEM education programs and occupations. Programmatically, the ITEST program accumulates information from SPrEaD projects to inform the larger ITEST community's efforts to build and inform future implementation research and impact studies.

 

 

NIH Director's New Innovator Award Program (DP2) (RFA-RM-17-006)

Due September 8, 2017

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-17-006.html

The NIH Director’s New Innovator Award (DP2) supports a small number of early stage investigators of exceptional creativity who propose bold and highly innovative new research approaches that have the potential to produce a major impact on broad, important problems in biomedical and behavioral research. The NIH Director's New Innovator Award complements ongoing efforts by NIH and its Institutes and Centers to fund early stage investigators through R01 grants.

An early stage investigator has not competed successfully for a significant NIH independent research award and is within 10 years of completing his/her terminal research degree or is within 10 years of completing medical residency (or the equivalent).

New investigators may have exceptionally innovative research ideas, but not the preliminary data required to fare well in the traditional NIH peer review system. As part of NIH's commitment to increasing opportunities for new scientists, it has created the NIH Director's New Innovator Award to support exceptionally creative new investigators who propose highly innovative research projects that have the potential for unusually high impact. This award complements ongoing efforts by NIH and its Institutes and Centers to fund new investigators through R01 grants and other mechanisms.

The NIH Director's New Innovator Award is different from traditional NIH grants in several ways. It is designed specifically to support unusually creative investigators with highly innovative research ideas at an early stage of their career when they may lack the preliminary data required for an R01 grant application. The emphasis is on innovation and creativity; preliminary data are not required, but may be included. No detailed, annual budget is requested in the application. The review process emphasizes the individual’s creativity, the innovativeness of the research approaches, and the potential of the project, if successful, to have a significant impact on an important biomedical or behavioral research problem.

The research proposed for a NIH Director's New Innovator Award may be in any scientific area relevant to the mission of NIH (biological, behavioral, clinical, social, physical, chemical, computational, engineering, and mathematical sciences). Investigators who were not selected for an award in prior years may submit applications this year as long as they retain their ESI (early stage investigator) eligibility; however, all applications must be submitted as “new” applications regardless of any previous submission to the program.

Awards will be up to $1.5 million of direct costs ($300,000 per year over five years).

 

 

NSF: Science of Science and Innovation Policy (PD 9-7626)

Due February 9 and September 9 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=501084&org=NSF&sel_org=NSF&from=fund

The Science of Science & Innovation Policy (SciSIP) program supports research designed to advance the scientific basis of science and innovation policy.  The program funds research to develop models, analytical tools, data and metrics that can be applied in the science policy decision making process and concern the use and allocation of scarce scientific resources.

 

 

DARPA: Imaging Through Almost Anything, Anywhere (ITA3) (DARPA-SN-17-72)

Due September 11, 2017

https://www.fbo.gov/spg/ODA/DARPA/CMO/DARPA-SN-17-72/listing.html

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has released DARPA-SN-17-72, Imaging Through Almost Anything, Anywhere (ITA3). This program will make 18-month awards for innovative basic or applied research concepts that explore physical systems and/or math and computational systems through the lens of fundamental limits and new foundations. The research will determine the 3D resolution/range trade space based on the use of all pervasive low-frequency, electromagnetic waves, combined with simple computational methods to consider the general problem of imaging through metal containers, walls, ground, fog, water, and other complex media.

 

 

DARPA: Fundamentals of Design (DARPA-SN-17-71)

Due September 11, 2017

https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=9f259077111153bce4737d92f86ec95e&tab=core&_cview=1

This program will support 18-month efforts to discover new approaches to designing complex systems. The goal of the Fundamental Design (FUN DESIGN) program is to investigate new fundamental computational and mathematical building blocks to represent conceptual designs of mechanical systems and enable the generation of novel configurations through the exploration of various combinations of these design building blocks. The ability to mathematically represent the preliminary components of a design as a formula enables the designer to discover new and improved species of designs by changing the build formulas, for example, through perturbation, combining best of breed formulas, and by elimination. One of the fundamental insights of the FUN DESIGN program is that locking down specific geometry early in the design process is unnecessarily restrictive and hinders adaptability as design requirements evolve. Another insight is that the shift from hand coding to deep learning techniques in other domains such as image recognition and language understanding may have analogs for design.

 

 

ARPA-E: Innovative Natural Gas Technologies for Efficiency Gain in Reliable and Affordable Thermochemical Electricity-Generation (INTEGRATE) (DE-FOA-0001797)

Concept papers due September 11, 2017

https://arpa-e-foa.energy.gov/Default.aspx#FoaIdd4eff7a0-891c-4b57-a25e-3b757cd972fd

The objective of the INTEGRATE Program is to reduce the cost and increase the primary energy efficiency associated with the provision of electric power to commercial and industrial end users. In this program, ARPA-E seeks to develop natural gas-fueled distributed electric generation systems that offer fuel to electric power conversion efficiencies in excess of 70%. The INTEGRATE program will focus on hybrid system designs that integrate a fuel cell with a heat or reactive engine for ultra-high efficiency at competitive costs. This FOA seeks to encourage the development of the enabling technologies that will make these hybrid systems a reality, and a successful INTEGRATE program will provide highly flexible distributed energy technology options with unprecedented efficiency and lower emissions than today's fossil-fuel generated electricity. Furthermore, the technologies that this program seeks to develop are also expected to have broad electric-power-generation and transportation market applications.

ARPA-E anticipates a two-phase program. Phase 1 will focus on the development of enabling component and sub-system technologies. Phase II will focus on the development and validation of the complete integrated system technology. A proposal can address phase I only, or both phases.

ARPA-E expects to make 5-15 awards from a $20 million pool. Awards will range from $250,000 to $4 million for phase I, and up to $12 million for phase I + II. Cost sharing of 20% of total project costs (1:4) is required, but this can be reduced to 10% or 5% depending on the composition of the team.

 

 

NSF Materials Engineering and Processing (PD 16-8092)

Due February 16, 2016, September 15, 2016, February 15 annually, September 15 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=504950

The Materials Engineering and Processing (MEP) program supports fundamental research addressing the processing and mechanical performance  of engineering materials by investigating the interrelationship of materials processing, structure, properties and/or life-cycle performance for targeted applications.

 

 

NSF: Mechanics of Materials (PD 17-1630)

Proposals are accepted September 1, 2017 - September 15, 2017 and September 1 - September 15, Annually Thereafter; and January 10, 2018 - January 24, 2018, and January 10 - January 24, Annually Thereafter.

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=13355

This program supports fundamental research in mechanics as related to the behavior of deformable solid materials and structures under internal and external actions. The program supports a diverse spectrum of research with emphasis on transformative advances in experimental, theoretical, and computational methods. Submitted proposals should clearly emphasize the contributions to the field of mechanics.

Proposals related to material response are welcome, including, but not limited to, advances in fundamental understanding of deformation, fracture, and fatigue as well as contact and friction. Proposals that relate to structural response are also welcome, including, but not limited to, advances in the understanding of nonlinear deformation, instability and collapse, and wave propagation. Proposals addressing mechanics at the intersection of materials and structures, such as, but not limited to, meta-materials, hierarchical, micro-architectured and low-dimensional materials are also encouraged.

Proposals that explore and build upon advanced computing techniques and tools to enable major advances in mechanics are particularly welcome. For example, proposals incorporating reduced-order modeling, data-driven techniques, and/or stochastic methods with a strong emphasis on validation are encouraged.  Also welcome are proposals addressing data analytics for deformation or damage response deduction from large experimental and computational data sets. Similarly, proposals that explore new experimental techniques to capture deformation and failure information for extreme ranges of loading or material behavior are also encouraged. Finally, experimental and computational methods that address information across multiple length and time scales, potentially involving multiphysics considerations are also welcome.

Proposals with a focus on buildings and civil infrastructure system are welcome in CMMI and should be submitted to the program on Structural and Architectural Engineering Materials (SAEM). Proposals addressing processing and mechanical performance enhancements should be submitted to the Materials Engineering and Processing (MEP) program. Investigators with proposals focused on design methodological approaches and theory enabling the accelerated development and insertion of materials should consider the Design of Engineering Material Systems (DEMS) program. Lastly, investigators with interest in developing a combined theoretical and experimental approach to accelerate materials discovery and development should direct their proposals to the Designing Materials to Revolutionize and Engineer Our Future (DMREF) opportunity.

Proposers are actively encouraged to email a one-page project summary to MOMS@nsf.gov before full proposal submission to determine if the research topic falls within the scope of the MOMS program.

 

 

Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Program (N00014-17-S-F014)

Due September 15, 2017

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=294449

To be eligible, you must be in your first or second tenure-track appointment, and you must have begun your first tenure-track appointment after December 31, 2012. You must be a U.S. citizen, national, or permanent resident. ONR is looking for creative proposals demonstrating the potential for making progress in an ONR research area. You will identify the research area you are targeting in the proposal.

Awards are up to $170,000 per year for three years. You are allowed to request funds for equipment in year 1 on top of that amount.

added 6/9/17mb

 

 

NSF: Dynamics, Control and Systems Diagnostics  (DCSD) (PD 15-7569)

Due September 15, 2015; February 16, 2016; and September 15 and February 16 annually after that.

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505182&WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

This program from the ENG Division of Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation supports fundamental research on the analysis, measurement, monitoring and control of dynamic systems, including development of new analytical, computational and experimental tools, and novel applications to engineered and natural systems. Dynamics is the science of systems that change in time. Control concerns the use of external influences to produce desired dynamic behaviors. Systems diagnostics concerns the use of observation to infer information about a dynamic system. Objectives of the DCSD program are the discovery of new phenomena and the investigation of innovative methods and applications in dynamics, control and diagnostics. The intellectual merit of proposals submitted to the DCSD program will be evaluated on the basis of fundamental innovation in foundational areas, on alignment with the core disciplines of the CMMI Division, and on potential for transformative impact within and across disciplinary boundaries.

Research topics of current interest include, but are not limited to, complex dynamical and structural systems; fundamental studies on stability, phase transitions, and wave propagation in complex and non-local media; integrity monitoring, reliability and safety of complex or stochastic engineered systems; unconventional applications of control; control and diagnostics of complex, distributed, interconnected and/or constrained systems; and control concepts inspired by nature.

 

 

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) Academic Research Program (HM0210-14-BAA-0001)

Open to September 2017

http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=254129

. NGA seeks proposals from eligible U.S. institutions for path-breaking GEOINT research in areas of potential interest to NGA, the DoD, and the Intelligence Community (IC). NGA welcomes any innovative research ideas, including, but not limited to, example areas such as:

-- Access to GEOINT data and services

-- Advancing Geolocation and data uncertainty

-- Anticipatory Analysis

-- Computer Vision

-- Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science supporting GEOINT

-- Exploiting data from new sources and sensors

-- GEOINT tradecraft

-- Geolinguistics

-- Graph methods for geospatial data

-- Image Science

-- Massive data

-- Predictive intelligence

-- Signature development & discovery

-- Spatio-temporal analysis

-- Strategic indications and warning

-- Understanding human activities

-- Video Indexing and Search

-- Video Content Extraction

-- Visual analytics for GEOINT

There are five types of awards:

1. NGA University Research Initiatives (NURI) awards. NURI awards focused on fundamental research in Geospatial Intelligence topics and are open to all eligible institutions. Awards typically are 24 months and $300,000, with up to three option years at up to $150,000 per year.

2. NGA Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions (HBCU/MI) research awards. The lead institution must be an HBCU or Minority Serving Institution. UCR qualifies for this designation as a Hispanic Serving Institution. NGA will consider proposals in this category for (1) research to improve GEOINT analysis, (2) educational research, (3) research to strengthen GEOINT academic programs, (4) curriculum development research, and (5) faculty development research. A proposal may include one or more of these areas, as well as any other topic specific to GEOINT program objectives and the NGA mission. These awards typically are $150,000 for two years, plus up to three one-year options at $75,000 per year.

3. NGA Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Research awards. A consortium of accredited institutions is encouraged to include a minimum of one HBCU/MI institution as a member. NGA will consider proposals in this category to (1) expand, upgrade, enrich, or integrate undergraduate and graduate course offerings in geospatial sciences; (2) conduct focused mentoring of undergraduate or graduate student research in geospatial related areas; (3) present geospatial science related workshops in the institution’s geographic area that includes, to the maximum extent practicable, other colleges/universities, community colleges, and/or high schools annually; (4) conduct research designed to increase innovation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics programs for students in grades K – 12; and (5) STEM-related faculty development research. Awards typically are 24 months and $300,000, with up to three option years at up to $150,000 per year.

4. NGA New Investigator Program Grants. These awards are open to faculty employed by eligible institutions who are U.S. citizens, U.S. nationals, or permanent U.S. residents who have held their doctorate degrees (PhD or equivalent) for less than five years at the time of application. These awards typically are for 24 months and $200,000, plus up to one one-year option at $100,000.

5. NGA Research Collaboration Forum (NRCF) Grants. These awards are intended to encourage collaboration forums in the United States for the systematic exploration and advancement of greater scientific breakthroughs or understanding in one or more GEOINT research issues. (Cost sharing is encouraged, but not required, for this category.) These awards typically are less than $30,000 per event.

A brief white paper (4 pp) is required. NGA will invite or not invite a full proposal. White papers will be accepted until August 31, 2017.

 

NSF Geography and Spatial Sciences Program (14-537)

Proposals due first Thursday of September annually

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2014/nsf14537/nsf14537.htm

The goals of the NSF Geography and Spatial Sciences (GSS) Program are

•To promote scientific research in geography and the spatial sciences that advances theory and basic understanding and that addresses the challenges facing society.

•To promote the integration of geographers and spatial scientists in interdisciplinary research.

•To promote education and training of geographers and spatial scientists in order to enhance the capabilities of current and future generations of researchers.

•To promote the development and use of scientific methods and tools for geographic research.

 

 

NSF: Dynamics, Control and Systems Diagnostics  (DCSD) (PD 17-7569)

Due January 13, 2017; September 15, 2017; and September 15 annually after that.

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505182

This program will support fundamental research on the analysis, measurement, monitoring and control of dynamic systems. The program promotes innovation in the following areas:

•Modeling: creation of new mathematical frameworks to apply tools of dynamics to physical systems

•Analysis: discovery and exploration of structure in dynamic behavior

•Diagnostics: dynamic methods that infer system properties from observations

•Control: methods that produce desired dynamic behavior

Proposals submitted to the DCSD program should clearly identify, articulate and motivate innovative components in one or more of the foundational areas above.

Furthermore, proposals should be aligned with the disciplinary thrusts of the CMMI division. To ensure that a project is appropriate for the DCSD program, PIs are very strongly encouraged to contact DCSD Program Directors prior to the full submission.

 

 

NSF: Manufacturing Machines and Equipment  (MME) (PD-17-1468)

Due January 13, 2017; September 15, 2017; and September 15 annually after that

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=13346

MME supports fundamental research that enables the development of new and/or improved manufacturing machines and equipment, and optimization of their use, with a particular focus on equipment appropriate for the manufacture of mechanical and electromechanical devices, products, and systems featuring scales from microns to meters (proposals relating to nanomanufacturing should be submitted to the CMMI NanoManufacturing program, and those relating to the manufacture of electronic devices such as IC products should be submitted to the ECCS Division). Proposals relating to a wide range of manufacturing operations are encouraged, including both subtractive and additive processes, forming, bonding/joining, and laser processing.  Proposals that will enable innovations in one or more of the Manufacturing USA institutes' focus areas (https://www.manufacturing.gov/nnmi-institutes/) and leverage the facilities, infrastructure and member companies of an institute, are also encouraged.

Competitive projects will propose hypothesis-driven research that advances the frontiers of knowledge in relevant areas. Proposals submitted to the MME program should include a clearly articulated research (not developmental) objective and a coherent plan to accomplish the stated objective. Both experimental and theoretical work are supported. The Project Description must contain, as a separate section within the narrative, a section labeled "Broader Impacts."

 

 

NSF Nanomanufacturing (PD 17-1788)

Due January 13, 2017; September 15, 2017; and September 15 annually after that.

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=13347

This program supports basic research in nanostructure and process design principles, integration across length-scales, and system-level integration. The program leverages advances in the understanding of nano-scale phenomena and processes (physical, chemical, electrical, thermal, mechanical and biological), nanomaterials discovery, novel nanostructure architectures, and new nanodevice and nanosystem concepts. It seeks to address quality, efficiency, scalability, reliability, safety and affordability issues that are relevant to manufacturing. To address these issues, the Program encourages research on processes and production systems based on computation, modeling and simulation, use of process metrology, sensing, monitoring, and control, and assessment of product (nanomaterial, nanostructure, nanodevice or nanosystem) quality and performance.

The program seeks to explore transformative approaches to nanomanufacturing, including but not limited to: micro-reactor and micro-fluidics enabled nanosynthesis, bio-inspired nanomanufacturing, manufacturing by nanomachines, additive nanomanufacturing, hierarchical nanostructure assembly, continuous high-rate nanofabrication such as roll-to-roll processing or massively-parallel large-area processing, and modular manufacturing platforms for nanosystems. The Program encourages the fabrication of nanomaterials by design, three-dimensional nanostructures, multi-layer nanodevices, and multi-material and multi-functional nanosystems. Also of interest is the manufacture of dynamic nanosystems such as nanomotors, nanorobots, and nanomachines, and enabling advances in transport and diffusion mechanisms at the nano-scale.

The program supports education of the next generation of researchers, and encourages building a workforce trained in nanomanufacturing systems. It is also interested in understanding long-term environmental, health and societal (EHS) implications of large-scale production and use of nano-scale materials, devices and systems.

 

 

Joint NSF/NIH Initiative on Quantitative Approaches to Biomedical Big Data (QuBBD) (NSF 16-573)

Due September 17, 2016; September 12, 2017

https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?WT.z_pims_id=505292&ods_key=nsf16573

This program will make 10-20 awards from a $5 million pool. Projects are expected to be $200,000 to $300,000 (total) per year for three years. The program will support novel mathematical, statistical, or computational approaches to biomedical big data challenges. Collaborative efforts that bring together quantitative scientists and biomedical researchers are a requirement for this program and must be convincingly demonstrated in the proposal. The program is designed to foster and support new inter- and multi-disciplinary teams of investigators. A "new team" is defined as a team where none of the biomedical scientists have previously collaborated with any of the quantitative scientists. Evidence of prior collaboration includes but is not limited to having joint publications or being listed as key personnel on the same grant. Research teams with pre-existing collaborations should instead submit directly to other NSF and/or NIH funding opportunities. Proposals from teams of junior investigators are encouraged.

Successful projects will involve the development of novel mathematical, statistical, or computational models and methodology to solve important biomedical big data problems. Research that involves the application of standard mathematical, statistical, or computational tools to solve important biomedical big data problems is not appropriate for this competition and should be submitted directly to NIH. Similarly, proposals that focus on research in mathematics or statistics that is not tied to a specific biomedical big data problem should be submitted to the appropriate DMS program at NSF.

Proposals will adhere mostly to NSF formatting and content requirements.

 

 

NSF/NEH: Documenting Endangered Languages: data, infrastructure, and computational methods (NSF 15-567)

Due September 15 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15567/nsf15567.htm

This funding partnership between the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) supports projects to develop and advance knowledge concerning endangered human languages. Made urgent by the imminent death of roughly half of the approximately 7000 currently used languages, this effort aims to exploit advances in information technology to build computational infrastructure for endangered language research. The program supports projects that contribute to data management and archiving, and to the development of the next generation of researchers. Funding can support fieldwork and other activities relevant to the digital recording, documenting, and archiving of endangered languages, including the preparation of lexicons, grammars, text samples, and databases. Funding will be available in the form of one- to three-year senior research grants as well as fellowships from six to twelve months and doctoral dissertation research improvement grants for up to 24 months.

 

 

NIH Director’s Transformative Research Awards (R01) (RFA-RM-17-007)

Due September 15, 2017

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-17-007.html

The goal of the NIH Director's Transformative Research Award is to provide support for collaborative investigative teams or individual scientists who propose unusually innovative research projects, which, if successful, would have a major impact in a broad area of biomedical or behavioral research. To be considered transformative, projects must have the potential to create or overturn fundamental scientific paradigms through the use of novel approaches, to transform the way research is conducted through the development of novel tools or technologies, or to lead to major improvements in health through the development of highly innovative therapies, diagnostic tools, or preventive strategies. Consistent with this focus, applications supported under the Transformative Research Award will reflect ideas substantially different from mainstream concepts.

Several key features of this FOA have been designed to emphasize to applicants and peer reviewers that these applications are very different from conventional, investigator-initiated research awards. The application format, through its requirements for explicitly addressing specific issues, focuses attention on the importance of the problem, the novelty of the hypothesis and/or the proposed methodology, and the magnitude of the potential impact rather than on preliminary data or experimental details. Reviewers will be instructed to emphasize significance and innovation in their evaluations, and these criteria will be the primary basis for funding decisions. These features are intended to steer applicants and reviewers, at each step of the process, toward the goal of this initiative, which is to solicit and fund unusually bold and potentially transformative research.  

NIH expects to make seven awards from an $8 million pool.

 

 

BRAIN Initiative: New Technologies and Novel Approaches for Large-Scale Recording and Modulation in the Nervous System (U01) (RFA-NS-17-003)

Letters of intent due November 21, 2016, and September 18, 2017. Proposals due December 21, 2016, and October 18, 2017

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-17-003.html

Understanding the dynamic activity of neural circuits is central to the NIH BRAIN Initiative.  This FOA seeks applications for proof-of-concept testing and development of new technologies and novel approaches for largescale recording and manipulation of neural activity to enable transformative understanding of dynamic signaling in the nervous system.  In particular, we seek exceptionally creative approaches to address major challenges associated with recording and manipulating neural activity, at or near cellular resolution, at multiple spatial and/or temporal scales, in any region and throughout the entire depth of the brain.  It is expected that the proposed research may be high-risk, but if successful could profoundly change the course of neuroscience research.  

Proposed technologies should be compatible with experiments in behaving animals, and should include advancements that enable or reduce major barriers to hypothesis-driven experiments.  Technologies may engage diverse types of signaling beyond neuronal electrical activity for large-scale analysis, and may utilize any modality such as optical, electrical, magnetic, acoustic or genetic recording/manipulation.  Applications that seek to integrate multiple approaches are encouraged.  Where appropriate, applications are expected to integrate appropriate domains of expertise, including biological, chemical and physical sciences, engineering, computational modeling and statistical analysis. 

 

NSF/NIH: Joint DMS/NIGMS Initiative to Support Research at the Interface of the Biological and Mathematical Sciences (DMS/NIGMS) (NSF 17-569)

Due September 18, 2017, and September 18 annually after that

https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf17569

The National Science Foundation (Math & Physical Sciences) and the National Institutes of Health (Institute of General Medical Sciences) have jointly released NSF 17-569, Joint DMS/NIGMS Initiative to Support Research at the Interface of the Biological and Mathematical Sciences (DMS/NIGMS). This program will make an estimated 20 awards of up to $400,000 each (total) to promote research at the interface of the biological and mathematical sciences. The expertise of DMS in the mathematical and statistical sciences and the complementary expertise of NIGMS in biological and biomedical research are expected to provide support for novel, transformative quantitative biological research.

Successful proposals will either involve the formulation of new mathematical, computational, or statistical models and tools whose analysis poses significant mathematical challenges or identify innovative mathematics or statistics needed to solve an important biological problem. Research that would apply standard mathematical or statistical techniques to solve biological problems is not appropriate for this competition and should be submitted directly to NIH. Similarly, proposals with research in mathematics or statistics that is not tied to a specific biological problem should be submitted to the appropriate DMS program at NSF. Proposals designed to create new software tools based on existing models and methods will not be accepted in this competition.

 

 

NSF: Software Infrastructure for Sustained Innovation (17-526)

SSE proposals due March 7, 2017

S2I2 Conceptualization Proposals due April 11, 2017

SSI proposals due September 19, 2017

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17526/nsf17526.htm

The National Science Foundation has updated its S2I2 program, now Program Solicitation 17-526. This program is part of the Cyberinfrastructure Framework for 21st Century Science and Engineering (CIF21), which envisions a highly reusable and interoperable cyberinfrastructure architecture that integrates large-scale computing, high-speed networks, massive data archives, instruments and major facilities, observatories, experiments, and embedded sensors and actuators, across the nation and the world, to help make great strides towards revolutionizing virtually every science and engineering discipline.

SI2 includes three classes of awards:

1. Scientific Software Elements (SSE, up to $500,000 over 3 years): SSE awards target small groups that will create and deploy robust software elements for which there is a demonstrated need that will advance one or more significant areas of science and engineering.

2. Scientific Software Integration (SSI, $200,000 to $1 million over 3-5 years): SSI awards target larger, interdisciplinary teams organized around the development and application of common software infrastructure aimed at solving common research problems faced by NSF researchers in one or more areas of science and engineering. SSI awards will result in a sustainable community software framework serving a diverse community or communities.

3.Scientific Software Innovation Institutes (S2I2, up to $500,000): S2I2 awards are intended to establish long-term hubs of excellence in software infrastructure and technologies, which will serve a research community of substantial size and disciplinary breadth. S2I2 includes two subclasses of awards: Conceptualization Awards, which are planning awards aimed at organizing an interdisciplinary community and understanding their software requirements and challenges; and Implementation Awards, which will be made to implement community activities that support software infrastructure, for example, such as those developed by the conceptualization awards. Only Conceptualization proposals will be accepted for this solicitation cycle. However, successful Conceptualization proposals must reflect the quality, commitment, and planning that will be needed to lead to full Implementation awards. Conceptualization proposals submitted to NSF in response to this solicitation must exhibit clear relevance to the overall SI2 program and should be responsive to this solicitation and its review criteria. Proposals that are not relevant or not responsive to the solicitation will not be considered for funding and will be returned without review. Conceptualization proposals must also be in areas not covered by current Conceptualization and Implementation awards. For a list of awards, see Implementation of NSF Software Vision (https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=504817).

An individual may be PI, Co-PI, or Other Senior Person on no more than one proposal per year.

Last updated 03/13/17 SS

 

 

NIH: Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Community-Based Data and Metadata Standards Efforts (R24) (RFA-ES-16-010)

Letters of intent are due October 9, 2016, and September 19, 2017. Proposals are due November 9, 2016; October 19, 2017.

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-ES-16-010.html

This program will make five awards in 2017 and five additional awards in 2018 for projects aimed at establishing data standards within biomedical research communities. The purpose of this program is to support activities necessary to develop or extend/refine data and metadata standards and/or related tools in areas relevant to the NIH basic, translational, and clinical research missions to support. Based on results from a workshop on the topic, areas of interest include the following:

1) Initiation, establishment of stakeholders/working group(s), establishment and refinement of technical requirements/use cases;

2) Harmonization or mapping of standards for use by a community or to bridge use by multiple communities;

3) Technical development, extension, and/or adaptation of the standard(s), including any tools to implement and/or facilitate use of the standard – for example, adaptation or use of BD2K-supported CEDAR (Center for Data Annotation and Retrieval) tools to facilitate creating or harmonizing metadata standards in a new research domain;

4) Validation and 'fit for purpose' testing of the standard; iterative refinement of the standard based on end-user feedback; comparison of performance against other relevant standards;

5) Development of appropriate metrics and an overall evaluation plan to assess the impact of the data standard;

6) Development and implementation of dissemination strategies to maximize awareness, accessibility and uptake of the standard and associated tools;

7) Engagement with appropriate partners to develop a long-term plan for maintaining and sustaining the standard.

All standards must become registered in the NIH’s FAIR system.

Awards will be up to $250,000 per year (direct costs) for up to two years.

 

 

DOD: Reconstructive Transplant Research Program Technology Development Award (W81XWH-17-RTRP-TDA)

Pre-applications are due September 20. Full proposals will be invited around October 12 and will be due December 6. Projects will begin in spring of 2018.

http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=296356 (then click on the Related Documents tab)

This program will support research that will foster new directions for, and address neglected issues in, the field of reconstructive transplantation, specifically vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA)-focused research, also known as composite tissue allotransplantation. VCA refers to the transplantation of multiple tissues such as muscle, bone, nerve, and skin, and as a functional unit (e.g., a hand or face) from a deceased donor to a recipient with a severe injury.

A proposal must address at least one of these focus areas:

1. Development of ex vivo VCA tissue preservation strategies to extend the time between procurement and transplantation, with a goal of 24 hours

--Novel perfusates and suspended metabolism are encouraged

--Strategies beyond incremental improvements in pump technologies are encouraged

2. Graft clinical monitoring – acute and chronic, as applied to VCA

--Development of non-invasive advanced imaging technologies

--Development of biomarker profiles and methods for early reliable detection of graft rejection

Awards can be up to $1 million.

 

 

NSF EHR Core Research: Fundamental Research in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Education (15-509)

Due second Thursday in September annually

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15509/nsf15509.htm

The EHR Core Research (ECR) program of fundamental research in STEM education provides funding in critical research areas that are essential, broad and enduring. EHR seeks proposals that will help synthesize, build and/or expand research foundations in the following focal areas: STEM learning, STEM learning environments, STEM workforce development, and broadening participation in STEM.

The ECR program is distinguished by its emphasis on the accumulation of robust evidence to inform efforts to (a) understand, (b) build theory to explain, and (c) suggest interventions (and innovations) to address persistent challenges in STEM interest, education, learning, and participation. The program supports advances in fundamental research on STEM learning and education by fostering efforts to develop foundational knowledge in STEM learning and learning contexts, both formal and informal, from childhood through adulthood, for all groups, and from the earliest developmental stages of life through participation in the workforce, resulting in increased public understanding of science and engineering. The ECR program will fund fundamental research on: human learning in STEM; learning in STEM learning environments, STEM workforce development, and research on broadening participation in STEM.

 

 

BRAIN Initiative: Integration and Analysis of BRAIN Initiative Data (R24)

(RFA-MH-17-257)

Letter of intent due December 19, 2016, and September 25, 2017. Proposals due January 19, 2017, and October 26, 2017.

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-MH-17-257.html

This FOA is one of three related FOAs aimed at building the informatics infrastructure for the BRAIN Initiative.  Each of these FOAs is aimed at building an infrastructure that will be used by a particular sub-domain of experimentalists rather than building a single all-encompassing informatics infrastructure now.  Building the infrastructure one experimental area at a time will ensure that the infrastructure is immediately useful to components of research community.  As our understanding of the brain improves, it may be possible to create linkages between these various sub-domain specific informatics efforts.  Applicants to any of these informatics FOAs should keep that goal in mind and build for the future even though the current efforts are more limited in scope.

The first FOA will create the data standards that are needed to describe the new experiments that are being created by or used in the BRAIN Initiative (RFA-MH-17-256).  The second FOA will create the data infrastructures that will house the data from multiple experimental groups (RFA-MH-17-255).  The final FOA (this FOA) supports the development of software to visualize and analyze the data.  The visualization/data analysis tools will make use of the standards and will be built so that they can be integrated into the data repositories; similarly, the data repositories are expected to use the standards created in awards under the first FOA.  Awardees under all FOAs will work together.  Awardees in all groups should budget for hackathons and other collaborative efforts that will be necessary to integrate the products produced by all awardees.  Collaborations with neuro-informatics efforts outside of the BRAIN Initiative are both welcome and are encouraged.

This FOA can be used to support several different, but related activities.  These include modifying existing analysis and visualization tools to deal with BRAIN Initiative data and integrating different types of BRAIN Initiative datasets.  It is also possible to propose the development of new tools, but that pathway may take longer than adapting existing tools that have already been developed and tested.  The tools must make use of relevant standards. 

Tools that integrate different types of data may link data across multiple scales or across different species.  The focus for integration tools in this FOA is mainly in finding the data and applying metrics for data alignment, standardization and normalization for further analysis.  Applicants who want to focus on the development of tools to analyze data across multiple scales should look at other FOAs such as those listed at https://www.imagwiki.nibib.nih.gov/. 

The tools must be user-friendly in accessing and analyzing data from appropriate data archives.  Ultimately, it is expected that much of the BRAIN Initiative data will be stored in a cloud environment, but that may not be initially true.  In general, the tools supported under this FOA should analyze/visualize data without the need to download them.  The tools should allow data to be combined for analysis/visualization from multiple locations. 

 

 

NIH: Bridges to the Doctorate (PAR-17-209) (R25)

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-17-209.html

Due September 25, 2017; September 25, 2018

The National Institutes of Health have reissued the Bridges to the Doctorate solicitation, now PAR-17-209. The over-arching goal of this National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) R25 program is to support educational activities that enhance the diversity of the biomedical research workforce.

To accomplish the stated over-arching goal, this FOA will support creative educational activities with a primary focus on Courses for Skills Development and Research Experiences. 

The Bridges to Doctorate Program is intended to provide these educational activities to Master's level students to increase transition to and completion of Ph.D.'s in biomedical sciences. A program application must include each educational activity, and describe how they will be synergized to make a comprehensive program.

This program requires partnerships between master's degree-granting institutions with doctorate degree-granting institutions.

Additionally, recruitment and retention plans are required as part of the application.

 

 

NIH: Bridges to the Baccalaureate (PAR-17-210) (R25)

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-17-210.html

Due September 25, 2017; September 25, 2018

The National Institutes of Health have reissued the Bridges to the Baccalaureate program, now PAR-17-210.

The over-arching goal of this  National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) Bridges to Baccalaureate  R25 program is to support educational activities that enhance the diversity of the biomedical research workforce. To accomplish the stated over-arching goal, this FOA will support creative educational activities with a primary focus on:

• Courses for Skills Development: For example, advanced courses in a specific discipline or research area, clinical procedures for research, or specialized research techniques.   

• Research Experiences: For example, for undergraduate students: to provide hands-on exposure to research, to reinforce their intent to graduate with a science degree, and/or to prepare them for graduate school admissions and/or careers in research.   

• Curriculum or Methods Development: For example, to improve biomedical science education, or develop novel instructional approaches or computer-based educational tools; to provide supplemental instruction for gateway courses; to develop "CURE" courses in community college first a

 

 

NIDDK Research Education Program Grants for Curriculum Development (R25) (PAR-15-138)

Due January 25, May 25, and September 25 annually through January 2018

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-15-138.html

The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports research educational activities that complement other formal training programs in the mission areas of the NIH Institutes and Centers. The over-arching goals of the NIH R25 program are to: (1) complement and/or enhance the training of a workforce to meet the nation’s biomedical, behavioral and clinical research needs; (2) enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral and clinical research workforce; (3) help recruit individuals with specific specialty or disciplinary backgrounds to research careers in biomedical, behavioral and clinical sciences; and (4) foster a better understanding of biomedical, behavioral and clinical research and its implications.

While the proposed research education program may complement ongoing research training and education occurring at the applicant institution, the proposed educational experiences must be distinct from those research training and research education programs currently receiving federal support. When research training programs are on-going in the same department, the applicant organization should clearly distinguish between the activities in the proposed research education program and the research training supported by the training program.

For the purposes of this FOA, the development or implementation of a specialized NIDDK-relevant education program, not otherwise available at the institution must be described in the application.  Explain how the development and implementation of the novel curriculum or method are linked to the purpose and objectives of the program and to the potential educational enhancement of intended participants. Explain how this curriculum is distinguished from other curricula within the existing educational infrastructure and framework of the applicant/participating institution(s).  Describe the utilization or modification of any existing curricula within the institution(s).

Budgets can be up to $100,000 of direct costs per year for up to five years, with 8% indirect costs.

Last updated 04/18/17 SS

 

 

NIDDK Research Education Program Grants for Summer Research Experiences (R25) (PAR-15-140)

Due January 25, May 25, and September 25 annually through January 2018

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-15-140.html

The over-arching goals of the NIH R25 program are to: (1) complement and/or enhance the training of a workforce to meet the nation’s biomedical, behavioral and clinical research needs; (2) enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral and clinical research workforce; (3) help recruit individuals with specific specialty or disciplinary backgrounds to research careers in biomedical, behavioral and clinical sciences; and (4) foster a better understanding of biomedical, behavioral and clinical research and its implications. This program will support research experiences for visiting undergraduate and graduate students. Examples of specific programmatic themes include, but are not limited to: specific disease processes of interest to NIDDK (e.g. diabetes, cystic fibrosis, inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, hepatitis, renal diseases, urologic or hematological disorders);  the translation of basic science discoveries to patient care ("bench to bedside" research); the relationships of specific organ systems (e.g., Endocrine, digestive, renal, hematopoietic) to health and illness;  the appreciation and integration of whole animal physiology in current biomedical research; information on how molecular, genomic and informatic techniques may be applied to NIDDK-relevant diseases and research; the development of therapeutics related to diseases relevant to the NIDDK.

Research education programs may complement ongoing research training and education occurring at the applicant institution, but the proposed educational experiences must be distinct from those training and education programs currently receiving Federal support. R25 programs may augment institutional research training programs (e.g., T32, T90) but cannot be used to replace or circumvent Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) programs.

Budgets can be up to $100,000 of direct costs per year for up to five years, with 8% indirect costs.

Last updated 04/18/17 SS

 

 

NIH: Perception and Cognition Research to Inform Cancer Image Interpretation (PAR-17-124 and PAR-17-125)

R21 and R01 proposals are due  May 30, 2017; September 26, 2017; May 30, 2018; September 26, 2018; May 30, 2019; September 26, 2019. Letters of intent are requested 30 days before the proposal deadline.

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-17-124.html (R21)

and

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-17-125.html (R01)

The program seeks to improve the accuracy of cancer diagnosis from medical imaging, a process that relies heavily on human judgment. An effective program for solving major problems in cancer image perception will require radiologists, pathologists, cytologists, nuclear medicine physicians and other cancer image specialists to collaborate with medical image perception researchers, cognitive psychologists, computer scientists, neuroscientists, and other basic researchers with expertise in image interpretation. In particular, a successful research program will involve a cyclic interaction between the clinical context and the basic research environment. The research program should identify a critical problem in cancer image perception, studies the underlying perceptual or cognitive mechanisms in a basic laboratory setting, and tests only the most promising hypotheses in the applied cancer imaging context. Differences between the laboratory and clinical findings can then inform the next round.

Basic research laboratories have the capacity to use highly controlled, synthetic stimuli that can be generated at will, and non-expert observers can be easily recruited at low cost, relative to professional cancer image interpretation specialist. This allows a perceptual laboratory to test a large number of hypotheses with less cost than would be expended on a single cancer image perception study with expert clinicians. However, findings from such studies are not guaranteed to generalize to professional observers interpreting real images in the clinical contexts. Thus, research must be grounded in the realities of clinical practice. This interactive strategy will allow an efficient winnowing of hypotheses so as to maximize the scientific impact of studies performed in in the applied cancer imaging context.

The program specifically excludes the development of new software tools or expert systems. However, studies of how human observers interact with such systems would be appropriate.

Projects that address international differences in cancer image interpretation performance and methods are encouraged.

Last updated 04/18/17 SS

 

 

NSF: Research in the Formation of Engineers (PD 17-1340)

Proposals will be accepted twice per year: September 27, 2017, and the fourth Wednesday in September annually after that, and January 24, 2018, and the fourth Wednesday in January annually after that

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=503584.

The National Science Foundation has revised its program on the professional formation of engineers. The new program is PD 17-1340, Research in the Formation of Engineers (RFE), https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=503584.

PIs without engineering education research or other social science research experience should consider applying to the Research Initiation in Engineering Formation solicitation (NSF 17-514), https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=503603, rather than Research in the Formation of Engineers. PIs can contact a cognizant program officer to discuss which program is more appropriate.

RFE makes awards of up to 3 years and $350,000 in the following areas:

1. Research Projects

RFE supports Foundational and Early-Stage/Exploratory research (see https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf13126) in all areas of engineering education. In addition to proposals on undergraduate engineering education, proposals are particularly welcome in the following areas:

•Lifelong learning by the engineering workforce

•Research on the impact of engineering education research. Proposals addressing this topic could investigate questions such as: How can we measure the impacts of engineering education research? What are effective strategies for scaling reforms? How can we translate knowledge from research to practice? What are the roles of networks and communities in achieving impact? RFE does not support efficacy, effectiveness, or scale-up studies for specific interventions.

•Research that addresses engineering formation at the two year college and graduate education levels in both formal and informal settings. Included in this topic are investigations of identity formation, normative cultures of engineering and how these cultures may disadvantage certain groups, development of professional and technical skills, etc.

•Research that investigates engineering in K12 settings. Research in this area could include understanding of approaches to engineering in K12, how to develop engineering ways of thinking, or the relationship between practices within the sciences or mathematics and engineering thinking.

•Research on the transitions between education levels, e.g. high school to two year college, high school to 4 year college/university, two year college to 4 year college/university, undergraduate to graduate school, education settings to the workforce or professoriate, etc.

•The relationship between engineering and the public. Proposals addressing this topic could consider the social impact of engineering solutions, citizen engineering, education of an informed public, etc.

Proposals submitted to the Research Projects category should have clear research questions informed by an appropriate theoretical framework and a research design that includes sampling, data collection, and data analysis methods. This category will not support proposals that seek funding primarily to develop tools, curriculum, or laboratories, or that seek to implement classroom innovations that have already been shown to be effective in engineering.

2. Design and Development Projects

RFE supports Design and Development projects (see https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf13126) that seek to develop and test new approaches in the following areas:

•Graduate education

•Transitions between education levels, e.g. high school to two year college, high school to 4 year college/university, two year college to 4 year college/university, undergraduate to graduate school, education settings to the workforce or professoriate, etc.

•K12, especially approaches to develop engineering thinking, or providing links between engineering, science, and mathematics

Design and Development projects for contexts other than those listed above will not be accepted. Proposals in this category should propose the design and development of new approaches that are informed by existing literature and theory. There should be clear objectives and the evaluation plan should be designed to determine if those objectives have been met. Projects cannot be solely demonstration projects, but must add to the engineering education literature to inform future work.

 

NSF CORE PROGRAMS

In 2017, the NSF Core Programs will not accept Large proposals. Medium proposals must include a formal broadening participation plan and a collaboration plan. “Breakthrough” will not be a specific class of proposal.

As in the past, an individual may participate in no more than two CCF, IIS, and CNS proposals in any annual cycle.

NSF: Computing and Communications Foundations: Core Programs (17-571)

Medium due September 27, 2017; Small due November 15, 2017

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17571/nsf17571.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

CCF supports three core programs as described below - Algorithmic Foundations (AF), Communications and Information Foundations (CIF), and Software and Hardware Foundations (SHF).

Small proposals are up to $500,000 over three years. Medium proposals are $500,001 to $1.2 million over up to four years. You may request 1-year Research Experiences for Undergraduates supplements on top of these amounts.

NSF: Information and Intelligent Systems (17-572)

Medium due September 27, 2017; Small due November 15, 2017

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17572/nsf17572.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

IIS supports three core programs: Cyber-Human Systems (CHS), Information Integration and Informatics (III), and Robust Intelligence (RI).

NSF: Computer and Network Systems (CNS) (17-570)

Medium due September 27, 2017; Small due November 15, 2017

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17570/nsf17570.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

CNS supports two core programs: Computer Systems Research (CSR) and Networking Technology and Systems (NeTS).

CSR is interested in this year in embedded and real-time systems, edge computing, and extensible distributed systems. NeTS highlighted areas are network analytics and management, wireless network architecture and protocols, next-generation virtualized networks/infrastructure, and optical networking.

 

 

NIH: Innovative Adaptations to Simplify Existing Technologies for Manipulation and Analysis of Glycans (U01) (RFA-RM-17-029)

Letter of intent due September 27, 2017; full proposal October 27, 2017

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-17-029.html

This Common Fund program aims to develop accessible and affordable new tools and technologies for studying carbohydrates that will allow biomedical researchers to significantly advance our understanding of the roles of these complex molecules in health and disease. This program will enable investigators who might not otherwise conduct research in the glycosciences, to undertake the study of carbohydrate structure and function.

This FOA solicits development of innovative adaptations of existing technologies to enable their use for readily identifying, manipulating, or analyzing glycans and their biological binding partners. This may encompass the adaptation of commonly used laboratory-based or computational tools to enable their facile application to glycoscience for the first time, as well as the adaptation of tools presently used by specialists in glycoscience to make them significantly more straightforward and accessible for non-specialists. It is possible that a project might simplify a current specialized approach by migrating it to a more commonly used platform, developing automation for data acquisition and interpretation, or redesigning the present tool to make it easier to use. This announcement differs from the related RFA-RM17-030 which solicits new or more effective tools or technologies, thus representing an expansion of existing technologies.

A primary roadblock hindering study of the roles of carbohydrates in most biological and disease pathways remains the limited availability of robust, affordable, and accessible tools and technologies that can be used by non-specialists to decipher the biochemical basis of glycan–protein and glycan-lipid interactions, and integrate this information with other platforms. Currently, the synthesis of carbohydrates and analysis of glycans and their binding proteins are carried out by a small cadre of highly specialized investigators with the requisite sophisticated, expensive, analytical equipment to perform these tasks. Analysis of glycan structure is hampered by a lack of glycan standards, including sets of isomers and related compounds with features that mimic the breadth of glycan diversity found in biological samples. Straightforward and accessible methods for identifying the carbohydrates that are attached to glycoproteins or glycolipids are not readily available, nor are techniques for determining the specificity of carbohydrate-binding proteins. Additionally, data generated from research on glycans and their binding proteins are not well-integrated with existing gene and protein databases. Therefore, attempts to complement gene and protein data with relevant glycan information are often frustrating, especially for those who are not glycoscience specialists.

NIH expects to make three awards for three years each from a $1 million pool. Awards will not exceed $200,000 per year for direct costs.

 

 

SRC/NIST nCORE program

Due September 29, 2017

https://www.src.org/compete/ncore/

The Semiconductor Research Corporation, in collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), has released a solicitation called nanoelectronic COmputing REsearch (nCORE). This program will support collaborative university research in the U.S. to develop key technologies to enable novel computing and storage paradigms with long-term impact on the semiconductor, electronics, computing, and defense industries. The nCORE program supports the National Strategic Computing Initiative (NSCI) through government-industry-academia collaborations. It will be driven by fundamental research on emerging materials and devices with the potential to achieve significantly improved efficiency, enhanced performance, and new functionalities, beyond the capability of conventional CMOS technologies. The new program is built upon the learning from the Nanoelectronics Research Initiative (NRI).

The  nCORE program has five research vectors:

Research Vector 1: Novel Computing Paradigms. Novel computing and storage paradigms, theory of operation, beyond conventional CMOS devices, beyond von Neumann architectures, and beyond classical information processing and sensing.

Research Vector 2: Device, Interconnect, and Materials Research. Fundamental material, device, and interconnect research to enable novel computing and storage paradigms.

Research Vector 3: Advanced Manufacturing and Nanofabrication. Advanced manufacturing and nanofabrication to enable the production of emerging devices and systems.

Research Vector 4: Innovative Metrology and Characterization. Innovative metrology and characterization to support basic device and material research, plus test platforms and standards to benchmark performance from device-level up to system-level.

Research Vector 5: Computational Models. Computational models to support basic research from emerging devices and materials to novel systems.

Universities should join together to achieve the depth and scope needed to address the technical content of this solicitation, as nCORE research will be funded through interdisciplinary, multi-university Centers. Proposed collaboration among PIs and universities in the form of Centers should identify a lead university and lead PI for purposes of an award. All awards are conditioned upon consummation of a sponsored research agreement with the Consortium. Cross-sharing between universities is strongly encouraged, but only U.S. universities will be considered for funding.

It is strongly encouraged that the number of PIs and universities involved be limited to a reasonable number for the total budget, to ensure that each PI is getting a critical mass of funding. No formal minimum amount per PI per year is being stipulated, but in general each PI should have sufficient funds to fully support at least 1-2 students or post-docs within this program.

Budgets should be around $1.5 million per year for three years, with two additional option years, beginning January 1, 2018. Cost sharing amounts are not specified in the solicitation but will be considered in the evaluation process.

 

 

NSF Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation 2018 (17-578)

A letter of intent is required and is due September 29, 2017. A pre-proposal is due October 25, 2017. Full proposals will be due February 23, 2018.

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17578/nsf17578.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_

This program will make awards in two topic areas:

 

1. Chromatin and Epigenetic Engineering (CEE)

 

2. Continuum, Compliant, and Configurable Soft Robotics Engineering (C3 SoRo)

 

Awards will be up to $2 million over four years.

 

CNAS and Bioengineering are looking into the first topic. Here is information on the second topic:

 

The EFRI topic Continuum, Compliant, and Configurable Soft Robotics Engineering (C3 SoRo) supports interdisciplinary research to create an engineering science of soft robotics. This research is expected to fill fundamental gaps in the understanding of soft robots characterized by continuum structures bearing loads with highly compliant materials or components. The soft robots studied will be capable of maintaining core functionality over a wide range of morphological configurations. Such robots promise substantial advantages over traditional rigid robots in accomplishing open-ended tasks in an unstructured environment and in physical interfaces with biological organisms, including humans. Robots with a mix of mobility, strength, and configurability matching or exceeding what is found in the natural world would allow unprecedented extension of human perception and action to inaccessible and hostile environments. Furthermore, wearable or implantable soft robots mechanically compatible with living soft tissue could mitigate disability or augment the natural abilities of the human body. To achieve these goals will require a re-engineering of power and information systems, the creation of new active soft material systems, the development of rigorous predictive models of deformation, and the formulation of new theories of movement and manipulation. While there have been numerous demonstrations of the exciting potential of soft robotics, a fundamental engineering framework is needed to fully realize the promise of these pioneering results. Such a framework would guide the emergence of a new field of soft robotics, driven by collaborations between researchers in engineering, computer science, biology, material science, chemistry, and mathematics.

An individual may be involved in only one proposal.

 

 

October

 

 

NSF Ceramics

Proposals accepted any time, subject to certain limits; see below.

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2016/nsf16597/nsf16597.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

The National Science Foundation has significantly revised its Ceramics program, now Program Solicitation 16-597. This program will make an estimated 20 awards per year from a $10 million pool to support supports fundamental scientific research in ceramics (e.g., oxides, carbides, nitrides and borides), glass-ceramics, inorganic glasses, ceramic-based composites and inorganic carbon-based materials. Projects should be centered on experiments; inclusion of computational and theory components is encouraged. The objective of the program is to increase fundamental understanding and to develop predictive capabilities for relating synthesis, processing, and microstructure of these materials to their properties and ultimate performance in various environments and applications. Research to enhance or enable the discovery or creation of new ceramic materials is welcome. Development of new experimental techniques or novel approaches to carry out projects is encouraged. Topics supported include basic processes and mechanisms associated with nucleation and growth of thin films; bulk crystal growth; phase transformations and equilibria; morphology; surface modification; corrosion, interfaces and grain boundary structure; and defects.

An investigator may only have one submission to CER at a given time. Since the Division of Materials Research (DMR) discourages the submission across DMR's disciplinary research activity programs (also called individual investigator award or IIA programs) of more than one proposal during the DMR annual proposal-submission window each fall, contravening this guidance with a submission to CER in the July to December period AND a submission to another IIA program in the DMR window (as a PI or co-PI) may result in the CER proposal being returned without review. In addition, investigators must wait at least 12 months between submissions to CER. Failure to observe these submission constraints may lead to the CER proposal being returned without review. Investigators with proposals submitted to the DMREF, PREM, MRSEC, and MIP programs may have a concurrent CER submission.

 

 

NSF: Condensed Matter and Materials Theory (CMMT) (NSF 16-596)

Proposals accepted any time, subject to restrictions below

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2016/nsf16596/nsf16596.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

. This program will make an estimated 40 awards per year from a $15 million pool to support theoretical and computational materials research in the topical areas represented in DMR's core or individual investigator programs, which include: Condensed Matter Physics (CMP), Biomaterials (BMAT), Ceramics (CER), Electronic and Photonic Materials (EPM), Metals and Metallic Nanostructures (MMN), Polymers (POL), and Solid State and Materials Chemistry (SSMC). The program supports fundamental research that advances the conceptual understanding of hard and soft materials, and materials-related phenomena; the development of associated analytical, computational, and data-centric techniques; as well as predictive materials-specific theory, simulation, and modeling for materials research. The broad spectrum of research supported in CMMT includes first-principles, quantum many-body, statistical mechanics, classical and quantum Monte Carlo, and molecular dynamics methods. Computational efforts span from workstations to advanced and high-performance scientific computing. Emphasis is on approaches that begin at the smallest appropriate length scale, such as electronic, atomic, molecular, nano-, micro-, and mesoscale, required to yield fundamental insight into material properties, processes, and behavior, to predict new materials and states of matter, and to reveal new materials-related phenomena. Approaches that span multiple scales of length and time may be required to advance fundamental understanding of materials properties and phenomena, particularly for polymeric materials and soft matter. Examples of areas of recent interest appear in the program description.

CMMT encourages potentially transformative theoretical and computational materials research, which includes but is not limited to: i) developing materials-specific prediction and advancing understanding of properties, phenomena, and emergent states of matter associated with either hard or soft materials, ii) developing and exploring new paradigms including cyber- and data-enabled approaches to advance fundamental understanding of materials and materials related phenomena, or iii) fostering research at interfaces among subdisciplines represented in the Division of Materials Research.

Research involving significant materials research cyberinfrastructure development, for example, software development with an aim to share software with the broader materials community, should be submitted to CMMT through Computational and Data-Enabled Science and Engineering (CDS&E) within its annual proposal submission window in the fall.

The submission date of a proposal from an investigator, whether PI or co-PI, to the CMMT program cannot be within 6 months before or after the submission date of any proposal from that same investigator, whether PI or co-PI, to any DMR disciplinary research activity program (also called individual-investigator program) or the Chemical Theory, Models and Computational Methods program in the Division of Chemistry. Failure to observe this submission constraint may lead to the CMMT proposal being returned without review. Investigators with proposals submitted to the DMREF, PREM, MRSEC, and MIP programs may have a concurrent CMMT submission. In addition, investigators must wait at least 12 months between submissions to CMMT.

Experimental Condensed Matter proposals should go through the Condensed Matter Physics program, PD 03-1710, due October 31 annually.

 

 

DOE Basic Energy Science (DE-FOA-0001664)

Open indefinitely; renews October 1 annually

https://science.energy.gov/~/media/grants/pdf/foas/2017/SC_FOA_0001664.pdf

The Office of Science of the Department of Energy hereby announces its continuing interest in receiving grant applications for support of work in the following program areas:

Advanced Scientific Computing Research

Basic Energy Sciences

Biological and Environmental Research

Fusion Energy Sciences

High Energy Physics

Nuclear Physics

 

 

BRAIN Initiative: Development and Validation of Novel Tools to Analyze Cell-Specific and Circuit-Specific Processes in the Brain (R01) (RFA-MH-17-220)

Letter of intent due October 2, 2016. Proposals due November 2, 2016 and October 13, 2017

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-MH-17-220.html

The purpose of this Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative is to encourage applications that will develop and validate novel tools to facilitate the detailed analysis of complex circuits and provide insights into cellular interactions that underlie brain function. The new tools and technologies should inform and/or exploit cell-type and/or circuit-level specificity. Plans for validating the utility of the tool/technology will be an essential feature of a successful application. The development of new genetic and non-genetic tools for delivering genes, proteins and chemicals to cells of interest or approaches that are expected to target specific cell types and/or circuits in the nervous system with greater precision and sensitivity than currently established methods are encouraged. Tools that can be used in a number of species/model organisms rather than those restricted to a single species are highly desired. Applications that provide approaches that break through existing technical barriers to substantially improve current capabilities are highly encouraged.   

This FOA seeks applications in areas including, but not limited to:

• Novel methods (non-genetic and genetic) to deliver active agents to specific neurons in particular neural circuits or brain areas with no or minimal cytotoxic effects.

• Novel methods for tagging individual neurons such that cellular components of a functional circuit can be explored.

• Novel trans-synaptic tracers that can be used both at the EM and light-microscopic level.

• Innovative approaches to reduce the time and cost of determining high resolution synaptic connectivity by electron microscopy or other approaches.

• Significantly improved viral-mediated gene delivery that targets specific cells or cell types in the nervous system.

• Innovative ways to use multiple vectors to deliver “split” gene products to limit and/or control expression in specific cell types.

• Novel, transgenic methods in multiple model species to allow more refined cell-specific and circuit-specific manipulation.

• Chemical or genetic engineering of blood brain barrier-crossing carrier agents (such as tagged antibodies or other tools) to allow delivery of specific cargoes (e.g., neuronal activity, effectors, tracers or sensors) to specific cells or circuits.

• Novel methods for non-invasive, targeted access to, or manipulation of, distinct cell types in defined circuits with spatio-temporal control.

• Novel trans-synaptic tracers that can work in retrograde and anterograde direction, or deliver cargoes to cells in the nervous system.

• Enhanced temporal and spatial resolution techniques for noninvasive molecular imaging of neuronal cells for in situ brain studies.

• Unique combinations of tools for multiplex analysis and/or manipulation of single cells in situ to maximize data content over many parameters (e.g., RNAs, proteins, metabolites, organelles, electrochemical dynamics, signal secretion/reception/transduction, cytoarchitecture or migratory changes).

• Innovative tools that provide significant advances in sensitivity, selectivity or spatiotemporal resolution of molecules/structures/activities within single cells in the brain and between ostensibly similar cells in situ (e.g., high resolution imaging of molecular interactions within single cells).

• Novel automated and scalable assays for high-throughput analysis of single cells in situ in the brain, including scalability of measured parameters in parallel, cell numbers and/or speed of processing.

• Unique systems-level single cell computational approaches to help define functional cell types and circuitry.

• New tools and approaches that minimize tissue and cell perturbations so that cell viability is maintained, allowing for multiple repeated measures in the same cell over time.

• Development of in situ sequencing using FISH and other sequencing methodologies

• Novel methods for visualizing epigenomic marks in neural cells.

• Novel computational approaches to analyze and integrate multi-scale datasets to better understand brain function.

• Innovative approaches to bridge scales of experimental approach. Studies that are able to explore molecular and cellular mechanisms of neural activity in broader contexts are encouraged.

• Novel techniques for integrating micro-scale connectivity data (e.g., by electron microscopy) with cellular or synaptic phenotypic information.

• Innovative molecular complementation methods to identify synaptic connections and determine their phenotypes.

• Novel uses of super-resolution light microscopic approaches for identifying synaptic connections and mapping micro-circuits.

• Development of cell type-specific molecular sensors and additional tools and approaches to address circuit-specific manipulation and monitoring.

 

 

NIH: Academic-Industrial Partnerships to Translate and Validate in vivo Cancer Imaging Systems (PAR-17-093)

Due March 1, 2017; June 7, 2017; October 3, 2017; March 1, 2018; June 7, 2018; October 3, 2018; March 1, 2019; and June 7, 2019.

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-17-093.html

This program seeks to stimulate translations of scientific discoveries and engineering developments in imaging or spectroscopic technologies into methods or tools that address problems in cancer biology, risk of cancer development, diagnosis, treatment, and/or disease status.

A distinguishing feature of each application will be formation of an academic-industrial partnership, which is a strategic alliance of investigators in academic, industrial, and any other entities who work together as partners to identify and translate a technological solution or mitigation of a cancer-related problem.

The goals for proposed technologies are imaging applications in clinical trials, clinical research, non-clinical research, and/or patient care. Among other possibilities, they may include pre-clinical imaging investigations or investigations that combine patient specimens and pre-clinical methods, or optimizations of methods across different commercial platforms, sites, or time.

There is no guidance in the solicitation on budget.

last updated 3/13/17 SS

 

 

NIH: Maximizing Investigators' Research Award for Early Stage Investigators (PAR-17-190)

Proposals will be accepted October 3, 2017; October 3, 2018; and October 3, 2019.

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-17-190.html

This program provides up to $250,000 per year of direct costs to early stage investigators (to oversimplify: PIs who are within 10 years of completing their Ph.D.s., and who have not been PIs of R-series NIH grants before) to carry out a portfolio of research related to the NIGMS mission. NIGMS supports research on technology development and computational approaches, as well as basic biomedical sciences, translational, and clinical research, and all phases of the scientific process, not only hypothesis testing. Within the scope of the MIRA, investigators will have the freedom to explore new avenues of inquiry that arise during the course of their research, as long as they remain within the mission of NIGMS.

It is anticipated that this funding mechanism will achieve the following:

• Increase the stability of funding for NIGMS-supported investigators, which could enhance their ability to take on ambitious scientific projects and approach problems more creatively;

• Increase flexibility for investigators to follow important new research directions as opportunities arise, rather than being bound to specific aims proposed in advance of the studies;

• More widely distribute funding among the nation's highly talented and promising investigators to increase overall scientific productivity and the chances for important breakthroughs;

• Reduce the time spent by researchers writing and reviewing grant applications, allowing them to spend more time conducting research; and

• Enable PD(s)/PI(s) to devote more time and energy to mentoring junior scientists in a more stable research environment.

 

 

NIH: Turkey-US Collaborative Program for Affordable Medical Technologies (R01) (NIH PAR-15-276)

Due February 5, June 5, and October 5 through 2017

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-15-276.html

The National Cancer Institute and National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering have released NIH PAR-15-276, Turkey-US Collaborative Program for Affordable Medical Technologies. This program invites applications from research partnerships formed between scientists from U.S. and Turkey to accelerate the development of appropriate affordable diagnostic and therapeutic technologies, which address medical needs in low-middle resource settings. Appropriate medical technologies are those that are useable, cost effective, sustainable, and effective in meeting a significant clinical need in a lower-middle resource setting in different world regions.

Applications appropriate for this FOA should have the following attributes:

1. Contain research partnerships formed by Turkish and US investigators, and other participants to assure the group has a critical mass of essential skills and knowhow to perform the translational aims proposed. Propose to develop, enhance, adapt, optimize, validate, and translate a technology, method, assay, device, or system for molecular diagnosis or in vitro imaging or spectroscopy for (a) current commercially supported system, (b) next-generation system, (c) quality assurance and quality control, (d) validation and correlation studies, (e) quantitative methods, (f) related research resource, or (g) other possibilities.

2. Propose to mitigate or solve a targeted cancer problem in risk assessment, cancer detection, diagnosis, staging, treatment, and/or treatment monitoring.

3. Propose to accomplish substantial progress toward delivery of their translated product as a new capability for use by end users in clinical cancer research, or clinical cancer care.

This FOA is not intended to support basic research projects that do not emphasize translational processes of adaptation, optimization, and validation for a targeted cancer problem. An application proposing a biological research problem as its essence, (where the technology and methods have already been adapted, optimized, validated and established) is not appropriate for this FOA.

 

NIH: Bioengineering Research Partnerships (PAR-16-242)

Proposals will be accepted February 5, June 5, and October 5 annually through February 2019

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-16-242.html

The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement is to encourage collaborations between the life and physical sciences that: 1) apply a multidisciplinary bioengineering approach to the solution of a biomedical problem; and 2) integrate, optimize, validate, translate or otherwise accelerate the adoption of promising tools, methods and techniques for a specific research or clinical problem in basic, translational, or clinical science and practice. An application may propose design-directed, developmental, discovery-driven, or hypothesis-driven research and is appropriate for small teams applying an integrative approach to increase our understanding of and solve problems in biological, clinical or translational science.

 

 

NIH: Synthetic Biology (PAR-17-334)

Due October 5, 2017

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-17-334.html or https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=295813

This program will support research to advance the understanding and application of synthetic biology for human health. It will support 1) the development of innovative tools and technologies in synthetic biology and 2) their application in biomedical research and human health. An integrative research plan based on collaborations of synthetic biologists with computational scientists, cell biologists, engineers, and/or physician scientists is strongly recommended. Early stage investigators in Synthetic Biology are especially encouraged to apply.

 

This FOA encourages the development of tools and technology to tackle challenges in biomedical research and in cell-based therapies and diagnostics. Specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to, those listed below.

• Cell-free and cell-based systems for testing and analyzing biological systems and for the efficient and scalable synthesis of complex biological products (a) Cell-free (prototyping genetic circuits, discovering and evolving enzymes, and conducting biomolecular reactions) (b) Cell-based (materials and pharmaceutical production, microbiome reprogramming, diagnostics)

• Natural and engineered biological circuits for implementing regulation and decision-making strategies in cells (modeling, analysis, design, and use of biological circuits, cell-cell communication, gene regulation, computation strategies)

• Expanding biochemical functionality (novel genetic alphabets, changing molecular machinery of the cell, constructing genomically recoded organisms, genetically encoded reporters)

• Advanced genome editing techniques for manipulating DNA (computational algorithms, zinc finger nucleases, TAL effector nucleases, CRISPR-Cas9)

• Design and evolution strategies to construct biological systems (directed evolution, continuous evolution, multiplexed evolution)

 

 

mHealth Tools for Individuals with Chronic Conditions to Promote Effective Patient-Provider Communication, Adherence to Treatment and Self-Management (PA-14-180) (R01)

Proposals will be accepted June 5 and October 5, 2017

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=254068

 

 

NSF/DOE Partnership on Advanced Frontiers in Renewable Hydrogen Fuel Production Via Solar Water Splitting Technologies 2014-2016 (NSF Program Solicitation 14-511)

Letters of intent will be due December 13, 2013; October 06, 2014; October 07, 2015; and the first Wednesday in October, annually thereafter. Full Proposals will be due February 10, 2014; December 11, 2014; December 08, 2015; and the second Tuesday in December, annually thereafter.

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2014/nsf14511/nsf14511.htm

This program will make 3-5 awards, each for three years at $150,000 to $250,000 per year to promote the discovery and development of advanced technologies for solar hydrogen production.

This solicitation promotes the science and technology of advanced materials systems and interfacial processes as key enablers for highly efficient and durable photochemical and/or thermochemical solar water-splitting. Specific topical areas are listed below though other aspects that hold promise to improve solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency, durability and cost with respect to traditionally studied photochemical and thermochemical processes may also be considered.

Key fundamental processes that must be better understood to enable the enhancement of efficiency, stability and ultimately cost in photochemical and/or thermochemical solar water-splitting processes include, but are not limited to, the following:

-- Material/light interactions over the full solar spectrum fundamental to photon absorption and to the conversion of photon energy to thermal and electrochemical energy;

-- Thermodynamic properties of materials systems fundamental to driving thermal, chemical and electrochemical processes and sub-processes;

-- Thermal and radiative properties of materials systems fundamental to heat transfer efficient thermal management;

-- Optoelectronic properties of materials systems fundamental to efficient separation and transport of photo-excited charge carriers to relevant reaction sites for the reactions and sub-reactions in water dissociation cycles;

-- Kinetic properties of materials at interfaces fundamental to the facilitation of chemical and electrochemical reactions and sub-reactions in water dissociation cycles, as well as the mitigation of corrosion and other competing side-reactions;

-- Physical and surface chemistry of multi-phase materials systems fundamental to compound and inter-phase formation, mass diffusion properties, and junction and interface formation and properties;

-- Validated ab-initio models to support "Materials by Design" methodologies for bulk materials and interfaces with physical, optical, chemical and electronic properties optimized for solar to hydrogen conversion.

Relevant topic areas considered responsive to this solicitation include, but are not limited to the theory-guided discovery and development of:

-- Novel multi-component solid-state materials with physical, optical, chemical and electronic properties optimized for photochemical and/or thermochemical solar to hydrogen conversion;

-- Innovative materials junctions and interfaces with physical, optical, chemical and electronic properties optimized for photochemical and/or thermochemical solar to hydrogen conversion;

-- Innovative catalysts, co-catalysts and appropriate linking apparatus to optimize reaction kinetics of the primary and secondary reactions in photochemical and/or thermochemical cycles for stable and efficient water dissociation;

-- Efficient and stable materials and sub-systems for separation of multi-phase reactants and products, including hydrogen/oxygen gas separation in direct photochemical water dissociation and reactant/product management in electrolytic stages of hybrid thermochemical cycles for water splitting.

Proposals for incremental improvements to traditionally-studied solar water-splitting materials systems incapable of achieving solar hydrogen fuel production rates of 100 J/s of chemical energy per m2 of solar energy collection (e.g., thermochemical processes based on ceria or zinc oxide, or photochemical processes based on titanium dioxide, tungsten trioxide or iron oxide) will NOT be considered responsive. Additionally, proposals relying on precious metals or other non-sustainable materials systems for enhancement of efficiency or durability will NOT be considered.

There is a limit of one proposal per PI, but no limit on the number of proposals per institution.

 

 

IARPA: Ithildin: novel sorbent materials for chemical sampling and storage (IARPA-BAA-17-04)

Due October 6, 2017

https://www.iarpa.gov/index.php/research-programs/ithildin/ithildin-baa

This program will make multiple awards to develop novel sorbent materials for chemical sampling and storage, with a focus on providing enhanced sorbent capabilities at the molecular, nanoscale and mesoscale level of the sorbent itself, independent of a sampling system design. In essence, we want to make the sorbent itself “smart”, improving efficiency and capability by shifting functionality from the macroscopic sampler system or filter to the level of the basic chemical interactions between sorbent and sorbate.

The program has four thrust areas. Proposals that address all four areas are preferred, but they will accept proposals that are more narrow focused:

1. Selective Sorption Enhancement - Preferential sorption of target chemicals or chemical classes of interest, while retaining the capability to collect broad-spectrum background.

2. Clutter Rejection - Preferential rejection of high-abundance clutter materials, such as water or hydrocarbons.

3. Temporal Fidelity - Capability to activate/deactivate the sorbent material based on mechanical, physical, temporal, or chemical triggers.

4. Remote Indicators - A remotely detectable signature indicative of sorption of a specific target or target class.

Representative applications for these materials are passive sequentially timed sample collection; large area monitoring and protection; safe sampling and decontamination; and smart filters.

The period of performance is 18 months, and IARPA sets out milestones and performance targets to be met along the way.

There is no information about how much money is on the table.

 

 

CEC: Advancing the Resilience and Environmental Performance of California's Electricity System (GFO 16-311)

Due October 9, 2017

http://www.energy.ca.gov/contracts/GFO-16-311/

This program will support Applied Research and Development projects that reduce the environmental and public health impacts of electricity generation and make the electricity system less vulnerable to climate impacts. Projects must fall within the following project groups:

Group 1: Empirical Studies of Aerosols to Boost Precipitation Enhancement Programs of Investor Owned Utilities (up to $1.4 million). This is about cloud seeding.

Group 2: Air Quality and Climate Benefits of Targeted Retrofit Buildings and Renewable Distributed Generation (DG) in Dense Urban Areas Including Disadvantaged Communities (up to $1.1 million per award; $3.3 million in this category). This group will investigate the synergies between increasing efficiency of homes and buildings, urban distributed generation, and community renewable microgrids and how these synergies can be leveraged, leading to improved air quality and substantially reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Doubling the efficiency of the existing stock of buildings and homes will be extremely difficult and potentially costly, but targeted retrofits can yield substantial benefits. At the same time, urban community microgrids could be used to reduce the vulnerability of the electricity system to extreme weather-related events and climate change.

Group 3: Building on the Cal-Adapt Platform to Deliver Actionable Information in Support of Electricity Sector Resilience (up to $900,000). The overarching goal of this group is to provide tools, data, and visualizations that translate peer-reviewed research results regarding climate-related risks and electricity sector resilience into actionable information that can be used by electricity sector stakeholders to integrate climate considerations into planning, risk management, and operations.

Group 4: Small Grants (up to $200,000 per award; $800,000 in this category). The Energy Commission proposes to implement a streamlined process for a competitive solicitation for exploratory projects in energy-related environmental research, including research that addresses the needs of environmental justice communities and the state’s most vulnerable communities. Funded projects must 1) directly address environmental issues associated with the electricity system, 2) have the strong potential to substantially benefit  California’s electricity ratepayers, including environmental justice communities, in IOU territories, 3) be based upon collection and analysis of data obtained directly from designed experiments and/or field measurements/surveys/interviews rather than pure paper studies, and 4) target to produce results that are useful for electricity stakeholders and/or policy makers.

A bidders’ workshop is scheduled for 9:30 a.m. July 14 and is accessible via Webex. Proposals are due October 9.

 

 

NSF: Training-based Workforce Development for Advanced Cyberinfrastructure (CyberTraining) (17-507)

Due January 18, 2017; October 9, 2017; and the second Monday in October annually after that.

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17507/nsf17507.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click.

This program will support innovations in any domain supported by NSF ENG, GEO, MPS, or CISE Directorates to prepare, nurture and grow the national scientific workforce for creating, utilizing, and supporting advanced cyberinfrastructure (CI) that enables cutting-edge science and engineering and contributes to the Nation's overall economic competitiveness and security.

NSF invites proposals that identify the community needs in training and education outside the classroom that require significant innovations - including the challenge of broadening CI access and adoption by those communities and institutions with low CI adoption as well as underrepresented groups. These proposals shall engage the relevant set of partners required as investigators, collaborators, resource providers, and early adopters, and include plans for effective outreach to the stakeholder communities. Proposals shall articulate well-designed programs with potential for significant impacts, which can serve as templates and provide curricular material and supporting resources to be adopted by other institutions and potentially by sub-communities/sub-disciplines. A key challenge is to design or update suitable training curriculum that will receive buy-in from the larger community of stakeholders as relevant, high quality and adoptable.

As investigators conceive of novel training models and activities, they are challenged to explore the following aspects for short-term impacts: (i) preparing a better scientific workforce for advanced CI; (ii) broadening adoption and accessibility both as users and contributors of institutional, regional, and national shared computing and data resources by various disciplines, institutions, and groups; (iii) complementing and leveraging the state of art in curricular offerings and material in academia, industry and elsewhere; (iv) creating alliances and backbones for collective impact; (v) providing on-demand, personalized accessibility; (vi) exploring innovative ways of drawing students into computational disciplines (X+Computing and Computing+X); (vii) identifying areas of workforce demand and career pathways; (viii) innovating in training/certification models, curriculum, educational material and activities, and their sustainability; and (ix) leveraging and contributing to NSF cyberinfrastructure and research projects (such as XSEDE, NanoHub, CyVerse, LIGO, and NHERI).

There are three tracks for submissions:

(i) CI Professionals (CIP): aimed at the training and career pathway development of research cyberinfrastructure and professional staff who develop, deploy, manage, and support effective use of advanced CI for research.

(ii) Domain science and engineering (DSE): aimed primarily at the communities of CI Contributors and sophisticated CI Users, and aligned with the research and education priorities of the participating domain directorates.

(iii) Computational and data science literacy (CDL): aimed at the CI User community at the undergraduate level.

Awards will be $300,000 to $500,000 each and will be for up to three years. NSF expects to make 10-15 awards per year.

There is no limit on the number of proposals per institution, but an individual may be PI or Co-PI on only one proposal.

 

NSF: Research Experiences for Teachers in Engineering and Computer Science: Supplements and Sites (17-575)

Site proposals due October 10, 2017; September 19, 2018; and the third Wednesday in September annually (limit 3 per institution per year)

Supplement proposals accepted any time

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17575/nsf17575.htm

This solicitation covers both RET Sites and RET Supplements. Supplements can be for new proposals or for existing awards. In all cases, the purpose is to provide research opportunities in engineering or computer/information science to teachers (K-12 and community college).

Supplements: You can request up to $10,000 per teacher per year. In a new NSF proposal, you should check with the RET program officer for ENG or CISE as appropriate, and also check with the program officer for the proposal you are submitting. We add some supplementary documents to your proposal. The money for the supplement is on top of any budget limit for the underlying proposal. If you have an existing award and want to add an RET to it, you contact your current program officer and the appropriate RET program officer, and then go ahead with a submission for a supplement in Fastlane.

Sites: An RET Site builds active, long-term collaborations between K-12 STEM teachers, full-time community college faculty, and university faculty and students. The teachers participate as a group in a focused, hands-on research experience. The university team must include faculty, graduate and undergraduate students, and industrial advisors. The program should include having graduate students go to the schools during the subsequent academic year to support the integration of the RET curricular materials into classroom activities. Site awards can be up to $600,000 over three years.

UCR can submit up to three Site proposals per year – no more than two in engineering and one in computer/information science. One Site proposal is being developed in the Dean’s Office now (Marko Princevac is organizing it). The PI of a Site proposal must be a full-time, tenured or tenure-track faculty member in engineering or computer science. If you are interested in a Site proposal, please contact me, and we will see about how to integrate ideas (or not).

 

 

DOE: Advanced Power Electronics Design for Solar Applications (DE-FOA-0001740)

Concept paper due October 12; full proposal December 15. THIS IS A LIMITED SUBMISSION; DO NOT SUBMIT A PROPOSAL WITHOUT CAMPUS CLERANCE.

https://eere-exchange.energy.gov/Default.aspx#FoaId53bdf98a-0c8e-4bc1-9a5c-81810df79f69 or https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=297217

This program will support will fund research that can enable significant reductions in the lifetime costs of power electronics (PE) for solar photovoltaic (PV) energy that align with meeting the SunShot 2030 goals, and likewise enable versatile control functionalities to support grid integration of solar PV for enhanced grid services.

There is a limit of one proposal per topic area. I am notifying RED about this so we can set up a campus limited submission process. (It is not clear whether we can submit more than one concept paper per topic area.)

Proposals will be accepted in the following topic areas:

Lowering Cost and Improving Equipment Reliability (Topic Area-1). This Topic Area targets early-stage research and development of solar PV inverter/converter designs that reduce system cost, increase efficiency and equipment reliability that reduce solar PV lifetime costs, in support of SunShot’s 2030 cost goals.

Enhanced Functionality for Grid Services (Topic Area-2). This Topic Area targets early-stage research and development of modular, multi-purpose power electronics designs that enable value-added grid and/or customer-owned solar energy solutions for enhanced services. The enhanced application functionality should be a modular extension from the base solar PE inverter/converter. The physical PE system therefore is the design optimized, base inverter/converter plus modular equipment (and/or control logic) to enable the enhanced application – conceptually presented prior in Figure 4. To have market impact, the value generated over the lifetime of the PE solution by the enhanced functionality will need to be greater than the cost to add and maintain the functionality.

DOE expects to make 10-15 awards ranging from $500,000 to $3 million each over up to 36 months. Cost sharing of at least 20% of total project costs (i.e., 1:4) is required.

 

 

CEC: Renewable Intermediate Fuel Production for Jet Fuel in Heavy-Duty Transportation Sector (GFO-17-901)

Due October 13, 2017

http://www.energy.ca.gov/contracts/other_research.html#GFO-17-901

This program will make 1-2 awards totaling $3 million for projects that can produce an intermediate from renewable California resources for existing refineries to convert to jet fuel. The project itself must produce at least 50,000 gallons of bio-intermediate jet fuel. We should target a biomass source with a volume of 100 tons per day or greater.

Cost sharing of 25% (1:4) is required.

The Energy Commission will hold a bidders’ workshop at 10 a.m. August 25 in Sacramento, but it will be available via webinar.

 

 

NIH Imaging - Science Track Award for Research Transition (I/START) (R03) (PAR-15-326)

Proposals will be accepted February 16, June 16, and October 16 through June 2018.

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-15-326.html

This program makes small exploratory R03 grants in support of (1) investigators who are interested in neuroimaging but have not worked in this area before or (2) established investigators who want to do proof-of-concept research on a new imaging approach. Funding is available for new approaches to imaging or proof-of-concept of established imaging techniques in a new neuroscience domain.

It is important to note that research proposed under the I/START program need not be conducted in drug-abusing populations or involve drug administration; however, the potential relevance to understanding drug abuse must be clearly delineated.

R03 grants are for up to $150,000 of direct costs over one year.

 

 

ONR: National Oceanographic Partnership Program (BAA N00014-17-S-B016)

Due October 16, 2017

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=295516

The program has three areas of interest:

1. CubeSat Sensors for Investigating Littoral Ocean & Atmosphere Dynamics. ONR expects to make up to 10 awards at up to $150,000 per year for up to 2 years. The goal of this NOPP solicitation is to seek proposals from academia, private industry and government laboratories to work in partnership to develop a CubeSat-based resource of remotely sensed observations of littoral ocean and atmosphere dynamics that, preferably, can be directly assimilated into or provide boundary conditions for numerical models. These variables and their interactions include many or all of the following: bathymetry, sea surface temperature, sea surface salinity, sea surface height, surface vector winds, directional wave spectra, currents, internal wave activity, river discharge, sea-ice characterization, cloud characterization, wave-current interaction, turbidity or ecology, amongst others.

2. Improved & Routine Production, Stewardship and Application of the Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Data. ONR expects to make up to 2 awards at $300,000 to $700,000 per year for up to 5 years. Successful proposals must have substantive team partnerships working together to ensure that research into improved retrievals is directly applied within operational SST production cycles resulting in improved SST data and products. Applicants must describe how they will improve data interoperability through common protocols including metadata and uniform quality-control methods.

3. In-situ Ocean Sensor Research & Technology Development. ONR expects to make up to 22 awards at up to $500,000 per year for up to 3 years. Letters of intent are required for this topic by October 16. This program has several subtopics:

3A. Power Reduction and/or Miniaturization of In-situ Ocean Sensors and Improved On Board Processing (Arctic/Antarctic to Tropical and full water column)

3B. Sensor Research & Advanced Technology

3B1. Soft Matter Electronics and Ocean Sensors

3B2. In-situ Ocean Sensors for “OMICs”

3B3 Next Generation Autonomous In-situ Ocean Sensors

3C. Improving Technology Readiness Levels of Existing & Emerging Autonomous In-situ Ocean Sensors

Teaming is required. A team must consist of at least two of these three types of entities: academic institution, industry (including non-profits and NGOs), and government agencies.

Proposals in Topics 1 and 2 are due October 16, 2017. Topic 3 requires a letter of intent by October 16, and proposals are due January 29, 2018.

 

 

NIH: Exploratory Research for Technology Development (PAR-17-046)
Proposals will be accepted February 16, June 16, and October 16 through February 2019

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-17-046.html

This program will make R21 awards (up to $275,000 of direct costs over up to two years) for exploratory research leading to the development of innovative technologies for biomedical research. The program will recognize and reward high risk approaches with potential for significant impact.  Projects will entail a high degree of risk or novelty, which will be offset by a correspondingly high potential impact. However, the possible impact is likely to be far off. Application of the proposed technology to specific biomedical questions is considered beyond the scope of the program, and should not be included. Preliminary data demonstrating feasibility of the proposed approach indicates that the project is beyond the scope of this program and therefore unsuitable for this funding opportunity. 

Projects should be justified on the basis of a strong potential to advance biomedical research if successful. This rationale should justify the investment of resources in the proposed technology in terms of its potential as an enabling tool for research. The rationale should be broad. Technologies specific to a single organism, system, or disease are not appropriate.

Project aims should focus on either: (a) exploratory research to differentiate possible technical approaches to determine the one most likely to be successful, or (b) demonstrating feasibility of a specific proposed approach.

Projects should have a high risk of failure. Feasibility of a project should not be supported by preliminary data. Projects with preliminary data should be submitted under the Focused Technology Research and Development program.

Projects should be focused on technical questions regarding the development of a novel research tool. Projects sufficiently mature to include application to biomedical research problems are inappropriate for this program and should be submitted under the Parent R01 FOA.

 

 

NIH Exploratory/Developmental Bioengineering Research Grants (R21) (PA-16-040)

Due February 16, June 16, and October 16 annually through October 2018

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-16-040.html

This R21 grant program will support applications which establish the feasibility of technologies, techniques or methods that: 1) explore a unique multidisciplinary approach to a biomedical challenge; 2) are high-risk but have a considerable pay-off; and 3) develop data which can lead to significant future research. An EBRG application may propose hypothesis-driven, discovery-driven, developmental, or design-directed research and is appropriate for evaluating unproven approaches for which there is minimal or no preliminary data.

Ten NIH institutes are participating. Three put specific areas of interest into the solicitation, so what you see below reflects only the interests of those three institutes. If you have an idea that falls outside of these areas, you very well still could have an idea that fits in the program.

The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) is interested in the development of diagnostics, therapeutics, surgical technologies, computational and systems biology, biomaterials and nanotechnology, as applied to the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and non-malignant hematologic mission areas of the Institute. Topic areas include, but are not limited to, the development of: i) noninvasive and nondestructive 3D imaging methods for in vivo monitoring, ii) techniques for metabolic imaging of disease progression, iii) research tools such as molecular imaging probes, microfluidics, and nanotechnologies, and iv) novel diagnostic and medical devices. Of special interest are new bioengineering approaches to improve cardiovascular repair and regeneration, artificial lungs as a bridge to transplant or for treatment of lung failure, and new additive solutions, storage bags and/or new processes to enhance blood cell function and survival after storage and transfusion. Additionally, the interests of NHLBI include research tools, methods and technologies that facilitate therapeutic advances and behavioral changes to address problems in energy balance, weight control, and obesity (see: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HL-07-007.html)

The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) seeks research in building complex 3-dimensional in vitro human musculoskeletal and skin tissue models to study developmental biology, physiology, and disease pathogenesis as well as for drug discovery and toxicity studies. NIAMS is not interested in applications are developing 3D tissues for transplantation, or engineering non-human tissue models, or developing simple 3-D models that do not go significantly beyond those currently in use, such as human skin equivalents composed of only normal keratinocytes and fibroblasts.

The Office of Research on Women’s Health (ORWH) (http://orwh.od.nih.gov/) is interested in biomedical research that specifically addresses the purpose of the FOA within the context of sex differences research and diseases that disproportionately affect women and girls.

The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) is interested in 1) The development of technologies and integrated devices for improved personal exposure assessment. A particular emphasis is on the development of technologies that will enable untargeted, agnostic, associations between exposures and disease in support of the exposome concept. 2) The development of technologies to enable research into the mechanisms of response to environmental exposures. This includes the development of ‘omics technologies and systems modeling techniques to assess the differential response of biological networks to environmental perturbations. 3) The development of moderate to high throughput screens for the assessment of potential toxicants. A particular emphasis is on the development of model systems that more closely reflect the response of humans including engineered 3D tissue systems originating from human tissues and induced pluripotent cells and the development of humanized animal models such as mouse models with enhanced genetic diversity similar to human populations.

This program is open to January 2016, and will accept proposals on February 16, June 16, and October 16 annually until then.

 

 

mHealth Tools for Individuals with Chronic Conditions to Promote Effective Patient-Provider Communication, Adherence to Treatment and Self-Management (PA-14-181) (R21)

Proposals will be accepted June 16 and October 16, 2017

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-14-181.html

For those unfamiliar with NIH-speak, an R01 is the regular research grant mechanism. You must have preliminary data to submit an R01 proposal. An R21 is an exploratory or proof-of-concept project designed to generate data sufficient to support a subsequent R01. R21s can be up to 2 years and $275,000 of direct costs.

The purpose of this initiative is to stimulate research utilizing Mobile Health (mHealth) tools aimed at the improvement of effective patient-provider communication, adherence to treatment and self-management of chronic diseases in underserved populations. With the rapid expansion of cellular networks and substantial advancements in Smartphone technologies, it is now possible - and affordable - to transmit patient data digitally from remote areas to specialists in urban areas, receive real-time feedback, and capture that consultation in a database. These mHealth tools, therefore, may facilitate more timely and effective patient-provider communication through education communication around goal setting, treatment reminders, feedback on patient progress and may improve health outcomes. This announcement encourages the development, testing and comparative effective analysis of interventions utilizing mHealth technologies. There is also an interest in studying mHealth technologies in underserved populations. 

Research Objectives

For NINR this FOA encourages research for individuals with chronic diseases.   Research topics of interest are to:

•Develop, test, and compare effective strategies that incorporate mHealth tools to improve patient-provider communications

•Develop, test, and compare mHealth tools for improved adherence to treatment

•Develop, test and compare mHealth tools for effective self-management

•Develop, test, and/or compare technologies that incorporate interventions for adherence and self-management strategies

•Develop, test, and/or compare mHealth technologies or tools in underserved populations 

•For NIBIB, topics of particular interest are to:

•Develop and test integrated, portable imaging technologies for monitoring health and as part of point-of-care diagnosis and treatment

•Develop and test tools to enhance the visualization and psychophysical understanding of complicated health information on mobile devices with the local cultural context

•Develop and test decision support systems to provide guidance and a framework for shared decision-making with medical professionals based on best available evidence

•Develop and test networked, citizen-driven approaches to engaging and retaining people in improving their health

•Develop technology that incorporates telemetry and remote access in the acquisition, analysis and monitoring of biomedical data

•Develop software and hardware tools for telehealth technology and studies that have broad applications or are in specific focus areas.

 

 

NSF Industry-University Cooperative Research Centers Program (IUCRC) (NSF 17-516)

Pre-proposals accepted October 18, 2017, and the third Wednesday in October annually after that, plus the third Wednesday in April annually

Full proposals accepted December 20, 2017, and the third Wednesday in December annually after that; plus the third Wednesday in June annually

https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf17516

The National Science Foundation has updated its IUCRC program, now Program Solicitation 17-516. The IUCRC program develops long-term partnerships among industry, academe, and government. The Centers are catalyzed by a (very small) grant plus technical support from the NSF and are primarily supported by industry Center members.

Each Center is established to conduct research that is of interest to both the industry members and the Center faculty. An IUCRC contributes to the nation's research infrastructure base and enhances the intellectual capacity of the engineering and science workforce through the integration of research and education. As appropriate, an IUCRC uses international collaborations to advance these goals within the global context.

The PI at any institution participating in an IUCRC proposal must be a tenured faculty member. Waivers for non-tenured personnel or non-faculty personnel may be requested when petitioned by the PI's supervisor (Chairman of the Department or the Dean) in advance of the Preliminary Proposal. The PI must act as the initial Site director. A PI can only have one active IUCRC Site award at any given time.

Preliminary proposals are now mandatory. NSF has also updated its language regarding its goals for the IUCRC program.

UCR’s tech transfer office is available to help develop ideas.

 

 

BRAIN Initiative: Next-Generation Invasive Devices for Recording and Modulation in the Human Central Nervous System (UG3/UH3) (RFA-NS-17-005)

Due December 21, 2016, and October 18, 2017

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-17-005.html

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to encourage investigators to pursue translational and clinical studies for recording and/or stimulating devices to treat nervous system disorders and better understand the human brain. The program will utilize a cooperative agreement mechanism to support the submission of an Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) for a Significant Risk (SR) study or obtain Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval for a Non-Significant Risk (NSR) study, and a subsequent small clinical study (e.g., Early Feasibility Study). The small clinical study should provide data to answer key questions about the function or final design of a device.  This final device design may require most, if not all, of the non-clinical testing on the path to more advanced clinical trials and market approval. The clinical study is expected to provide information that cannot be practically obtained through additional nonclinical assessments (e.g., bench top or animal studies) due to the novelty of the device or its intended use. Activities supported in this program include implementation of clinical prototype devices, non-clinical safety and efficacy testing, design verification and validation activities, and pursuit of regulatory approval for, and implementation of, a single small clinical study. 

As part of the BRAIN Initiative, NIH has initiated a Public-Private Partnership Program (BRAIN PPP) that includes agreements (Memoranda of Understanding, MOU) with a number of device manufacturers willing to make such devices available, including devices and capabilities not yet market approved but appropriate for clinical research.  In general it is expected that the devices' existing safety and utility data will be sufficient to enable new IRB NSR or FDA IDE approval without need for significant additional non-clinical data. 

 

 

BRAIN Initiative:  Next-Generation Invasive Devices for Recording and Modulation in the Human Central Nervous System (U44) (RFA-NS-17-007)

Due December 21, 2016, and October 18, 2017

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NS-17-007.html

This is a reissue of RFA-NS-16-011.

Due December 21, 2016, and October 18, 2017

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to encourage small business concerns (SBCs) to pursue translational non-clinical studies and clinical studies for recording and/or stimulating devices to treat nervous system disorders and thereby better understand the human brain.  The program will utilize a cooperative agreement mechanism to support the non-clinical studies necessary for the submission of an Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) for a Significant Risk (SR) study or to obtain Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval for a Non-Significant Risk (NSR) study, and the subsequent small clinical study (e.g., Early Feasibility Study).  Activities supported in this program include implementation of clinical prototype devices, non-clinical safety and efficacy testing, design verification and validation activities, and pursuit of regulatory approval for, and implementation of, a single small clinical study. The small clinical study should provide data to answer key questions about the function or final design of a device.  This final device design may require most, if not all, of the non-clinical testing on the path to more advanced clinical trials and market approval.  The clinical study is expected to provide information that cannot be practically obtained through additional non-clinical assessments (e.g., bench top or animal studies) due to the novelty of the device or its intended use.

 

 

NIH: Spatial Uncertainty: Data, Modeling, and Communication

R21 (PA-15-009): http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-15-009.html

Proposals accepted March 16, July 16, and November 16 through the end of 2017

R01 (PA-15-010): http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-15-010.html

Proposals accepted February 5, June 5, and October 5 through the end of 2017

R03 (PA-15-011): http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-15-011.html

Proposals accepted February 16, June 16, and October 16 through the end of 2017

This FOA encourages a team of epidemiologists, statisticians, and experts in data visualization or health communication to attack the spatial uncertainty issue thoroughly. This FOA will facilitate multidisciplinary collaborations among scientists to promote research in identifying, quantifying, reducing, and communicating spatial uncertainty in health research to improve disease control and prevention. The FOA will also facilitate integration of data collection, information technology, visualization tools, statistical models, and health communication to reduce spatial uncertainty in planning, implementing and evaluating disease control programs. - See more at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-15-009.html#sthash.JHQdV6V1.dpuf

NIH defines spatial uncertainty as the lack of, or the error in, knowledge about an object’s geographic position (i.e., longitude, latitude, and altitude), which leads to uncertainty about the spatial relationship among its neighbors. For example, an error in a patient's residential address will introduce spatial uncertainty about where the patient lives and this error will further bias any association between the patient's health status and specific environmental exposure.

Last updated 03/13/17 SS

 

 

NIH: High Throughput Screening to Discover Chemical Probes

R21 exploratory: PAR-12-283 (http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-14-283.html

R21 due March 16, July 16, and November 16 through September 2017. Letters of intent are required one month before proposal submission.

R01 standard: PAR-14-284 (http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-14-284.html

R01 due February 5, June 5, and October 5 through September 2017. Letters of intent are required one month before proposal submission.

Through this FOA, NIH wishes to stimulate research in 1) discovery and development of novel, small molecules for their potential use in studying disease treatments relevant to the missions of the participating NIH Institutes, and 2) discovery and/or validation of novel, biological targets that will inform studies of disease mechanisms. Emphasis will be placed on projects that provide new insight into important disease targets and processes. For example, applications may involve emerging therapeutic targets and mechanisms for the discovery of chemical probes that may lead to further development of therapeutics or provide insight into the biology of relevant diseases and health.

The projects submitted to this FOA are expected to already have an implementable HTS assay and an adequate collection of compounds to be screened. Some assay adaptation may be performed with the aim of optimizing parameters such as reagent preparation/consumption, assay readout, and automation in parallel or multiplex screening format. Such adaptation work will be accomplished through a joint effort between the assay submitting investigator and the screening facility responsible for implementing the assays.

The HTS may include the following several primary assay configurations: (1) a biochemical or cell based assay against a large collection of compounds; (2) a whole animal (e.g., zebrafish, mouse, etc.), organoid, or 3-D culture based primary assay against a focused collection of compounds; (3) a high-value primary cell or tissue sample based primary assay against a focused collection of compounds; (4) an array of biochemical or cell based primary assays against a focused collection of compounds; (5) an affinity based primary assay of multiple protein targets against a very large library of compounds (e.g., DNA encoded compound library, etc.).

Last updated 03/13/17 SS

 

 

Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace (NSF 17-576)

Medium projects are due October 10, 2017.

Frontier projects are due October 20, 2017.

Small projects are due November 15, 2017.

Cybersecurity Education projects are due December 13, 2017.

https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?WT.z_pims_id=504709&ods_key=nsf17576

This is released in collaboration with the Semiconductor Research Corporation. Sponsors of SaTC are the Directorates for Computer & Information Science & Engineering, the Directorate for Social, Behavioral, & Economic Sciences, the Directorate for Mathematical & Physical Sciences, the Directorate for Engineering, and the Directorate for Education & Human Resources.

There will be no “Large” category this year; instead, there is a new class of proposal called Frontier. Small projects are up to $500,000 over three years. Medium projects are up to $1.2 million over up to four years. Frontier projects are $5 million to $10 million over up to five years. You can embed Research Experiences for Undergraduate supplements on top of these amounts.

An individual can participate as a PI, co-PI or senior personnel on no more than five SaTC proposals. There is a limit of:

-- two proposals designated as CORE and/or STARSS (across Small, Medium, and Frontier); and

--two proposals designated as TTP (either Small or Medium); and

-- one proposal designated as EDU.

The goals of the Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace (SaTC) program are aligned with the Federal Cybersecurity Research and Development Strategic Plan (RDSP) and the National Privacy Research Strategy (NPRS) to protect and preserve the growing social and economic benefits of cyber systems while ensuring security and privacy. The RDSP identified six areas critical to successful cybersecurity R&D: (1) scientific foundations; (2) risk management; (3) human aspects; (4) transitioning successful research into practice; (5) workforce development; and (6) enhancing the research infrastructure. The NPRS, which complements the RDSP, identifies a framework for privacy research, anchored in characterizing privacy expectations, understanding privacy violations, engineering privacy-protecting systems, and recovering from privacy violations. In alignment with the objectives in both strategic plans, the SaTC program takes an interdisciplinary, comprehensive and holistic approach to cybersecurity research, development, and education, and encourages the transition of promising research ideas into practice.

In addition to the project size classes, proposals must be submitted pursuant to one of the following designations, each of which may have additional restrictions and administrative obligations as specified in this program solicitation.

-- CORE: This designation is the main focus of the SaTC research program, spanning the interests of NSF's Directorates for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE), Engineering (ENG), Mathematical and Physical Sciences (MPS), and Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (SBE). Interdisciplinary proposals are welcomed to CORE.

-- EDU: The Education (EDU) designation will be used to label proposals focusing entirely on cybersecurity education. Note that proposals that are designated as EDU have budgets limited to $300,000 and durations of up to two years.

-- STARSS: The Secure, Trustworthy, Assured and Resilient Semiconductors and Systems (STARSS) designation will be used to label proposals that are submitted to the joint program focused on hardware security with the Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC). The STARSS designation may only be used for Small proposals. This designation has additional administrative obligations.

-- TTP: The Transition to Practice (TTP) designation will be used to label proposals that are focused exclusively on transitioning existing research results to practice. The TTP designation may only be used for Small and Medium proposals.

Every proposal should identify a primary and secondary topic area from this list:

•Access control

•Authentication

•Biometrics

•Cryptography, theory

•Cryptography, applied

•Cyber-physical systems (CPS)

•Data science

•Forensics

•Formal methods

•Hardware, security architecture

•Hardware, security design

•Information trustworthiness

•Intrusion detection

•Language based security

•Mathematics and statistics

•Privacy, theory

•Privacy, applied

•Social networks

•Social, behavioral and economic science

•Software

•Systems

•Usability and human interaction

•Wired networking

•Wireless networking

 

 

NSF Information and Intelligent Systems (IIS): Core Programs (NSF 16-581)

Medium due October 19, 2016, and October 19 annually after that

Large due October 19, 2016, and annually after that

Small due November 16, 2016, and November 16 annually after that

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=13707&org=IIS&sel_org=IIS&from=fund

This program is largely unchanged from last year. One significant change is that under Additional Solicitation Specific Review Criteria, reviewers are now asked to provide specific evaluation of whether key personnel, and especially lead PIs, have allocated adequate time for both their individual technical contributions and the leadership of collaborative activities necessary to realize the synergistic effects of larger-scale research.

IIS supports three core programs: Cyber-Human Systems (CHS), Information Integration and informatics (III), and Robust Intelligence (RI).

CHS explores potentially transformative and disruptive ideas, novel theories, and technological innovations in computer and information science that accelerate both the creation and understanding of the complex and increasingly coupled relationships between humans and technology with the broad goal of advancing human capabilities: perceptual and cognitive, physical and virtual, social and societal. In addition, CHS research seeks to improve our fundamental understanding of how, and the processes by which, interactive systems should be designed to achieve human-computer symbiosis and computer-mediated human communication, collaboration, and competition. It explores the designs of socio-technical systems that lead to new ways of perceiving the self, groups, organizations, communities, and society, along with the broader impacts of these designs on both individuals and society It extends the reach of computing to new communities and furthers understanding of the newly-created communities made possible by computing.

III projects may address data of unprecedented scale, complexity, and rate of acquisition, as well as issues of heterogeneity and complexity with innovative approaches and deep insights. Projects may support the diverse functionalities and processing needs for data, information, and knowledge from disparate and uncoordinated sources, or cope with the changing landscape of computing platforms at scales ranging from small mobile devices to potentially global-scale cloud and networked computing resources. Successful proposals should demonstrate effectiveness in dimensions such as scalability, interactivity, or scientific, technological, or societal impact. III-funded projects should address contemporary applications of societal importance through advances in information integration and informatics. Projects may deal with one or more facets of the full knowledge lifecycle, including creation, acquisition, selection, storage, display, and preservation, use, and re-use of data, information, and knowledge for decision-making and action. Ultimately, the deep scientific insights and advanced technologies resulting from III-funded projects will transform the functions and uses of data, information, and knowledge in society.

RI encompasses all aspects of the computational understanding and modeling of intelligence in complex, realistic contexts. In contrast to systems that use limited reasoning strategies or address problems in narrow unchanging contexts, robust intelligence may be characterized by flexibility, resourcefulness, creativity, real-time responsiveness and long-term reflection, use of a variety of modeling or reasoning approaches, ability to learn and adapt performance at a level of intelligence seen in humans and animals, and awareness of and competence in larger natural, built, and social contexts. The RI program advances and integrates the research traditions of artificial intelligence, computer vision, human language research, robotics, machine learning, computational neuroscience, cognitive science, and related areas.

Small awards are up to $500,000 over up to three years. Medium awards are $500,001 to $1.2 million over up to four years. Large projects are $1.2 million to $3.0 million over up to five years.

In any October-November cycle, an individual may participate in no more than two Core Programs solicitations: CNS, CCF, and IIS.

 

 

NSF: MacroSystems Biology and Early NEON Science: Research on Biological Systems at Regional to Continental Scales (16-521)

Due March 15, 2016, October 17, 2016, and the third Monday in October annually after that

http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf16521

. This program will make three classes of awards for projects that carry out quantitative, interdisciplinary, systems-oriented research on biosphere processes and their complex interactions with climate, land use, and invasive species at regional to continental scales.

The three categories of awards are:

Category 1: Early Career Awards (ECA). Awards to early career scientists employing innovative and creative approaches to advance understanding of regional to continental scale processes and cross-scale interactions. These awards will be limited to a maximum of $300,000 over a two year duration. To be eligible, you must have a tenure-track appointment and be untenured as of the October 1 following proposal submission.

Category 2: Full Research Awards (FRA). Awards to support Macrosystems Biology Research or Innovative Training to conduct MacroSystems research. These awards may be up to 5 years in duration.

Category 3: Early NEON Science Awards (ENSA). Grants that do not otherwise fit into the macrosystems biology focus on regional to continental scale questions, but 1) use or leverage NEON data and/or NEON samples/specimens to address innovative ecological or other biological questions, and/or 2) develop analytic or computational tools that enhance the use and value of NEON data. These awards may be up to 5 years in duration.

NEON is the  National Ecological Observatory Network. Projects that encourage use of data or resources from NEON are especially encouraged.

 

 

CEC: Demonstrate Business Case for Advanced Microgrids in Support of California’s Energy and GHG Policies (GFO-17-302)

Due October 20, 2017

http://www.energy.ca.gov/contracts/epic.html#GFO-17-302

This program will make multiple awards in three categories:

Group 1: Demonstration of Standardized High-DER Penetration, Renewable-Based, Resilient and Commercially Viable Microgrids Located at California Military Bases, Ports, and Native American Tribes within IOU Service Territories.

Group 2: Demonstration of Standardized High-DER Penetration, Renewable-Based, Resilient and Functional  Microgrids located at California Disadvantaged Communities  within IOU Service Territories.

Group 3: Demonstration of Standardized High-DER Penetration, Renewable-Based, Resilient and Commercially Viable Microgrids in IOU Territories that are not Proposed Under the Group 1 and Group 2 Projects.  Examples of These Microgrid Locations are  Local Communities, Rural Areas, Industrial Complexes, University and College Campuses, Local School Campuses and Other Similar Demonstration Opportunities where Microgrids Provide Clear and Definable Added Value to the Selected End User.

UCR can submit only one proposal as lead. I am including Lynda Jenkins on this message so we can set up a campus process for that. A principal grant applicant may only submit one application in Group 1, 2 or 3 for this GFO. If the principal applicant submits multiple applications, the Energy Commission staff will randomly select one application to be evaluated, reviewed and scored.  Any other application submitted by the same applicant will be returned without additional action. However, there is no limit on the number of applications that an entity can participate in as a subcontractor or match funding partner.

Note that UCR is not served by an IOU, so we can’t be a demo site.

Projects must fall within the “technology demonstration and deployment” stage, which involves the installation and operation of pre-commercial technologies or strategies at a scale sufficiently large and in conditions sufficiently reflective of anticipated actual operating environments to enable appraisal of operational and performance characteristics, and of financial risks.

Awards will be $2 million to as much as $7 million under certain circumstances. Cost sharing of 20% (1:5) is required for projects up to $5 million and 25% (1:4) if the request is between $5 million and $7 million.

A bidders’ conference is scheduled for August 17 in Sacramento and August 23 in Los Angeles.

 

 

NSF: Energy for Sustainability (PD 16-7644)

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505339

Due October 20 annually

The goal of the Energy for Sustainability program is to support fundamental engineering research that will enable innovative processes for the sustainable production of electricity and fuels, and for energy storage. Processes for sustainable energy production must be environmentally benign, reduce greenhouse gas production, and utilize renewable resources. Research projects that stress molecular level understanding of phenomena that directly impacts key barriers to improved system level performance (e.g. energy efficiency, product yield, process intensification) are encouraged. Proposed research should be inspired by the need for economic and impactful conversion processes. All proposals should include in the project description, how the proposed work, if successful, will improve process realization and economic feasibility and compare the proposed work against current state-of-the-art. Highly integrated multidisciplinary projects are encouraged.

Current topics of interest are the following:

1. Electrochemical Energy Systems

2. Organic Photovoltaics:

The duration of unsolicited awards is typically one to three years.  The typical award size for the program is $100,000 per year. Collaborative proposals that include a strong multi-disciplinary component are typically $150,000 per year. Proposals requesting a substantially higher amount than this, without prior consultation with the Program Director, may be returned without review.

 

 

NSF/NSFC (China): Joint Research on Environmental Sustainability Challenges (DCL 17-099)

Due October 20, 2017

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17099/nsf17099.jsp?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

Every project must involve at least one PI from the U.S. and one PI from China. The overall theme is "Innovations at the Nexus of Food, Energy, and Water Systems (INFEWS: U.S.-China),” and there are two specific areas of interest:

1.Quantitative and computational modeling of a FEW system. The first theme is to significantly advance understanding of FEW systems with advanced modeling that investigates the coupled biotic, abiotic, engineered and social systems and the couplings and feedback mechanisms among FEW system components. Projects may use a wide variety of different systems analyses and modeling approaches to explore the functional dynamics of FEW systems. Some projects might integrate across models from multiple disciplinary domains, including, but not limited to agricultural, behavioral, computational, cultural, ecological, economic, energy, engineering, geospatial, hydrological, mathematical, and social. Systems chosen for study must be examined to define/quantify spatially heterogeneous FEW systems responses to various internal and external driving factors that occur on both short and long timescales. FEW systems operation must be investigated under the influence of single and multiple driving factors. FEW models should allow for investigation of system resiliency, attempt to identify thresholds, and explore system response to variability among critical parameters singly, in combination, or at extreme values.

2.Innovative human and technological solutions to critical FEW systems problems. The second theme is to develop and examine innovative solutions that address specific FEW system challenges and enhance FEW systems" resilience and sustainability. This research may explore sustainable management solutions, examine drivers of resource consumption, and study ways to extend resources via methods such as reducing, recycling, recovery, and reuse. Projects should demonstrate how the envisioned solution will contribute to a healthy balance across sectors and places, and how sectors and places might vary over temporal and spatial scales. Specific areas of interest include, but are not limited to:  (a) Efficient Use of Resources: Scientific and engineering solutions to improve FEW systems efficiencies should be coupled with new knowledge of how ecological, economic, social, and physical systems interact. Projects can address production, consumption and waste and how FEW systems interact with each other in technical and non-technical domains. (b) Conversion and/or Reuse of Waste Materials: New devices, sensors, catalysts, nanomaterials, smart filters, and processes may be required to detect, remove, destroy or convert compounds of concern from waste streams, or to turn waste constituents into valuable primary or secondary products. Both technical aspects and human factors will be important in the decision-making process. (c) System Sustainability: INFEWS: US-CHINA aims to encourage research on innovative strategies for appropriate management of natural and physical systems, including consideration of use, access, and governance. Sustainability solutions might incorporate physical sciences, biological sciences, computer sciences, institutional, economic, behavioral, and technical components.

NSF will fund the U.S. researchers of winning teams (up to a total of $500K for 4 years for each winning proposal), while NSFC will fund the China researchers of winning teams (up to a total of 3 million yuan for 4 years for each winning proposal). In total, no more than 7 joint NSF-NSFC project grants are expected to be funded. Each proposal must include a management plan that clearly specifies the role of team researchers from both the U.S. and China, and the mechanisms through which close collaboration will be assured. The management plan is not to exceed 3 pages and is to be included in the supplementary document file of the electronic submission.

 

 

NSF: Biotechnology and Biochemical Engineering (PD 16-1491)

Due October 20 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505334

The Biotechnology and Biochemical Engineering (BBE) program supports fundamental engineering research that advances the understanding of cellular and biomolecular processes in engineering biology and eventually leads to the development of enabling technology for advanced manufacturing and/or applications in support of the biopharmaceutical, biotechnology, and bioenergy industries, or with applications in health or the environment.  A quantitative treatment of biological and engineering problems of biological processes is considered vital to successful research projects in the BBE program.

Fundamental to many research projects in this area is the understanding of how biomolecules, cells and cell populations interact in their environment, and how those molecular level interactions lead to changes in structure, function, phenotype, and/or behavior.  The program encourages highly innovative and potentially transformative engineering research leading to novel bioprocessing and manufacturing approaches, and proposals that address emerging research areas and technologies that effectively integrate knowledge and practices from different disciplines while incorporating ongoing research into educational activities.

Major areas of interest in the program include:

•Metabolic engineering and synthetic biology for biomanufacturing

•Quantitative systems biotechnology

•Tissue engineering and stem cell culture technologies

•Protein engineering, biocatalysis and enzyme technologies

•Single cell dynamics and modeling

•Development of novel "omics" tools for biotechnology applications

NOTE: For proposals involving any aspect of sustainable chemistry and engineering, including but not limited to biochemistry or physical chemistry, consider making proposal submissions to this program (1491) with the Proposal Title as:  SusChEM: Title of Your Proposal'. 

 

 

NSF: Biological and Environmental Interactions of Nanoscale Materials (PD 18-1179)

Full proposals are accepted any time

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505424&WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

The Biological and Environmental Interactions of Nanoscale Materials program is part of the The Biological and Environmental Interactions of Nanoscale Materials program is part of the Environmental Engineering and Sustainability cluster, which includes also 1) Environmental Engineering; and 2) Environmental Sustainability.

The goal of the Biological and Environmental Interactions of Nanoscale Materials program is to support research to advance fundamental and quantitative understanding of the interactions of biological and environmental media with nanomaterials and nanosystems. Materials of interest include one- to three-dimensional nanostructures, heterogeneous nano-bio hybrid assemblies, and other nanoparticles. Such nanomaterials and systems frequently exhibit novel physical, chemical, and biological behavior in living systems and environmental matrices as compared to the bulk scale. This program supports research that explores the interaction of nanomaterials in biological and environmental media.    

Research areas supported by the program include:

·         Characterization of interactions at the interfaces between nanomaterials and nanosystems with surrounding biological and environmental media, including both simple nanoparticles and complex and/or heterogeneous composites;

·         Development of predictive tools based on the fundamental behavior of nanostructures within biological and ecological matrices to advance cost-effective and environmentally benign processing and engineering solutions over full life material cycles;

·         Examining the transport, interaction, and impact of nanostructured materials and nanosystems on biological systems;

·         Simulations of nanoparticle behavior at interfaces, in conjunction with experimental comparisons, and new theories and simulation approaches for determining the transport and transformation of nanoparticles in various media.

Research in these areas will enable the design of nanostructured materials and heterogeneous nanosystems with optimal chemical, electronic, photonic, biological, and mechanical properties for their safe handling, management, and utilization.

Innovative proposals outside of these specific interest areas may be considered. However, prior to submission, it is recommended that the PI contact the Program Director to avoid the possibility of the proposal being returned without review.

The duration of unsolicited awards is generally one to three years. The typical award size for the program is $100,000 per year. Proposals requesting a substantially higher amount than this, without prior consultation with the Program Director, may be returned without review.

Last updated 4/6/17 MB

 

 

NSF: Cellular and Biochemical Engineering (PD 17-1491)

Due October 20 annually

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505334

The Cellular and Biochemical Engineering program is part of the Engineering Biology and Health cluster, which includes also 1) Engineering of Biomedical Systems; 2) Biophotonics; 3) Nano-Biosensing; and 4) Disability and Rehabilitation Engineering.

The Cellular and Biochemical Engineering (CBE) program supports fundamental engineering research that advances the understanding of cellular and biomolecular processes in engineering biology and eventually leads to the development of enabling technology for advanced biomanufacturing in support of the therapeutic cells, biochemical, biopharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.  A quantitative treatment of biological and engineering problems of biological processes is considered vital to successful research projects in the CBE program.

Fundamental to many research projects in this area is the understanding of how biomolecules, cells and cell populations interact in the biomanufacturing environment, and how those molecular-level interactions lead to changes in structure, function, and behavior.  The program encourages highly innovative and potentially transformative engineering research leading to novel bioprocessing and biomanufacturing approaches, and proposals that address emerging research areas and technologies that effectively integrate knowledge and practices from different disciplines while incorporating ongoing research into educational activities.

Major areas of interest in the program include:

•Metabolic engineering and synthetic biology for biomanufacturing

•Quantitative systems biotechnology

•Cell culture technologies

•Protein and enzyme engineering

•Single cell dynamics and modeling in the context of biomanufacturing

•Development of novel "omics" tools for biomanufacturing applications

 

 

NSF: Biophotonics (PD 17-7236)

Due October 20 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505337

The Biophotonics program is part of the Engineering Biology and Health cluster, which includes also 1) Cellular and Biochemical Engineering; 2) Engineering of Biomedical Systems; 3) Nano-Biosensing; and 4) Disability and Rehabilitation Engineering.

The goal of the Biophotonics program is to explore the research frontiers in photonics principles, engineering and technology that are relevant for critical problems in fields of medicine, biology and biotechnology.  Fundamental engineering research and innovation in photonics is required to lay the foundations for new technologies beyond those that are mature and ready for application in medical diagnostics and therapies.  Advances are needed in nanophotonics, optogenetics, contrast and targeting agents, ultra-thin probes, wide field imaging, and rapid biomarker screening. Low cost and minimally invasive medical diagnostics and therapies are key motivating application goals.

Research topics in this program include:

•Macromolecule Markers

•Low Coherence Sensing at the Nanoscale

Neurophotonics

•Micro- & Nano-photonics

Optogenetics

 

 

NSF Environmental Engineering (PD 16-1440)

Due October 20 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505332&WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

The goal of the Environmental Engineering program is to support transformative research which applies scientific and engineering principles to avoid or minimize solid, liquid, and gaseous discharges, resulting from human activities on land, inland and coastal waters, and air, while promoting resource and energy conservation and recovery.  The program also fosters cutting-edge scientific research for identifying, evaluating, and monitoring the waste assimilative capacity of the natural environment and for removing or reducing contaminants from polluted air, water, and soils. Any proposal investigating sensors, materials or devices that does not integrate these products with an environmental engineering activity or area of research may be returned without review.

Major areas of interest include:

•Enhancing the availability of high quality water supplies: Development of innovative biological, chemical and physical treatment processes to meet the growing demand for water; investigation of processes that remove and degrade contaminants, remediate contaminated soil and groundwater, and convert wastewaters into water suitable for reuse; investigation of environmental engineering aspects of urban watersheds, reservoirs, estuaries and storm water management; investigation of biogeochemical and transport processes driving water quality in the aquatic and subsurface environment.  (Please note that water treatment research targeting chemical or physical separation processes (e.g. membranes) should be submitted to the Chemical and Biological Separations Program, CBET 1417).

•Fate and transport of contaminants of emerging concern in air, water, solid waste, and soils: Investigate the fate, transport and remediation of potentially harmful contaminants and their by-products. (Please note that research concerning nanomaterials should be submitted to Biological and Environmental Interactions of Nanoscale Materials, CBET 1179).

 

 

NSF: General & Age-Related Disabilities Engineering (PD 16-5342)

Due October 20 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505335

The General & Age Related Disabilities Engineering (GARDE) program supports fundamental engineering research that will lead to the development of new technologies, devices, or software that improve the quality of life of persons with disabilities. Research may be supported that is directed toward the characterization, restoration, and/or substitution of human functional ability or cognition, or to the interaction of persons with disabilities and their environment. Areas of particular interest are disability-related research in neuroengineering and rehabilitation robotics. Emphasis is placed on significant advancement of fundamental engineering knowledge that facilitates transformative outcomes. We discourage applications that propose incremental improvements. Applicants are encouraged to contact the Program Director prior to submitting a proposal.

GARDE no longer directly supports Undergraduate Engineering Design projects targeting the needs of people with disabilities (PwD), but will rather shift interest to supporting Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REUs) activities focused on improving the quality of life for PwD. These REUs can be funded as supplements to existing GARDE awards or by submitting proposals for REU Sites through NSF 13-542, which will be reviewed in collaboration with the Program Director for the GARDE program.  We encourage those interested in supporting undergraduate student participation in active research focused on improving the quality of life of PwD to apply to the REU program following the respective solicitation guidelines.

Innovative proposals outside of the above specific interest areas may be considered. However, prior to submission, it is recommended that the PI contact the Program Director to avoid the possibility of the proposal being returned without review.

The duration of unsolicited awards generally is one to three years. The typical award size is approximately $100,000 per year.  Proposals requesting a substantially higher amount than this, without prior consultation with the Program Director, may be returned without review.

 

 

NSF Process Systems, Reaction Engineering and Molecular Thermodynamics (PD 18-1417)

Proposals accepted anytime

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505458

The Process Separations program supports research focused on novel methods and materials for separation processes, such as those central to the chemical, biochemical, bioprocessing, materials, energy, and pharmaceutical industries.  A fundamental understanding of the interfacial, transport, and thermodynamic behavior of multiphase chemical systems as well as quantitative descriptions of processing characteristics in the process-oriented industries is critical for efficient resource management and effective environmental protection.  The program encourages proposals that address long standing challenges and emerging research areas and technologies, have a high degree of interdisciplinary work coupled with the generation of fundamental knowledge, and the integration of education and research.

Research topics of particular interest include fundamental molecular-level work on:

--Design of scalable mass separating agents and/or a mechanistic understanding of the interfacial thermodynamics and transport phenomena that relate to purification of gases, chemicals, or water

--Design or improvement of mass separation agents or processes that are based upon, and advance, transport principles

--Downstream purification of biologically derived chemicals for increased throughput

--Field (flow, magnetic, electrical) induced separations and other innovative approaches that address a significant reduction in energy and/or materials requirements in the process industries

 

 

NSF Fluid Dynamics (PD 17-1443)

Due October 20 annually

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=13365

The Fluid Dynamics program is part of the Transport Phenomena cluster, which includes also 1) Combustion and Fire Systems; 2) Particulate and Multiphase Processes; and 3) Thermal Transport Processes.

The Fluid Dynamics program supports fundamental research toward gaining an understanding of the physics of various fluid dynamics phenomenon. Proposed research should contribute to basic scientific understanding via experiments, theoretical developments, and computational discovery. Encouraged are proposals that focus on high Reynolds number turbulence scaling and modeling.

Major areas of interest and activity in the program include:

•Turbulence and Transition: high Reynolds number experiments; large eddy simulation; direct numerical simulation; transition to turbulence; 3-D boundary layers; separated flows; multi-phase turbulent flows; flow control and drag reduction.

•Bio-inspired Fluid Mechanics: fluid-structure interactions; biological flow processes.

•Flow of Complex Fluids: non-Newtonian fluid mechanics; viscoelastic flows.

•Micro- and Nano-fluidics: micro-and nano-scale flow phenomena.

•Interfacial Interactions and Instabilities: hydrodynamic stability; droplet interactions.

•Wind and Ocean Energy Harvesting: focused on fundamental fluid dynamics phenomena associated with renewal energy.

Proposals on wind and ocean energy harvesting and on environmental flows could be submitted to the program when the proposed research is focused on fundamental fluid dynamics phenomena or on development of novel computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approaches, rather than applications or devices and materials. Innovative proposals outside of these specific interest areas may be considered; however, prior to submission, it is recommended that the PI contact the Program Director to avoid the possibility of the proposal being returned without review.

Fluid-Structure Interactions: This is a NSF-AFOSR (Air Force Office of Scientific Research) joint funding area focusing on theory, modeling and/or experiments for high-speed applications. A small number of awards (depending on availability of funds and proposal quality) will be provided, and will be jointly reviewed by NSF and AFOSR using the NSF panel format. Actual funding format and agency split for a particular winning proposal will be determined after the proposal selection process. The AFOSR program that participates in this initiative is the Program on High Speed Aerodynamics (Program Officer: Dr. Ivett Leyva).

 

 

NSF Particulate and Multiphase Processes (PD 17-1415)

Due October 20 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505330

The Particulate and Multiphase Processes program is part of the Transport Phenomena cluster, which includes also 1) Combustion and Fire Systems; 2) Fluid Dynamics; and 3) Thermal Transport Processes.

The goal of the Particulate and Multiphase Processes (PMP) program is to support fundamental research on physico-chemical phenomena that govern particulate and multiphase systems, including flow of suspensions, drops and bubbles, granular and granular-fluid flows, behavior of micro- and nanostructured fluids, and self-assembly/directed-assembly processes that involve particulates. The program encourages transformative research to improve our basic understanding of particulate and multiphase processes with emphasis on research that demonstrates how particle-scale phenomena affect the behavior and dynamics of larger-scale systems. Although proposed research should focus on fundamentals, a clear vision is required that anticipates how results could benefit important applications in advanced manufacturing, energy harvesting, transport in biological systems, biotechnology, or environmental sustainability. Collaborative and interdisciplinary proposals are encouraged, especially those that involve a combination of experiment with theory or modeling. Proposals whose main focus is on the synthesis of particles are not encouraged.

Major research areas of interest in the program include:

•Multiphase flow phenomena: Dynamics of particle/bubble/droplet systems, behavior of structured fluids (colloids/ferro-fluids), granular flows, rheology of multiphase systems, and novel approaches that relate micro- and nanoscale phenomena to macroscale properties and process-level variables.

•Particle science and technology: Aerosols, production of particles and polymer-particle complexes with engineered properties, self-assembly, directed assembly, and template-directed assembly of particles into functional materials and devices.

•Multiphase transport in biological systems: Analysis of physiological processes, applications of functionalized nanostructures in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics.

•Interfacial transport: Dynamics of particles and macromolecules at interfaces, kinetics of adsorption and desorption of nanoparticles and surfactants and their spatial distributions at interfaces, complex molecular interactions at interfaces, formation of interfacial complexes that affect the dynamics of particles.

 

 

NSF Biophotonoics (PD 16-7236)

Due October 20 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505337

The goal of the Biophotonics program is to explore the research frontiers in photonics principles, engineering and technology that are relevant for critical problems in fields of medicine, biology and biotechnology.  Fundamental engineering research and innovation in photonics is required to lay the foundations for new technologies beyond those that are mature and ready for application in medical diagnostics and therapies.  Advances are needed in nanophotonics, optogenetics, contrast and targeting agents, ultra-thin probes, wide field imaging, and rapid biomarker screening. Low cost and minimally invasive medical diagnostics and therapies are key motivating application goals.

Research topics in this program include:

•Macromolecule Markers: Innovative methods for labeling of macromolecules. Novel compositions of matter. Methods of fabrication of multicolor probes that could be used for marking and detection of specific pathological cells. Pushing the envelope of optical sensing to the limits of detection, resolution, and identification.

•Low Coherence Sensing at the Nanoscale: Low coherence enhanced backscattering (LEBS). N-dimensional elastic light scattering. Angle-resolved low coherence interferometry for early cancer detection (dysplasia).

Neurophotonics: Studies of photon activation of neurons at the interface of nanomaterials attached to cells. Development and application of biocompatible photonic tools such as parallel interfaces and interconnects for communicating and control of neural networks.

•Micro- & Nano-photonics: Development and application of novel nanoparticle fluorescent quantum-dots. Sensitive, multiplexed, high-throughput characterization of macromolecular properties of cells. Nanomaterials and nanodevices for biomedicine.

Optogenetics: Novel research in employing light-activated channels and enzymes for manipulation of neural activity with temporal precision.  Utilizing nanophotonics, nanofibers, and genetic techniques for mapping and studying in real-time physiological processes in organs such as the brain and heart.

 

 

NSF Biomedical Engineering (PD 16-5345)

Due October 20 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=501023

The goal of the Biomedical Engineering (BME) program is to provide research opportunities to develop novel ideas into discovery-level and transformative projects that integrate engineering and life sciences in solving biomedical problems that serve humanity in the long-term.  BME projects must be at the interface of engineering and life sciences, and advance both engineering and life sciences.  The projects should focus on high impact transformative methods and technologies. Projects should include methods, models and enabling tools of understanding and controlling living systems; fundamental improvements in deriving information from cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems; new approaches to the design of structures and materials for eventual medical use in the long-term; and novel methods for reducing health care costs through new technologies.

The long-term impact of the projects can be related to fundamental understanding of cell and tissue function, effective disease diagnosis and/or treatment, improved health care delivery, or product development. The BME program does not support clinical studies, or proposals having as their central theme drug design and delivery or the development of biomedical devices that do not include a living biological component.  Furthermore, although research on biomaterials or  cellular biomechanics may constitute a part of the proposed studies, such research cannot be the central theme or key focus area of the proposed work.

 

 

NSF Combustion and Fire Systems (PD 18-1407)

Proposals accepted anytime

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505474

The goal of the Combustion and Fire Systems program is to generate cleaner global and local environments, enhance public safety, improve energy and homeland security, and enable more efficient energy conversion and manufacturing.

The program endeavors to create fundamental scientific knowledge and engineering solutions that are needed to develop useful combustion applications and for mitigating the effects of fire. The program aims to identify and understand the controlling basic principles and use that knowledge to create predictive capabilities for designing and optimizing practical combustion devices. Additional outcomes of interest for this program include: broad-based tools – experimental, theoretical, and computational – which can be applied to a variety of problems in combustion and fire systems; science and technology for clean and efficient generation of power, both stationary and mobile; combustion science and technology for energy-efficient manufacturing; research that enables clean global and local environments (reduction in combustion generated pollutants); enhanced public safety and homeland security through research on fire growth, inhibition and suppression; and education and training of an innovative workforce for power, transportation, and manufacturing industries.

Research areas of interest for this program include:

--Basic Combustion Science: Laminar and turbulent combustion of gas, liquid, and solid fuels in premixed, non-premixed, partially premixed, and homogeneous modes over a broad range of temperatures, pressures and length scales; burning of novel and synthetic fuels; development of predictive models and diagnostic tools.

--Combustion Science Related to Clean Energy: Increasing efficiency and reducing pollution; production and use of renewable fuels; biomass combustion, gasification, and fast pyrolysis; technologies such as oxy-fuel combustion and chemical looping combustion for carbon capture.

--Fire Prevention: Improved understanding of fires to prevent their spread, inhibit their growth, and suppress them.

 

 

NSF Nano-Biosensing (PD 17-7909)

Due October 20 annually

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505340

The Nano-Biosensing program is part of the Engineering Biology and Health cluster, which includes also 1) Cellular and Biochemical Engineering; 2) Engineering of Biomedical Systems; 3) Biophotonics; and 4) Disability and Rehabilitation Engineering.

The Nano-Biosensing program supports fundamental engineering research on devices and methods for measurement and quantification of biological analytes. Proposals that incorporate emerging nanotechnology methods are especially encouraged. Areas of interest include:

•Multi-purpose sensor platforms that exceed the performance of current state-of-the-art devices.

•Novel transduction principles, mechanisms and sensor designs suitable for measurement in practical matrix and sample-preparation-free approaches. These include error-free detection of pathogens and toxins in food matrices, waterborne pathogens, parasites, toxins, biomarkers in body fluids, and others that improve human condition.

•Nano-biosensors that enable measurement of biomolecular interactions in their native states, transmembrane transport, intracellular transport and reactions, and other biological phenomena.

•Studies that examine intracellular measurements must include discussion on the significance of the measurement.

Proposals should clearly identify the proposed problem to be solved, describe why the proposed approach is superior to current available methods, and articulate the benefit of solving the identified problem for the society at large. Sensor designs that yield reliable measurements are encouraged.  While sensitivity is important, it cannot be at the expense of reproducibility. Every application must include research strategies for addressing reproducibility of measurement and sensor response, as well as approaches that reduce errors.  The program does not support applications with incremental improvements of existing approaches and technologies.  Projects that do not include experimental characterization of sensor responses to biological analytes are discouraged, and may be returned without a review. Studies on surface functionalization and immobilization of bio-recognition molecules, and/or orientation of them are not encouraged.  Research that is focused on new recognition chemistry is also discouraged.

 

 

NSF Process Separations (PD 17-1417)

Due October 20 annually

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=13363

The Process Separations program is part of the Chemical Process Systems cluster, which includes also 1) Catalysis; 2) Process Systems, Reaction Engineering, and Molecular Thermodynamics; and 3) Energy for Sustainability.

The Process Separations program supports research focused on novel methods and materials for separation processes, such as those central to the chemical, biochemical, bioprocessing, materials, energy, and pharmaceutical industries.  A fundamental understanding of the interfacial, transport, and thermodynamic behavior of multiphase chemical systems as well as quantitative descriptions of processing characteristics in the process-oriented industries is critical for efficient resource management and effective environmental protection.  The program encourages proposals that address long standing challenges and emerging research areas and technologies, have a high degree of interdisciplinary work coupled with the generation of fundamental knowledge, and the integration of education and research.

Research topics of particular interest include fundamental molecular-level work on:

•Design of scalable mass separating agents and/or a mechanistic understanding of the interfacial thermodynamics and transport phenomena that relate to purification of gases, chemicals, or water

•Design or improvement of mass separation agents or processes that are based upon, and advance, transport principles

•Downstream purification of biologically derived chemicals for increased throughput

•Field (flow, magnetic, electrical) induced separations and other innovative approaches that address a significant reduction in energy and/or materials requirements in the process industries

 

 

NSF: Nano-Bio Phenomena and Processes in the Environment (PD 15-1179)

Proposals will be accepted October 1-20, 2015, and October 1-20 annually after that.

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=501030&WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

This program formerly was known as Environmental Health and Safety of Nanotechnology (nanoEHS). The goal of the Nano-Bio Phenomena and Processes in the Environment (NPPE) program is to support research to further fundamental and quantitative understanding of the interactions of biological and ecological media with nanostructured materials and nanosystems, which include one- to three-dimensional nanostructured materials and heterogeneous nano-bio hybrid assemblies. Such nanostructured materials and systems frequently exhibit novel physical, chemical and biological behavior in living systems and ecological matrices as compared to the bulk scale. This program supports research that explores the interaction of nanoscale materials and systems with both macro and nano-scale systems in biological and environmental media, as well as remediation solutions.

 

 

NSF/DOE Partnership in Basic Plasma Science and Engineering (16-564)

Due October 21, 2016, and the third Friday in October annually after that.

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2016/nsf16564/nsf16564.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click.

The goal of the initiative is to enhance basic plasma research and education in this broad, multidisciplinary field by coordinating efforts and combining resources of the two agencies. The current solicitation also encourages submission of proposals to perform basic plasma experiments at NSF and DOE supported user facilities, such as the Basic Plasma Science Facility at the University of California, Los Angeles and facilities located at DOE national laboratories, designed to serve the needs of the broader plasma community.

Some of the general research areas which are included are:

•Chaos, Turbulence and Self-Organization in Plasmas

•Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems in Plasmas

•Dusty Plasmas

•Non-neutral Plasmas

•Flows and Magnetic Fields in Plasmas, their Interaction and Interpenetration

•Intense Field Matter Interactions in Plasmas

•Advanced Methods for Plasma Modeling and Simulation

•Plasma Diagnostics

•Control of Plasma Processes

•Study of Plasma Reactors for Chemical Production

•Plasma Surface Interactions, Plasma Modification, Synthesis and Processing of Materials

•Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas, Microplasmas, and Plasmas in Environmental Science and Technology

•Astrophysical and Solar Plasmas, Plasmas in Interplanetary Space, Earth and Other Planetary Magnetospheres and Atmospheres

Although the above list is intended to be illustrative, it directly reflects the interests and responsibilities of the NSF Divisions participating in the initiative and the goals of the DOE SC/FES.

 

 

NSF Thermal Transport Processes (PD-17-1406)

Due October 20 annually

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505328&WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

The Thermal Transport Processes program is part of the Transport Phenomena cluster, which includes also 1) Combustion and Fire Systems; 2) Fluid Dynamics; and 3) Particulate and Multiphase Processes.

The Thermal Transport Processes (TTP) program supports engineering research projects that lay the foundation for new discoveries in thermal transport phenomena. These projects should either develop new fundamental knowledge or combine existing knowledge in thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat and mass transfer to probe new areas of innovation. The program seeks transformative projects with the potential for improving our basic understanding, predictability and application of thermal transport processes. Projects should articulate the contribution(s) to the fundamental knowledge supporting thermal transport processes and state clearly the potential application(s) impact when appropriate. Projects that combine analytical, experimental and numerical efforts, geared toward understanding, modeling and predicting thermal phenomena, are of great interest. Collaborative and interdisciplinary proposals for which the main contribution is in thermal transport processes fundamentals are also encouraged.

 

 

NSF Environmental Sustainability (17-7643)

Due October 20 annually

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505338

The Environmental Sustainability program is part of the Environmental Engineering and Sustainability cluster, which includes also 1) Environmental Engineering; and 2) Biological and Environmental Interactions of Nanoscale Materials.

The goal of the Environmental Sustainability program is to promote sustainable engineered systems that support human well-being and that are also compatible with sustaining natural (environmental) systems. These systems provide ecological services vital for human survival. Research efforts supported by the program typically consider long time horizons and may incorporate contributions from the social sciences and ethics. The program supports engineering research that seeks to balance society's need to provide ecological protection and maintain stable economic conditions.

There are four principal general research areas that are supported:

•Industrial Ecology: Topics of interest in Industrial Ecology include advancements in modeling such as life cycle assessment, materials flow analysis, input/output economic models, and novel metrics for measuring sustainable systems. Innovations in industrial ecology are encouraged.

•Green Engineering: Research is encouraged to advance the sustainability of manufacturing processes, green buildings, and infrastructure. Many programs in the Engineering Directorate support research in environmentally benign manufacturing or chemical processes. The Environmental Sustainability program supports research that would affect more than one chemical or manufacturing process or that takes a systems or holistic approach to green engineering for infrastructure or green buildings. Improvements in distribution and collection systems that will advance smart growth strategies and ameliorate effects of growth are research areas that are supported by Environmental Sustainability. Innovations in management of storm water, recycling and reuse of drinking water, and other green engineering techniques to support sustainability may also be fruitful areas for research. NOTE: Water treatment proposals are to be submitted to the CBET Environmental Engineering program (1440), NOT the Environmental Sustainability program (7643).

•Ecological Engineering: Topics should focus on the engineering aspects of restoring ecological function to natural systems. Engineering research in the enhancement of natural capital to foster sustainable development is encouraged.

•Earth Systems Engineering: Earth systems engineering considers aspects of large scale engineering research that involve mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions, adaptation to climate change, and other global scale concerns.

All proposed research should be driven by engineering principles, and be presented explicitly in an environmental sustainability context. Proposals should include involvement in engineering research of at least one graduate student, as well as undergraduates. Incorporation of aspects of social, behavioral, and economic sciences is welcomed. Innovative proposals outside the scope of the four core areas mentioned above may be considered. However, prior to submission, it is recommended that the PI contact the Program Director to avoid the possibility of the proposal being returned without review. For proposals that call for research to be done outside of the United States, an explanation must be presented of the potential benefit of the research for the United States.

 

 

NSF: Environmental Engineering (PD 17-1440)

Due October 20 annually

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505332

The Environmental Engineering program is part of the Environmental Engineering and Sustainability cluster, which includes also 1) Environmental Sustainability; and 2) Biological and Environmental Interactions of Nanoscale Materials.

The goal of the Environmental Engineering program is to support transformative research which applies scientific and engineering principles to avoid or minimize solid, liquid, and gaseous discharges, resulting from human activities on land, inland and coastal waters, and air, while promoting resource and energy conservation and recovery. The program also fosters cutting-edge scientific research for identifying, evaluating, and monitoring the waste assimilative capacity of the natural environment and for removing or reducing contaminants from polluted air, water, and soils. Any proposal investigating sensors, materials or devices that does not integrate these products with an environmental engineering activity or area of research may be returned without review.

Major areas of interest include:

•Enhancing the availability of high quality water supplies: Development of innovative biological, chemical and physical treatment processes to meet the growing demand for water; investigation of processes that remove and degrade contaminants, remediate contaminated soil and groundwater, and convert wastewaters into water suitable for reuse; investigation of environmental engineering aspects of urban watersheds, reservoirs, estuaries and storm water management; investigation of biogeochemical and transport processes driving water quality in the aquatic and subsurface environment. (Please note that water treatment research targeting chemical or physical separation processes (e.g. membranes) should be submitted to the Process Separations Program, CBET 1417).

•Fate and transport of contaminants of emerging concern in air, water, solid waste, and soils: Investigate the fate, transport, and remediation of potentially harmful contaminants and their by-products. (Please note that research concerning nanomaterials should be submitted to Biological and Environmental Interactions of Nanoscale Materials, CBET 1179).

The duration of unsolicited awards is generally one to three years. The typical annual award size for the program is around $110,000 per year. Principal Investigators requesting a higher amount must consult with the Program Director prior to the submission of a proposal, to avoid the possibility of the proposal being returned without review.

 

 

NSF/SRC/IARPA: Semiconductor Synthetic Biology for Information Processing and Storage Technologies (SemiSynBio) (NSF 17-557)

Due October 30, 2017

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17557/nsf17557.htm

The National Science Foundation, Semiconductor Research Corporation, and Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Agency have jointly released NSF Program Solicitation 17-557, Semiconductor Synthetic Biology for Information Processing and Storage Technologies (SemiSynBio). This program will make an estimated 10 awards at up to $500,000 per year each for up to three years to foster exploratory, multi-disciplinary, longer-term basic research leading to novel high-payoff solutions for the information technology industry based on recent progress in synthetic biology and the know-how of semiconductor technology. It is also anticipated that research in synthetic biology will benefit by leveraging semiconductor capabilities in design and fabrication of hybrid and complex material systems for extensive applications in biological and information processing technologies. In addition, the educational goal is to train new cadre of students and researchers.

Proposals should be interdisciplinary. A proposal must address at least three of these topics:

1. Advancing basic and fundamental research by exploring new programmable models of computation, communication, and memory based on synthetic biology.

2. Enriching the knowledge base and addressing foundational questions at the interface of biology and semiconductors.

3. Promoting the frontier of research in the design of new bio-nano hybrid devices based on sustainable materials, including carbon-based systems that test the physical size limit in transient electronics.

4. Designing and fabricating hybrid semiconductor-biological microelectronic systems based on living cells for next-generation information processing functionalities.

5. Integrating scaling-up and manufacturing technologies involving electronic and synthetic biology characterization instruments with CAD-like software tools.

An individual may be a key person in only one proposal.

 

 

BRAIN Initiative: Foundations of Non-Invasive Functional Human Brain Imaging and Recording - Bridging Scales and Modalities (R01) (RFA-MH-17-235)

Letter of intent due October 23, 2016. Proposals due November 23, 2016, and October 17, 2017

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-MH-17-235.html

This funding opportunity announcement (FOA), in support of the NIH Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative®, aims to support transformative discoveries that will lead to breakthroughs in understanding human brain function. Guided by the long-term scientific plan, “BRAIN 2025: A Scientific Vision,” this FOA specifically seeks to support efforts that will revolutionize our understanding of the biological activity underlying, and bioinformatic content of, data collected using contemporary non-invasive functional brain imaging techniques. The hope is that these transformative discoveries will lead to breakthroughs in understanding the dynamic activity of the human brain.  

This FOA is related to the Recommendations in Section III.2 and 6 of the Final Report (http://www.nih.gov/science/brain/2025/index.htm) of the BRAIN working group. Specifically, this FOA solicits applications that will address the recommendations on “Maps at Multiple Scales” and “Advancing Human Neuroscience” (Section III, Part 2 and 6) from “Section III> Implementation: Goals, Deliverables, Timelines and Costs” of the Final Report.

Transformative approaches are needed that will enable the testing and validation of estimation of anatomy and physiology across scales of time and space. These approaches could include: (a) combining current and emerging neural recording and neuromodulation techniques and methods (leveraging theoretical models, simulations, and sophisticated quantitative analyses) to deconstruct signals from non-invasive neuroimaging and neurophysiological recording; (b) using both correlations and perturbations of micro- or meso-level activity to determine relationships with macro-level activity to reveal and define the principles by which signals decay or amplify across scales; and (c) innovative design of critical experiments to validate and test emerging theories and ideas.

Examples of potential studies responsive to this FOA include:

•Applications that significantly advance our understanding of the structure-function relationship of defined units in the brain using non-invasive imaging and functional evaluation techniques, high-density recording, and behavioral manipulations. Studies may include investigations aimed at understanding how recorded signals map onto neural code in the context of specific behaviors.

•Integrative, multimodal approaches combining non-invasive brain stimulation and neuromodulation techniques with functional neuroimaging (e.g. simultaneous transcranial magnetic stimulation and fMRI, focused ultrasound and other neuroimaging and recording techniques) to elucidate functional networks through focal stimulation of cortical brain regions and monitoring of the distributed signals.

•Manipulation of subcortical activity through neurons and circuits deep within the brain, and subsequent imaging of downstream effects on cortical dynamics or circuit function.

•Use of integrated multimodal imaging approaches across structural levels to link neural circuit dynamics (e.g., oscillations) to structural or functional measurements in subcortical structures, and those to observations in the cortex.

 

NIH: New Concepts and Early - Stage Research for Large - Scale Recording and Modulation in the Nervous System (R21) (RFA-EY-17-002)

Due October 26, 2017

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-EY-17-002.html

This program will make exploratory R21 awards (up to $275,000 of direct costs over up to two years) for accelerated development of new large-scale recording technologies and tools for neural circuit manipulation. These new technologies and approaches will provide unprecedented opportunities for exploring how the nervous system encodes, processes, utilizes, stores, and retrieves vast quantities of information. A better understanding of this dynamic neural activity will enable researchers to seek new ways to diagnose, treat, and prevent brain disorders.

A central goal of the BRAIN Initiative is to understand how electrical and chemical signals code information in neural circuits and give rise to sensations, thoughts, emotions and actions. While currently available technologies can provide some understanding, they may not be sufficient to accomplish this goal. For example, non-invasive technologies are low resolution and/or provide indirect measures such as blood flow, which are imprecise; invasive technologies can provide information at the level of single neurons producing the fundamental biophysical signals, but they can only be applied to tens or hundreds of neurons, out of a total number in the human brain estimated at 85 billion.

Other BRAIN FOAs seek to develop novel technology (RFA-NS-17-003) or to optimize existing technology ready for in-vivo proof-of-concept testing and collection of preliminary data (RFA-NS-17-004) for recording or manipulating neural activity on a scale that is beyond what is currently possible. This FOA seeks applications for unique and innovative technologies that are in an even earlier stage of development than that sought in other FOAs, including new and untested ideas that are in the initial stages of conceptualization.

 

Naval Engineering Education Consortium 2017 (N00174-17-0001)

Due October 31, 2017

http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=296758

The Naval Surface Warfare Centers have released the 2017 solicitation for the Naval Engineering Education Consortium. NEEC supports research projects that provide training opportunities to U.S. undergraduates. NSWC Corona does not have any topics in the solicitation this year. Here are the topics:

Naval Surface Warfare Center Crane Division (CR)

CR1: Sensor Fusion: Currently, Radar and Electro-Optic sensors

CR2: Machine Learning Systems for Wireless Cyber Environments

Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (DD)

DD1: Research on emerging software development

DD2: Reserved.

DD3: Research and Development of laser propagation, energy density, manufacturing, control, beam forming, and related topics to lasers as weapons in a marine environment

DD4: Research on analysis of mission engineering for emerging weapon systems

DD5: Modeling and simulation research and development

DD6: Research on Radar unitization in a marine environment

DD7: Railgun developmental research

DD8: Innovation for Big Data analysis tool development

DD9: Artificial intelligence/autonomy research and development

Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division (PC)

PC1. Communications and Processing for Mobile Distributed Sensor and Weapon Networks

PC2. Multi-vehicle Autonomy, Sensing, and Collaboration

Naval Undersea Warfare Center Keyport Division (KPT)

KPT1: Cyber and Cyber-Warfare Research and Development

KPT2: Innovative concepts and development for robotics for Navy Shipyard applications

 

 

 

NIFA Food and Agricultural Sciences National Needs Graduate and Postgraduate Fellowship Grants Program (USDA-NIFA-HEP-006390)

Due October 31, 2017

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=297013

The purpose of the NNF Grants Program is to provide funding to support students’ training and completion of master’s and/or doctoral degree programs in identified national need areas within the Food, Agricultural, Natural Resources, and Human Sciences (FANRHS). Awards made under NNF are specifically intended to support traineeship programs that engage outstanding students to pursue and complete their degrees in areas where there is a national need for the development of scientific and professional expertise in the food and agricultural sciences.

The proposer is the institution, not the student. The institution sets eligibility requirements and selects the recipients.

Specific areas of interest are:

(a) Animal Production

(b) Plant Production

(c) Forest Resources

(d) Agricultural Education and Communication

(e) Agricultural Management and Economics

(f) Food Science, Human Nutrition and Human Sciences

(g) Agricultural Biosecurity

(h) Integrative Biosciences for Sustainable Food and Agricultural Systems – (integrative training in food and agricultural, social and economic disciplines).

There is no limit to the number of applications an eligible institution may submit; however, an institution may only receive support up to a maximum of $525,000 in awards. This support may be provided through multiple grant awards.

 

 

Higher Education Multicultural Scholars Program (MSP) (USDA-NIFA-HEMS-006391)

Due October 31, 2017

https://nifa.usda.gov/funding-opportunity/higher-education-multicultural-scholars-program-msp?utm_content=&utm_medium=email&utm_name=&utm_source=govdelivery&utm_term= or https://nifa.usda.gov/sites/default/files/rfa/17-Higher-Edu-27.pdf

This program provides scholarships for conduct undergraduate and Doctors of Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M.) students. The scholarships are intended to encourage outstanding students from groups that are historically underrepresented and underserved to pursue and complete baccalaureate degrees in the Food, Agricultural, Natural Resources, and Human Sciences, or achieve a D.V.M., that would lead to a diverse and highly skilled work force.

Applicants should propose training projects at the undergraduate and/or D.V.M. levels to support scholarships and/or special experiential learning (SEL) opportunities in the following program areas of emphasis (AEs):

(1) Veterinary Medicine (First Professional Degree in Veterinary Medicine, i.e. D.V.M.)

(2) Agricultural Sciences and Engineering

(3) Natural Resource Sciences Training

(4) Human Sciences Training

(5) Food Science and Human Nutrition Training

(6) Agrosecurity Science Training

(7) Agricultural Education

Each application may request any combination of D.V.M. and/or undergraduate degree level scholarships. There is no limit to the number of applications an institution may submit. NIFA reserves the right to fund fewer Scholars than requested in an application.

1. Regular Grant No. 1 – Single Institution Application - An eligible applicant can request $6,500 in scholarship support per Scholar per year for up to four (4) years. In addition, the applicant may request $2,500 per Scholar per year for up to four years as a cost-of-education institutional allowance (in lieu of indirect costs). Each applicant may request NIFA/USDA funding for a minimum of $108,000 for scholarship support for a cohort of students. A cohort of students can be comprised of any combination of two-year, three-year, or four-year appointments. All scholars in the cohort must be appointed within 12 months of the award start date. The appointments must conform to the MSP eligibility requirements (Part I, C, a, (1)). For this project type, $4,000 may be requested in SEL support, for TO-BE-RECRUITED USDA MSP Scholars (See Part II C. 3.). A single application may propose D.V.M. and/or baccalaureate level training that addresses any of the seven (7) Program Areas of Emphasis – singly or in combination, up to a maximum of $200,000 per application in Award Category No. 1.

2. Regular Grant No. 2 – Student Experiential Learning (SEL) – One-time $4,000 for each eligible USDA MSP Scholar that may be used for approved activities (Part I, C, b, (1)), over the active period of the award. Funds requested in this category may not exceed $20,000. This support may be provided through multiple grant awards.

 

 

November

 

 

NSF: Division of Materials Research: Topical Materials Research Programs (DMR-TMRP) (17-580)

Due November 1 annually

https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf17580

The National Science Foundation has released a new program solicitation, 17-580, to replace six standing program descriptions (PDs). The new solicitation is Division of Materials Research: Topical Materials Research Programs (DMR-TMRP). It replaces the PDs for Biomaterials, Condensed Matter Physics, Electronic and Photonic Materials, Metals and Metallic Nanostructures, Polymers, and Solid-State and Materials Chemistry.

NSF expects to make 225 awards of varying sizes from a $55 million pool under this solicitation.

Through this solicitation, investigators may submit only one proposal across DMR to any of the Topical Materials Research Programs as PI or co-PI during the annual proposal acceptance window. This includes proposals under GOALI, RUI/ROA, and binational collaborative research programs. Proposals for EAGER, RAPID, RAISE, and conferences, as well as supplements to existing grants, are not subject to this limitation and may be submitted anytime after consultation with and approval from the cognizant Program Officer.

Administratively, there is one highly unusual requirement in the current and pending section of the proposal: For each current award or pending proposal listed, investigators are requested to include one or more sentences addressing the relationship of the present proposal to their currently funded projects or pending proposals and explaining how the work proposed under this solicitation is distinct.

 

 

NSF Energy, Power, and Control Networks (PD 16-7607)

Due November 1 annually beginning 2016

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505249

REU and RET supplements due April 3, 2017, and April 1 annually after that

Recent advances in communications, computation, and sensing technologies offer unprecedented opportunities for the design of cyber-physical systems with increased responsiveness, interconnectivity and automation. To meet new challenges and societal needs, the Energy, Power, Control and Networks (EPCN) Program invests in systems and control methods for analysis and design of cyber-physical systems to ensure stability, performance, robustness, and security. Topics of interest include modeling, optimization, learning, and control of networked multi-agent systems, higher-level decision making, and dynamic resource allocation as well as risk management in the presence of uncertainty, sub-system failures and stochastic disturbances. EPCN also invests in adaptive dynamic programing, brain-like networked architectures performing real-time learning, and neuromorphic engineering. EPCN supports innovative proposals dealing with systems research in such areas as energy, transportation, and nanotechnology. EPCN places emphasis on electric power systems, including generation, transmission, storage, and integration of renewables; power electronics and drives; battery management systems; hybrid and electric vehicles; and understanding of the interplay of power systems with associated regulatory and economic structures and with consumer behavior. Also of interest are interdependencies of power and energy systems with other critical infrastructures.

 

 

NSF Electronics, Photonics, and Magnetic Devices (PD-16-1517)

Due November 1 annually beginning 2016

REU and RET supplements due April 3, 2017, and April 1 annually after that

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505250&WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

EPMD seeks to improve the fundamental understanding of devices and components based on the principles of micro- and nano-electronics, optics and photonics, optoelectronics, magnetics, electromechanics, electromagnetics, and related physical phenomena. The Electronics & Magnetic Devices component of EPMD enables discovery and innovation advancing the frontiers of nanoelectronics, spin electronics, molecular and organic electronics, bioelectronics, biomagnetics, non-silicon electronics, and flexible electronics. It also addresses advances in energy-efficient electronics, sensors, low-noise, power electronics, and mixed signal devices. The Optic & Photonic Devices component of EPMD supports research and engineering efforts leading to significant advances in novel optical sources and photodetectors, optical communication devices, photonic integrated circuits, single-photon quantum devices, and nanophotonics. It also addresses novel optical imaging and sensing applications and solar cell photovoltaics.

 

 

NSF Communications, Circuits, and Sensing-Systems  (CCSS) (PD 16-7564)

Due November 1 annually beginning 2016

REU and RET supplements due April 3, 2017, and April 1 annually after that

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505248&WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

This comes from the Electrical, Communications, and Cyber Systems Division, but it involves many cyber-physical areas.

CCSS is intended to spur visionary systems-oriented activities in collaborative, multidisciplinary, and integrative engineering research. CCSS supports systems research in hardware, signal processing techniques, and architectures to enable the next generation of cyber-physical systems (CPS) that leverage computation, communication, and algorithms integrated with physical domains. CCSS supports innovative research and integrated educational activities in micro- and nano- electromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS), communications and sensing systems, and cyber-physical systems. The goal is to design, develop, and implement new complex and hybrid systems at all scales, including nano and macro, that lead to innovative engineering principles and solutions for a variety of application domains including, but not limited to, healthcare, medicine, environmental and biological monitoring, communications, disaster mitigation, homeland security, intelligent transportation, manufacturing, energy, and smart buildings. CCSS also supports integration technologies at both intra- and inter- chip levels, new and advanced radio frequency (RF), millimeter wave and optical wireless and hybrid communications systems architectures, and sensing and imaging at terahertz (THz) frequencies.

Proposals for the CCSS program may involve collaborative research to capture the breadth of expertise needed for such multidisciplinary integrative activities. ECCS will consider supporting a limited number of small team proposals of three or more Investigators from different disciplines and/or universities.

 

 

NSF: CISE Research Infrastructure (CRI) (17-581)

Pre-proposals are required, and there should be no substantive changes between the pre-proposal and the full proposal.  Pre-proposals are due November 02, 2017,     November 07, 2018, and the first Wednesday in November annually after that. Full proposals will be due January 11, 2018, January 10, 2019, and the second Thursday in January annually after that.

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17581/nsf17581.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

The CRI program supports two classes of awards:

-- Institutional Infrastructure (II) awards support the creation of new (II-NEW) CISE research infrastructure or the enhancement (II-EN) of existing CISE research infrastructure to enable world-class CISE research opportunities at the awardee and collaborating institutions. The proposed research infrastructure must enable compelling new research opportunities for the proposing PI or team of PIs and associated students and collaborators (i.e., for individuals at the awardee and collaborating institutions). II proposals involving multiple investigators from one or more departments and/or institutions are welcome. Projects must include substantial involvement of CISE researchers and enable projects with a clear research focus related to the core CISE disciplines. The majority of the II awards will be made in the $200,000 - $750,000 range, though a small number of II awards may be made in the $750,000 - $1,000,000 range.

-- Community Infrastructure (CI) awards support four types of projects: planning, new, enhancement, and sustainment to enable world-class CISE research opportunities for broad-based communities of CISE researchers that extend well beyond the awardee institutions. Each CI award may support the operation of such infrastructure, ensuring that the awardee institution(s) is (are) well positioned to provide a high quality of service to CISE community researchers expected to use the infrastructure to realize their research goals. The majority of the CI awards will be made in the $500,000 - $1,000,000 range, though a very small number of CI awards may be made in the $1,000,000 - $2,000,000 range. The majority of the Community Infrastructure Planning (CI-P) awards will be made in the $50,000 - $100,000 range.

     •CI Planning (CI-P): Will fund grants of up to $100,000 for durations of up to 1.5 years to prepare for the submission of a CI-NEW or CI-EN proposal.

     •CI New (CI-NEW): Will fund grants of up to $2 million for durations of up to 3 years to create new CISE research infrastructure (NSF will provide no more than $250,000 per year for operating the infrastructure).

     •CI Enhancement (CI-EN): Will fund grants of up to $2 million for durations of up to 3 years to enhance existing CISE research infrastructure (NSF will provide no more than $250,000 per year for operating the infrastructure).

     •CI Sustainability (CI-SUSTAIN): Will fund grants of up to $1 million for durations of up to 3 years to provide, for an existing infrastructure that is of value to the community, resources for (a) continued operation and (b) the implementation of a credible plan for achieving community sustainability at the end of the 3 years of funding (NSF will provide no more than $250,000 per year for operating the infrastructure). Projects that have received prior CI-EN awards (or legacy awards such as CI-ADDO-EN) must use this route for continued CRI funding. Resources that receive a CI-SUSTAIN award are not eligible for any future funding from the CRI program.

A university or organization may submit no more than three Institutional Infrastructure (II) proposals per competition. There is no limit on Community Infrastructure (CI) proposals per competition. An individual investigator may be involved in no more than two CRI proposals per year. I will touch base with RED on whether we need to do a formal limited submission process for this.

 

 

Army: Power and Energy Soldiers for Soldier, Mobile, and Tactical Grid Applications (W56KGU-15-R-0032)

Open to November 3, 2020

https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity&mode=form&tab=core&id=b0369c44a7416b0fe8041cae9414faa3

The U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center invites concept papers (up to 10 pages) for new ideas in energy generation, distribution, and storage in the field. The Army will accept ideas under this program until November 3, 2020; it will invite full proposals if it likes your concept.

Note that this program is aimed at making contracts rather than grants. The orientation is more toward testing and delivery than on research as we typically think of it. Also, we will want to be sure that the Army understands that we can’t engage in classified or export-controlled work. These are matters that we can address in a concept paper and before we submit a full proposal.

Here are the topic areas:

Research Interest:  Electrochemical Based Portable Power Source

1.  Rechargeable Batteries

2. Primary (Disposable) Batteries

3.  Ultracapacitors

Research Interest:  Fuel Based Portable Power Sources

1.  Fuel Cell Technologies

2.  Advanced Power Systems (250 W to 100 kW)

3.  Advanced Materials for Power Systems Performance

4.  Data Acquisition Systems

5.  Power Assessment with Software

6.  Modeling/Simulation and Assessment of Advanced Power Sources for Tactical Fields

7.  Survey of Stationary and Mobile Power Systems, Alternative Energy and Environmental Control Units (ECU)

8.  Advanced Energy Storage Batteries for Grid Configuration

9.  Co-Generation ECU

10.  Small Lightweight External Combustion Power Sources (250W - 3 kW)

11.  50-200 W Thermoelectric Power Source Demonstrator

12.  150 - 500 W Thermoelectric Generator Demonstrator

13.  Advanced Power Electronics/Power Management

Research Interest:  Power & Energy Systems including Alternative Energy Power Sources

1. Hybrid Power Systems

2. Renewable Energy Sources

3. Battery Chargers

4. Power Management/Smart Grid

5. Soldier Worn Fueled Systems

 

 

NIH: Research on the Mechanisms and/or Behavioral Outcomes of Multisensory Processing (PA-15-347)

Due March 5, July 5, and November 5 annually to November 2018

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-13-302.html

Several components of the National Institutes of Health have released PA-15-347, Research on the Mechanisms and/or Behavioral Outcomes of Multisensory Processing. Honestly, I don’t know whether this fits with anyone in BCOE. The program will support animal and human studies to elucidate the mechanisms and behavioral outcomes of sensory inputs.

Only certain institutes/centers in NIH are involved, and only the following research areas are of interest:

The National Institute on Aging (NIA) supports multisensory research in the context of aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases, in particular Alzheimer's disease (AD).  Topics of interest include, but are not restricted to: 1) mechanistic studies to understand changes in multisensory processing in aging or disease; 2) the interplay between multisensory processing and motor, cognitive, or affective function in aging or disease; 3) the impact of multisensory processing on daily functioning (e.g. walking, reaching, grasping, eating, swallowing, and other basic movements) , lifestyle activities (e.g. exercises, navigation, driving, dancing, art activities),  and social interactions in older adults with or without neurodegenerative diseases; 4) assessments of multisensory function as potential early detections of AD or other age-related neurodegenerative diseases; and 5) strategies or therapies to improve multisensory processing and related behaviors in aging or disease.  NIA will support both human and animal model (including invertebrate model) studies.

The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) is interested in studies that would elucidate mechanisms by which complementary or integrative approaches alter pain processing.  Subjects of interest include, but are not limited to, multisensory pain modulation associated with natural products and mind and body practices   Approaches are limited to those with documented effectiveness or currently being used in pain management.  For the purposes of this FOA, NCCIH will support basic and mechanistic research in both human and animal models but will not support efficacy/effectiveness clinical trials.

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) supports multisensory research in the context of cancer and cancer control. Topics of interest include, but are not restricted to: 1) Studies of multisensory interactions with taste that might govern healthy vs unhealthy eating, drinking, or smoking; 2) disruption of multisensory perception by cancer and cancer treatments; 3) the potential for using multisensory interactions to enhance health communications; 4) multisensory control of attention, as might be relevant in complex oncology or cancer care settings; 5) circadian and sleep-dependent influences on multisensory interactions.  NCI will support both human and animal model studies.

The National Eye Institute (NEI) supports research that addresses blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and requirements of the blind. Under this PA, NEI will accept applications investigating multisensory interaction (vision combined with additional sensory input) when the research would inform fundamental mechanisms of visual function or disease/disorder mechanisms related to loss of vision. Topics of interest include, but are not restricted to, the impact of other senses on visual perception, the impact of multisensory input on sensory substitution in the visually impaired, and multisensory strategies in low vision rehabilitation.

The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute on Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) is particularly interested in applications pertaining to rehabilitation and child development. Specifically, the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research is interested in research including but not limited to the following: to elucidate changes in the processing of sensory information including visual, auditory, mechanical (touch, pain, temperature) processes after traumatic brain injury, both in the acute stages of injury and at more chronic time points; persistent abnormalities in sensory processing that may affect cognitive processes known to be at risk after traumatic brain injury such as working memory, reading, attention, anger, sleep; changes in sensory perception after stroke that accompany common chronic conditions such as aphasia, spatial neglect, or loss of motor function; factors that lead to  “sensory stroke” or lacunar infarction, and unique approaches to rehabilitation; multisensory processing (vision, proprioception, tactile, etc.) related to the integration of prosthetic devices for functional use by people with amputations; the role of multisensory processing in autonomic dysreflexia and bowel and bladder voiding impairments following spinal cord injury; the role of multisensory processing in pain secondary to a disabling condition such as stroke, spinal cord injury, amputation, or traumatic brain injury.  The Child Development and Behavioral Branch at NICHD is interested in the research applications pertaining to the developmental aspects of multisensory processing.  NICHD will support both human and animal model studies. 

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) encourages research on multisensory integration in the context of drug abuse and addiction in humans and animal models. Research of interest includes, but is not limited to behavioral, imaging, and mechanistic neurobiological studies of integration and encoding of multisensory cues that trigger drug craving, drug-seeking and relapse; integration of multisensory information involved in reward valuation and decision-making; top-down influences on the salience of multisensory drug-related cues; the effects of drugs of abuse on multi-sensory processing; and multisensory processing of emotional and social cues in drug users or animal models of drug abuse.

The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) mission supports research in the areas of hearing, balance, smell, taste, voice, speech and language. Multisensory integration is well known to modulate some of these functions even though specific mechanisms are not yet understood well. NIDCD encourages applications where the main goal is to clarify how neuronal mechanisms underlie multisensory modulation of function within the NIDCD mission areas, in humans or animal models, with particular interest when the modulation is in the context of disorder or disease.  As examples, in humans the sense of smell begins in the nose and is carried by olfactory pathways to the cortex, while taste begins in the oral cavity and is carried by gustatory pathways to the cortex; these two separate sensations, coming from entirely different cranial nerve systems, are integrated to form the common multisensory perception of flavor. This combined percept itself can be modified further by visual and tactile stimuli such as color and smoothness, and a disorder in any of these pathways can affect appetite, nutrition and well-being.  Similarly, our sense of balance depends on inputs from the vestibular organs of the inner ear along with substantial multisensory input from somatosensory and visual systems, and multisensory reweighting is critical for balance when disorders occur in any of the contributing senses. In hearing, auditory misperception often can be improved by vision for functions like sound source localization. NIDCD support for voice, speech and language is focused on disordered processes, but here too audio-visual interactions can be important for speech perception disorders, and language and reading impairments.

The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) encourages applications that would inform fundamental mechanisms of how sensory systems impact physiological function of the dental, oral, and craniofacial complex, and, for oral health behaviors, how different sensory modalities interact with and influence one another in determining perception. Discovery of mechanisms underlying hypersensitivity of multiple sensory systems, sometimes seen in chronic pain conditions, is of interest. In particular, studies on neuropathies of craniofacial tissues including temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) and overlapping painful disorders are a high priority. NIDCR also supports research that would further the understanding of how sensory systems impact mastication and adaptations to altered dentition and oral prostheses. NIDCR seeks to further the exploration of how cognitive expectations, memories, and affective states contribute to or modify perceptual and behavioral outcomes which includes but is not limited to inputs that influence the decision to seek dental care, stimuli that impact dental fear or dental anxiety, and psychosocial adjustment to craniofacial disorders.   Applications that propose a clinical trial or study to test an intervention are not appropriate for this FOA and should instead use the R34 mechanism under the NIDCR Clinical Trials Program (NIDCR Behavioral or Social Intervention Clinical Trial Planning Grant (R34) - See more at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-14-342.html).

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) is interested in applications that focus on mechanisms of multisensory interactions at the cellular, circuit or systems level when such research would inform fundamental knowledge of neurological function or mechanisms related to understanding, treating or reversing the burden of neurological disease.  There are mechanistic interactions among sensory systems neurology, co-morbidities across sensory systems, and implications for sensory substitution for disorders and disabilities. Under this FOA, research topics of interest to NINDS include, but are not limited to: mechanisms of sensory transduction or integration of multiple sensory modalities in the normal nervous system, alterations in multisensory mechanisms in the context of neurological diseases or conditions, or mechanisms of multisensory adaptive or maladaptive plasticity or recovery of function following disease or trauma to the brain, spinal cord or peripheral nervous system.  Primary impacts of the research should inform fundamental mechanisms or disease/disorder mechanisms within the NINDS funding mission (http://www.ninds.nih.gov/about_ninds/ninds_overview.htm).  Applicants should develop specific aims to test mechanistic hypotheses which go beyond descriptive studies of multisensory phenomena.  Applications can investigate mechanisms from sensory transduction, to modality tract tracing, to nervous system recording/imaging/manipulating, to quantitative behavioral assay (i.e., psychophysics) and must contain an in vivo component.  Applications that address technology development are not appropriate and should be submitted to the appropriate bioengineering research grant opportunity (http://www.ninds.nih.gov/research/bioengineering/).  Applications that seek to develop or test therapeutics or devices for clinical use are not appropriate and should be submitted to the appropriate translational research funding opportunity http://www.ninds.nih.gov/funding/areas/translational_research/index.htm).  Applications that propose a clinical trial or study to test an intervention are not appropriate for this FOA and should instead use the R01 mechanism under the NINDS Exploratory Clinical Trials Program (See more at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-13-281.html).

The Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) will support research of scientific interest to the participating Institutes and Centers named in this announcement.  ORWH will support applications that propose comparisons between male and female subjects on the outcome measures.  

last updated 03/13/17 SS

 

 

NIH: NLM Express Research Grants in Biomedical Informatics (R01) (PAR-16-404)

Proposals accepted March 5, July 5, and November 5 annually until July 2019

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-16-404.html

. This program supports innovative research in biomedical informatics and data science. The scope of NLM's interest in the research domain of informatics is broad and interdisciplinary, developing methods and approaches in biomedical computing, data science and related information fields for application domains of health and biomedicine, including health care delivery, basic biomedical research, clinical and translational research, precision medicine, public health, biosurveillance, health information management in disasters, and similar areas. NLM defines biomedical informatics as the science of optimal representation, organization, management, integration and presentation of information relevant to human health and biology, for purposes of learning, sharing and use.

The following basic informatics problem areas demonstrate the scope of NLM's research interests:

•Information & knowledge processing, including understanding, translation or summarization of natural language in real-time or near real-time, automated assignment of metadata

•Integration of very large data sets and/or heterogeneous data types to support discovery, learning and health care

•Advanced information retrieval, knowledge discovery in very large or heterogeneous data sets, discovery mining, and other techniques for in silico discovery and research including approaches for accelerating the linkage of phenotypic and genomic information

•Incorporation of machine intelligence into knowledge tools and resources for use by health care providers, scientists and consumers

•Models of complex data, simulations, information visualization and presentation approaches to enhance decisions, learning or understanding, particularly in large and heterogeneous data sets

•Innovative approaches for ensuring accuracy, privacy and security of clinical and biomedical research data

•Support for consumer and patient engagement in understanding, accessing, sharing, protecting and using their own health data

Last updated 03/13/17 SS

 

 

NIH: Understanding and Modifying Temporal Dynamics of Coordinated Neural Activity (R21) (PAR-17-463)

Due November 8, 2017

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-17-463.html

The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is to lay the groundwork for developing systems-level neuroscience interventions into treatments for cognitive, affective, or social deficits in psychiatric disorders. A rich body of knowledge exists regarding the systems-level coordination of temporal patterns of electrophysiological activity in the brain. One key principle that has emerged from basic systems-level neuroscience is that brain rhythms appear to be necessary for normal cognition, including phase-amplitude coupling of slow and fast rhythms, spike-phase correlations such as hippocampal theta precession, and the re-activation of previously experienced neural activity on specific oscillatory frequencies. On the clinical side, cognitive symptoms in particular are among the least tractable and most disabling problems across a wide range of brain disorders, including autism and schizophrenia, because they affect the ability to live independently, such as holding a job and managing a bank account. Almost none of the existing treatments for neuropsychiatric illnesses were developed for the purpose of modulating systems-level coordination of neural activity, yet this is the level at which brain processes such as attention, memory, and social processing emerge. Even for medications that are based on a rational understanding of single-gene disorders, such as Fragile X, Rett, or Angelman syndromes, it has been surprisingly difficult to ameliorate cognitive, affective, or social symptoms in patients with these disorders. However, these medications act at the molecular level, and they might not have a useful effect at the systems level.  Therefore, it might be advantageous and even necessary to begin to address cognitive, affective, and social domains of function with a greater consideration of the systems-level electrophysiological patterns, and to test whether modulating these patterns can improve function. The key idea is to evaluate any intervention, whether pharmacological or not, at the systems level rather than exclusively at the molecular level.  Evaluating interventions at the systems level might be helpful regardless of whether the interventions themselves are at the genetic, molecular, or cellular level via pharmacology or gene editing, or whether the intervention is at the systems level such as electrical or magnetic stimulation. The purpose of this FOA is to seek applications that use active manipulations to address at least one, and ideally more, of the following points:

(1) in animals or humans, determine which parameters of neural coordination, when manipulated in isolation, improve particular aspects of cognitive, affective, or social processing;

(2) in animals or humans, determine how particular abnormalities at the cellular or molecular level, such as specific receptor dysfunction, affect the coordination of electrophysiological patterns during behavior;

(3) determine whether in vivo, systems-level electrophysiological changes in behaving animals predict analogous electrophysiological and cognitive improvements in normal humans or clinical populations; and

(4) use systems-level computational modeling to develop a principled understanding of the function and mechanisms by which oscillatory and other electrophysiological patterns unfold across the brain (cortically and subcortically) to impact cognitive, affective, or social processing.

Applications should address at least one, and ideally more, of the following topic areas: 

Topic 1:  Temporal dynamics of neural patterns that impact cognition, affect, or social behavior

Topic 2:  Understanding how molecular aberrations lead to systems-level discoordination

Topic 3:  Animal-to-human translation

Topic 4:  Computational modeling

R21 exploratory projects are limited to two years and $275,000 of direct costs.

 

 

NSF Integrated Earth Systems (15-600)

Due November 14 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15600/nsf15600.htm

IES is a program in the Division of Earth Sciences (EAR) that focuses specifically on the continental, terrestrial and deep Earth subsystems of the whole Earth system. Overall, the goals of IES are to:

•provide opportunity for collaborative, multidisciplinary research into the operation, dynamics and complexity of Earth systems at a budgetary scale between that of a typical project in the EAR Division's disciplinary programs and larger scale initiatives at the Directorate or Foundation level;

•support study of Earth systems that builds on process-oriented knowledge gained from EAR programmatic research and enables systems-level hypothesis testing and analysis of coupled processes;

•provide a "bridge" among the EAR disciplinary programs in order to foster the exchange of questions, ideas, and knowledge between disciplinary discovery and system-level investigations.

 

 

NSF EarthScope (15-578)

Due November 13, 2015; November 15 annually after that

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15578/nsf15578.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&amp

EarthScope is an Earth science program to explore the 4-dimensional structure of the North American continent. The EarthScope Program provides a framework for broad, integrated studies across the Earth sciences, including research on fault properties and the earthquake process, strain transfer, magmatic and hydrous fluids in the crust and mantle, plate boundary processes, large-scale continental deformation, continental structure and evolution, and composition and structure of the deep Earth. In addition, EarthScope offers a centralized forum for Earth science education at all levels and an excellent opportunity to develop cyberinfrastructure to integrate, distribute, and analyze diverse data sets.

This program will support projects that make use of recently established EarthScope resources: the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD), the  Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and EarthScope (GAGE) facility, and the Seismological Facilities for the Advancement of Geosciences and EarthScope (SAGE).

Proposals are invited that will provide standardized data, visualization and analysis tools, and data integration products to the scientific and education communities. Pilot projects or prototype development for producing and distributing data products such as multi-parameter models derived from integrated analyses, etc. are also encouraged.

The EarthScope program invites proposals that facilitate integration and synthesis of major outcomes of EarthScope research and education and outreach efforts. The program encourages a broad array of integration and synthesis proposals with the goal of elucidating and documenting the advances that the EarthScope program has made since its inception. Examples of possible types of proposals could include, but are not limited to:

-- Proposals for projects that synthesize major outcomes from EarthScope research, such as conferences, the development of formal or informal educational modules, or other activities that demonstrate the progress that EarthScope has made in advancing knowledge;

-- Proposals for projects that integrate multiple data sets and analyses from one or more regions of the continent with the goal of providing a comprehensive perspective on a scientific target outlined in the EarthScope Science Plan, including making new insights on Earth processes and identifying current knowledge gaps; and/or

-- Proposals for projects that develop community model products that could be used to advance further research.

NSF expects to make 15-25 awards from a $6 million pool. There is a limit of two proposals per investigator.

 

 

NSF Mathematical Biology (PD-12-7334)

Proposals accepted November 1-15 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5690

The Mathematical Biology Program supports research in areas of applied and computational mathematics with relevance to the biological sciences. Successful proposals are mathematically innovative and address challenging problems of interest to members of the biological community. Projects may include development of mathematical concepts and tools traditionally seen in other disciplinary programs within the Division of Mathematical Sciences, e.g., topology, probability, statistics, and computation.

 

 

NSF East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes for U.S. Graduate Students (EAPSI) (13-593)

Due second Thursday in November annually

http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf13593

An EAPSI award provides U.S. graduate students in science, engineering, and education: 1) first-hand research experiences in Australia, China, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Singapore, or Taiwan; 2) an introduction to the science, science policy, and scientific infrastructure of the respective location; and 3) an orientation to the society, culture, and language. It is expected that EAPSI awards will help students initiate professional relationships to enable future collaboration with foreign counterparts.

 

 

NSF: Integrated Earth Systems (NSF 16-589)

Due November 16 annually

http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf16589

This program will make an estimated 4-10 awards from a pool of up to $9.5 million. The largest award will be $3 million over five years. The goal of the Integrated Earth Systems (IES) program is to investigate the interplay among the continental, terrestrial, and interior systems of the planet. The program provides an opportunity for collaborative, multidisciplinary research into the operation, dynamics, and complexity of Earth systems that encompass the core of the Earth through the surface. Innovative projects that explore new research directions beyond those typically considered by core programs of the Division of Earth Sciences (EAR) are encouraged.

IES projects are expected to involve collaborations among investigators from different EAR disciplinary specialties. IES welcomes collaborations with researchers outside the disciplinary boundaries of EAR to help address questions related to Earth systems in line with IES goals.

 

 

NIH Advanced Development of Informatics Technologies for Cancer Research and Management (U24) (PAR-15-331)

Due November 20, 2015; June 14, 2016; November 21, 2016; June 14, 2017; November 20, 2017; June 14, 2018

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-15-331.html

This program supports advanced development and enhancement of emerging informatics technologies to improve the acquisition, management, analysis, and dissemination of data and knowledge across the cancer research continuum, including cancer biology, cancer treatment and diagnosis, cancer prevention, cancer control and epidemiology, and/or cancer health disparities. (PAR-15-332, by contrast, is for early-stage concepts.) As a component of the NCI's Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR) Initiative, this FOA focuses on emerging informatics technology, defined as one that has passed the initial prototyping and pilot development stage, has demonstrated potential to have a significant and broader impact, has compelling reasons for further improvement and enhancement, and has not been widely adopted in the cancer research field. The central mission of ITCR is to promote research-driven informatics technology across the development lifecycle to address priority needs in cancer research. In order to be successful, proposed development plans must have a clear rationale on why the proposed technology is needed and how it will benefit the cancer research field. In addition, mechanisms to solicit feedback from users and collaborators throughout the development process should be included. Awards can be up to $600,000 of direct costs per year for up to five years.

 

 

NIH Early-Stage Development of Informatics Technologies for Cancer Research and Management (U01) (PAR-15-332)

Due November 20, 2015; June 14, 2016; November 21, 2016; June 14, 2017; November 20, 2017; June 14, 2018

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-15-332.html

This will make U01 awards (cooperative agreements, which, unlike grants, involve a degree of collaboration with the sponsoring agency) for the development of enabling informatics technologies to improve the acquisition, management, analysis, and dissemination of data and knowledge across the cancer research continuum including cancer biology, cancer treatment and diagnosis, cancer prevention, cancer control and epidemiology, and/or cancer health disparities. As a component of the NCI's Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR) Program, this FOA focuses on early-stage development from prototyping to hardening and adaptation. Early-stage development is defined for the purpose of this FOA as the initial development or the significant modification of existing tools for new applications. The central mission of ITCR is to promote research-driven informatics technology across the development lifecycle to address priority needs in cancer research. In order to be successful, proposed development plans must have a clear rationale on why the proposed technology is needed and how it will benefit the cancer research field. In addition, mechanisms to solicit feedback from users and collaborators throughout the development process should be included. Awards will be up to $300,000 of direct costs per year for three years.

 

 

NIH Sustained Support for Informatics Resources for Cancer Research and Management (U24) (PAR-15-333)

Due November 20, 2015; June 14, 2016; November 21, 2016; June 14, 2017; November 20, 2017; June 14, 2018

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-15-333.html

This program supports the continued development and sustainment of high-value informatics research resources to serve current and emerging needs across the cancer research continuum including cancer biology, cancer treatment and diagnosis, cancer prevention, cancer control and epidemiology, and/or cancer health disparities. As a component of the NCI’s Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR) Program, this FOA focuses on supporting activities necessary for improved user experience and availability of existing, widely-adopted informatics tools and resources.  This is in contrast to early-stage and advanced development efforts to generate these tools and resources that are supported by separate ITCR FOAs. The central mission of ITCR is to promote research-driven informatics technology across the development lifecycle to address priority needs in cancer research. In order to be successful, the proposed sustainment plan must provide clear justifications for why the research resource should be maintained and how it has benefited and will continue to benefit the cancer research field.  In addition, mechanisms for assessing and maximizing the value of the resource to researchers and supporting collaboration and/or deep engagement between the resource and the targeted research community should be described. No guidance is provided on the budget.

 

 

NSF: Japan-US Network Opportunity 2 (JUNO2) (17-586)

Due November 30, 2017

https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf17586

This program will support collaborations with Japanese researchers to address compelling research challenges associated with enabling trustworthy networks supporting the Internet of Things (IoT) and cyber-physical systems (CPS). This NSF solicitation parallels an equivalent NICT solicitation. Proposals submitted under this solicitation must describe joint research with counterpart Japanese investigators who are requesting funding separately under the NICT solicitation.

This program seeks joint Japanese-US research projects that leverage each nation's expertise and address the following work areas:

1. Trustworthy IoT/CPS Networking: Developing the foundations for a future resilient edge cloud/network system to ensure trustworthy end-to-end networks, addressing such factors as the heterogeneity, characteristics, resource constraints and potential mobility of end devices/sensors, the diversity of access network technologies, the availability/placement of computing resources and Quality of Service (QoS) requirements. Examples of relevant areas include, but are not limited to:

--Trustworthy heterogeneous IoT/CPS network architectures;

--Trustworthy and real-time mobile edge cloud computing models;

--Disaster-resilient, robust sensing/networking/computing architectures for smart and connected communities;

--Architectures/protocols to support testing and verification for trustworthy infrastructure and services for smart and connected communities; and

--Models for predicting service/application quality in a compromised network.

 

2. Trustworthy Optical Communications and Networking: Addressing the need for trustworthy, high-availability, agile optical edge/access and integrated optical/wireless networks that are resilient against disasters, large traffic surges and other major disruptions. Examples of relevant areas include but are not limited to:

--Ultra-high-availability agile optical and edge/cloud-computing networks;

--Trustworthy integrated optical and mobile/wireless networks;

--Rapid self-configuring optical networks for resilience and service continuity;

--Trustworthy system architectures leveraging emerging low-cost integrated optical devices for IoT/CPS networking; and

--Disaster resilient and/or energy-conscious optical networks.

Awards will be up to $450,000 over three years for the U.S. side of the collaboration.

An individual may be a PI or co-PI on only one proposal.

 

 

December

 

 

Earth Sciences: Instrumentation and Facilities program (NSF 16-609)

Proposals accepted anytime

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2016/nsf16609/nsf16609.htm

The National Science Foundation has updated its Earth Sciences: Instrumentation and Facilities program, now NSF 16-609. This program supports requests for infrastructure that promotes research and education in the areas currently supported by the Division of Earth Sciences. EAR/IF will consider proposals for (1) Acquisition or Upgrade of Research Equipment that will advance laboratory and field investigations and student research training opportunities in the Earth sciences; (2) Development of New Instrumentation, Techniques or Software that will extend current research and research training capabilities in the Earth sciences; and (3) Community Facility Support to make complex and expensive instruments, systems of instruments or services broadly available to the Earth science research and student communities.

EAR/IF anticipates approximately $6,000,000 will be available annually for 30-50 new awards.

 

 

DARPA: Young Faculty Awards (DARPA-RA-17-01)

You are strongly encouraged to submit an Executive Summary by October 2, 2017. Full proposals are due December 4, 2017.

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=297218

To be eligible, you must be in a tenure-track position or within three years of getting tenure. U.S. citizenship is NOT required.

DARPA will accept proposals in these topic areas only:

1. Designing Ungameably Complex Games

2. Topological Photonics

3. Artificial Intelligence for Materials Discovery

4. Transformative Radiation Sensing

5. Engineered Interactions with the Energy of the Vacuum

6. Novel Methods for Nonsurgical Brain Interfaces

7. Self-forming Chronic Central Nervous System (CNS) Neural Interfaces

8. The Minimal Plant: Engineering Plants for Easy Biosynthetic Pathway Design with High Modularity

9. Antifouling Solutions for Large, Nonplanar Optical Surfaces

10. Replicating Cell-Cell Information Transfer

11. Programmable DNA Repair for Improved Genome Editing Outcomes

12. Efficient Integrated Nanophotonics

13. Adversarial Artificial Intelligence (AI)

14. Developing Intelligent Sensors for Fentanyl and Related Toxins

15. High Quality Atomic Traps and Waveguides

16. Wideband Efficiency in Millimeter Wave Power Amplifiers

17. Materials and Actuator Innovation for Small Scale Mobility and Manipulation

18. Reducing Software Attack Surface through Compiler-Rewriter Cooperation

19. Computational Models of the Spread of False or Misleading Information

20. Big Data Summarization

21. Decentralized Control of Networked Unmanned Autonomous Systems

22. REsilience through COmposable Logistics (RECOiL)

23. Wide Area Sensing Using the Internet of Things

24. Tactical Terrain Analysis

25. Thermostructural Sensitivity to Uncertainties

26. Swarm Intent Understanding

Each award will include a 24-month base period (a maximum of $500,000) and a 12-month option period (a maximum of $500,000).

 

 

NIH: BRAIN Initiative: Tools to Facilitate High-Throughput Microconnectivity Analysis (R01) (RFA-MH-18-805)

Due December 7, 2017 and November 13, 2018. Letters of intent are requested 30 days before submission.

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-MH-18-505.html#_Part_1._Overview

This program will support development and validation of novel tools to facilitate the detailed analysis of brain microconnectivity. The primary goal is to provide techniques and resources for understanding and delineating the structure of complex circuits at the level of synaptic connections, alone or in combination with methods for identifying important cellular and circuit features, for example, for classifying or characterizing cellular or synaptic phenotypes. 

This FOA seeks applications in areas including, but not limited to:

• Novel methods for tagging individual neurons such that cellular components of a functional circuit can be explored.

• Novel trans-synaptic tracers that can be used both at the EM and light-microscopic level.

• Innovative approaches to reduce the time and cost of determining high resolution synaptic connectivity by electron microscopy or other approaches.

• Novel computational approaches to analyze and segment neuronal connections from various imaging modalities. 

• Novel techniques for integrating micro-scale connectivity data with cellular or synaptic phenotypic information.

• Novel uses of super-resolution light microscopic approaches for identifying synaptic connections and mapping micro-circuits.

• Tools to identify gap junctions and characterize electrical synapses.

• Software tools for enhancing and scaling automated image processing, connectivity analysis, and data interpretation, including algorithms, information extraction routines, and user interfaces

• Datasets to serve as ground-truth for algorithm development and testing

• Develop a highquality toolbox of methods for efficiently mapping and annotating projections in experimental animals, including nonhuman primates, as well as in human tissue blocks.

• Methods to reduce the time needed to segment and/or analyze images from volume EM data sets

• Proof-of-principle demonstrations or reference datasets consisting of reconstructions of microconnectomes of individual animals, for example, demonstrating microconnectivity of cells that have been studied using optical physiology during specific behaviors. 

• Techniques for using electron and/or superresolution light microscopy to integrate molecular signatures of cells and synapses with their nanoscale connectivity.

NIH expects to make 3-7 awards from a $4 million pool. Proposals are due December 7, 2017 and November 13, 2018. Letters of intent are requested 30 days before submission.

 

 

NSF: Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (17-590)

Design & Development Due December 12, 2017 and December 11, 2018. Exploration & Design are accepted year-round.

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17590/nsf17590.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

This program will make five types of awards in two broad classes:

Engaged Student Learning: Exploration and Design (up to $300,000 over three years), Development and Implementation-Level 1 (up to $600,000 over three years), and Development and Implementation-Level 2 (up to $2 million over up to 5 years). Engaged Student Learning projects focus on design, development, and research studies that involve the creation, exploration, or implementation of tools, resources, and models that show particular promise for increasing the engagement of undergraduate students in their STEM learning and lead to measurable and lasting learning gains.

Institutional and Community Transformation: Exploration and Design (up to $300,000 over three years) and Development and Implementation (up to $3 million over up to five years). Institutional and Community Transformation projects use innovative approaches to increase the use of highly effective, evidence-based STEM teaching and learning, curricular, and co-curricular practices in institutions of higher education or across/within disciplinary communities. These projects may be proposed by an institution or set of institutions; alternatively, community proposals may be submitted through professional communities, including discipline-based professional societies and networks or organizations that represent institutions of higher education. Projects are expected to be both evidence-based and knowledge-generating.

All projects must support the following IUSE: EHR goals:

• use and build evidence about improved STEM instructional practices;

design and study innovative learning opportunities, including cyber-learning;

• create, implement, and test program, curricular, course, and technology-driven models;

• develop, implement, and test creative approaches for adoption of education research into disciplinary teaching;

• demonstrate effectiveness of validated practices in a variety of institutional settings;

• develop and validate assessments/metrics for undergraduate STEM learning and instructional practice; and

• conduct fundamental research on issues of undergraduate STEM teaching and learning.

All projects are expected to generate new knowledge through an educational research study that poses one or more significant questions and uses a research design that permits direct investigation of the questions.

 

 

Air Force Research Laboratory: Research Collaboration Program (BAA-RQKM-2013-0005)

Open to December 20, 2017

http://www07.grants.gov/search/search.do?&mode=VIEW&oppId=212295 (click on Full Announcement near the top-center of the screen)

The Air Force Research Laboratory has released BAA-RQKM-2013-0005, AFRL Research Collaboration Program. This program will make multiple awards, mostly in the $100,000 to $750,000 range for up to four years, in materials and manufacturing research and aerospace sensors research. About $49 million is expected to be available. Specific areas of interest are listed below; the solicitation elaborates on each topic area.

A. Structural Materials and Applications Core Technical Competency

1. Characterization, Sensing and Analytics (CSA) Research

2. Metallic Materials and Processes (MM&P) Research

3. Metals Probabilistic Performance Prediction (MP^3) Research

4. Ceramic Materials and Processes (CM&P) Research

5. Composites Performance (CP) Research

6. Organic Matrix Composites Materials and Processes (OMC M&P Research)

B. Functional Materials and Applications Core Technical Competency

1. Nanoscale Transport Materials and Processes (NTM&P) Research

2. Quantum Semiconductor Materials and Processes (QSM&P) Research

3. Flexible Materials and Devices (FM&D) Research

4. Biomaterials Materials and Processes (BM&P) Research

5. Optical Materials and Processes (OM&P) Research

6. Hardened Materials and Processing Research

C. Support for Operations Core Technical Competency

1. Systems Support sub-CTC

D. Manufacturing Technology Core Technical Competency:

1. Direct Digital Manufacturing Methods for Aerospace components

2. Investigation of the Effects of Nanoparticle Alignment on the Mechanical Properties of Composite Materials during Injection and Compression Molding

3. Lithium Ion Battery Manufacturing Research

4. Probabilistic Analysis of Jet Engine Turbine Disk and Turbine Blade Manufacturing Processes

5. Robotics Manufacturing Research

6. Manufacturing of High Temperature Ceramic Matrix Composites for Advanced Air Breathing Aerospace Propulsion Systems

7. Design for Manufacturing / Producibility modeling

8. Virtual Manufacturing

9. Flexible substrate sensor processing

10. Large-scale or pilot-level continuous production of nanoscale materials with in-situ metrology

11. Manufacturing science for metamaterials

12. Responsive Integrated Supply Base: industrial base network connectivity, insight, and tools for optimum supply chain performance and risk management

13. Factory of the Future: Flexible, rate-independent assembly and fabrication technologies with enterprise connectivity

E. Radio Frequency (RF) Sensing Core Technical Competency

F. Electro-Optical Sensing Core Technical Competency

G. Spectrum Warfare Core Technical Competency

H. Layered Sensing Exploitation Core Technical Competency

I. Enabling Sensor Devices/Components Core Technical Competency

White papers (5 pp) will be accepted until December 20, 2017. If they like your white paper, they will invite a full proposal.

Although the thrust of this program is academic partnerships, we can’t assume that every project will automatically be considered fundamental research. Therefore, in preliminary discussions and proposal preparation, we need to agree that none of our work will fall under export controls or International Trafficking in Arms Regulations (ITAR). Fundamental research is basic research and early-stage development, performed at an academic institution. Once you get out from under that umbrella, you lose the ability to employ non-citizens, and you probably lose the right to publish your results. That’s why we don’t go there.

 

 

Federal Aviation Administration Grants for Aviation Research (FAA-12-01)

Open to December 2019

http://www07.grants.gov/search/search.do?&mode=VIEW&oppId=134953 (click on Application at the top-right of the screen, and then the “download” link under Instructions and Application, and then download the instructions)

The Federal Aviation Administration has released Program Solicitation FAA-12-01, Grants for Aviation Research. This program will accept proposals on an ongoing basis through December 2019 in the following nine areas. The solicitation elaborates on each of these areas.

1. Capacity and Air Traffic Control Technology

2. Communications, Navigation, and Surveillance

3. Aviation Weather

4. Airports

5. Aircraft Safety Technology

6. Human Factors and Aviation Medicine

7. Environment and Energy

8. Systems Science/Operations Research

9. Commercial Space Transportation

Cost sharing is strongly encouraged and will be an evaluation criterion.

 

 

NSF: Smart and Autonomous Systems (Program Solicitation 16-608)

Due December 19, 2016; December 11, 2017; Second Monday in December, annually thereafter

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2016/nsf16608/nsf16608.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

The S&AS program focuses on IPS that are aware of their own capabilities and limitations, require minimal or no human intervention, are able to learn and adapt their behaviors, and are deployed for the purpose of long-term interaction with entities based on knowledge-rich information. The research themes for S&AS include IPS being: (a) cognizant of their capabilities and limitations; (b) taskable to execute high-level and possibly vague instructions; (c) reflective to improve performance over time; and (d) ethical, adhering to societal and legal rules. All of these themes are couched in the context of (e) knowledge-rich systems that perform various types of reasoning, including semantic, probabilistic, and commonsense reasoning.

There are two classes of proposals:

--Foundational projects focus on research into algorithms and technologies that directly support a specific characteristic or component of IPS. While foundational investigations are not required to utilize a physical testbed, they must engage in an evaluation designed to demonstrate relevance to an IPS specified in that project plan. Approximately 15-25 awards will be Foundational proposals from $350K to 700K in total costs for up to 3 years.

--Integrative projects focus on integrating two or more components of IPS into increasingly smart and autonomous systems. Integrative projects should have longer-term vision, with objectives that could not be attained simply by a collection of smaller projects provided with similar resources. Integrative projects must include evaluation of physical systems, preferably in real-world settings. Integrative projects are encouraged to have multiple PIs, preferably from different disciplines. Approximately 15-25 awards will be Foundational proposals from $350K to 700K in total costs for up to 3 years. Approximately 10-15 awards will be Integrative proposals from $500K to $1.4M in total costs for up to 4 years.

You may serve as a PI, co-PI, or Senior Personnel in no more than 2 proposals.

Duplicate or substantially similar proposals will be returned without review, including those substantially similar to previously declined proposals that have not been revised to address concerns raised by reviewers.

 

 

NIH: Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats (CounterACT) (R21) (PAR-15-315)

Letters of intent are due December 26, 2015; December 31, 2016; and December 30, 2017. Proposals are due January 26, 2016; January 31, 2017; and January 30, 2018.

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-13-315.html

This program will support R21 exploratory/developmental projects (up to $275,000 direct over two years) for new and improved therapeutics to mitigate the health effects of chemical threats. Chemical threats are toxic chemicals that could be used in a terrorist attack or accidentally released from industrial production, storage or shipping. They include traditional chemical warfare agents, toxic industrial chemicals, and pesticides. The scope of the research includes target/candidate identification and characterization, through candidate optimization, and demonstration of in vivo efficacy. Projects supported by this FOA are expected to generate preliminary preclinical, screening, and/or efficacy data that would facilitate the development of competitive applications for more extensive support from the NIH CounterACT Cooperative Agreement programs or other related initiatives.

The scope is limited to drug or biologic countermeasures. Sensing technology is not funded in this program.

 

 

Air Force Research Laboratory: Directed Energy and Space Vehicles (BAA-RVKV-2015-0003)

Open to December 2021

http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=280237 (then click through the “Package” tab to download the Instructions, the actual BAA.)

. This BAA will be open for five years to accept proposals from academic institutions in the following topic areas. No funding is currently available through this BAA, so it’s the kind of thing where you need to find a champion with AFRL, and then they can figure out a way to get the money. You can go ahead and submit a proposal in response to this opportunity, but its chances will not be good unless you already have someone inside AFRL waiting for it.

The objective of this effort is to establish a combined AFRL RD/RV University Cooperative Agreement vehicle to efficiently award research funds to universities. These efforts will investigate new concepts as well as the ancillary supporting technologies for directed energy and space vehicles and to enhance theoretical analyses, exploratory studies, or experiments conducted by educational institutions; important for technological advance and innovative activities in which educational institutions have limited resources.

Directed Energy:

1. Lasers

2. Aero-effects and Airborne Beam Control

3. High-power Microwaves

4. Weapons Modeling & Simulation

5. Space Domain Awareness

6. Optics and Beam Control

7. Laser Guide Stars

8. Sensors

9. Optical System Modeling and Simulation

10. Quantum Computer Technology

Space Vehicles:

1. Structures

2. Space Power

3. Communications Guidance Navigation and Control:

4. Space Sensors

5. Multisensory Information Fusion

6. Thermal Management

7. Electronics/Radiation Effects/Protection

8. Space Environment

9. Space System Modeling and Simulation

10. Quantum Technologies

This program is designed for academic institutions, but it is possible that projects can go beyond the Fundamental level, into areas where export control or International Trafficking in Arms Regulations apply. We need to be careful that any project we propose is all Fundamental Research, generally synonymous with basic research.

 

 

January

 

 

National Robotics Initiative 2017-18 (NSF 17-518)

Due February 2, 2017; January 11, 2018

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=503641

The National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Department of Energy, and U.S. Department of Defense have jointly released NSF 17-518, National Robotics Initiative 2.0: Ubiquitous Collaborative Robots (NRI-2.0).  The goal of the National Robotics Initiative (NRI) is to support fundamental research that will accelerate the development and use of robots in the United States that work beside or cooperatively with people. The original NRI program focused on innovative robotics research that emphasized the realization of collaborative robots (co-robots) working in symbiotic relationships with human partners. The NRI-2.0 program significantly extends this theme to focus on issues of scalability: how teams of multiple robots and multiple humans can interact and collaborate effectively; how robots can be designed to facilitate achievement of a variety of tasks in a variety of environments, with minimal modification to the hardware and software; how robots can learn to perform more effectively and efficiently, using large pools of information from the cloud, other robots, and other people; and how the design of the robots' hardware and software can facilitate large-scale, reliable operation. In addition, the program supports innovative approaches to establish and infuse robotics into educational curricula, advance the robotics workforce through education pathways, and explore the social, behavioral, and economic implications of our future with ubiquitous collaborative robots. Collaboration between academic, industry, non-profit, and other organizations is encouraged to establish better linkages between fundamental science and engineering and technology development, deployment and use. Well-justified international collaborations that add significant value to the proposed research and education activities will also be considered.

Proposals for infrastructure and testbeds will be considered. The program will also accept proposals for K-16 educational projects based on robotics.

The program is budgeted at $30 million to $40 million per year, and 40-70 awards per year are expected. There are two classes of awards: Foundational projects will range from $350,000 to $750,000 in total costs for up to three years, and Integrative projects will range from $500,000 to $1,500,000 in total costs for up to four years. Different sponsoring agencies have different funding criteria, which are outlined in the solicitation.

There is a limit of two proposals per individual per year. There is no institutional limit.

 

 

NSF/Intel Partnership on Foundational Microarchitecture Research (FoMR) (17-597)

Due January 12, 2018

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17597/nsf17597.htm

This program will make an estimated 6 awards of up to $500,000 each over three years to support microarchitecture technique innovations beyond simplistic, incremental scaling of existing microarchitectural structures. Specifically, FoMR seeks to advance research that has the following characteristics: (1) high IPC (instructions per cycle) techniques ranging from microarchitecture to code generation; (2) “microarchitecture turbo” techniques that marshal chip resources and system memory bandwidth to accelerate sequential or single-threaded programs; and (3) techniques to support efficient compiler code generation. Advances in these areas promise to provide significant performance improvements to continue the cadence promised by Moore’s Law.

An individual may be PI, co-PI, or Senior Person on one proposal.

 

 

NIH: Outstanding New Environmental Scientist (RFA-ES-15-020)

Letters of intent are due January 26, 2016; January 28, 2017; January 27, 2018. Full proposals are due February 26, 2016; February 28, 2017; February 27, 2018.

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-ES-15-020.html

This program will make 5-6 awards per year to New Investigators whose research is in environmental health science. For purposes of this program, a New/Early Stage Investigator is within 10 years of completing the Ph.D. or M.D. degree and must have a tenure-track appointment. It is not entirely clear, but you are probably disqualified if you have been PI on another NIH research award, with certain exceptions. Your research must be pertinent to the NIEHS 2012-2017 Strategic plan, Advancing Science, Improving Health: A Plan for Environmental Health Sciences Research. 

Only one application per school or college within a university is allowed – that is, only one proposal from BCOE, one from CNAS, one from SOM. In light of that, I think each school/college can handle the selection process on its own. BCOE people, please contact me if you are interested in this; if we have more than one person, we will work out a process to decide what goes forward.

Awards are $250,000 per year of direct costs per year for up to five years, plus an additional $250,000 for “career enhancement” that can be spent over the life of the award. NIH expects to make 5-6 awards per year.

 

 

 

February

 

 

NATO: Science for Peace and Security

Proposals accepted anytime; reviews take place February 1 and May 15

http://www.nato.int/cps/en/natolive/87260.htm

NATO has released its solicitation for the Science for Peace and Security program. This program makes three-year awards to facilitate international collaborations in areas of interest to NATO. Funds can be used for equipment, travel, training, short-term consultants, and stipends for young investigators. Funds may not be used for salaries, tuition, research costs, or overhead.

Every project must involve at least one PI from a NATO member company (that’s us) and at least one from a “NATO partner” country: Afghanistan*, Algeria*, Armenia*, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan*, Bahrain, Belarus*, Bosnia and Herzegovina*, Egypt*, Finland, Georgia*, Iraq*, Ireland, Israel, Japan, Jordan*, Kazakhstan*, Kuwait, Kyrgyz Republic*, Malta, Mauritania*, Moldova*, Mongolia*, Montenegro*, Morocco*, New Zealand, Pakistan*, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Serbia*, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan*, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia†*, Tunisia*, Turkmenistan*, Ukraine*, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan*. Young researchers from partner countries indicated with * are eligible for SPS-funded stipends. Young researchers from NATO countries may be eligible on a case-by-case basis.

Roughly half of the budget is generally allocated to equipment, ~20% to training and travel, and up to 15% to stipends. These proportions are meant as guidelines only, not fixed limits, and will vary according to the needs of each project. If you intend to request more than 400,000 euros, you need to talk to a program officer first.

Topic areas of interest are:

1)         Facilitate mutually beneficial cooperation on issues of common interest, including international efforts to meet emerging security challenges

a)         Counter-Terrorism

i)          Methods for the protection of critical infrastructure, supplies and personnel

ii)          Human factors in the defence against terrorism

iii)         Detection technologies against the terrorist threat for explosive devices and other illicit activities

iv)         Risk management, best practices and technologies in response to terrorism.

b)         Energy Security

i)          Innovative energy solutions for the military; battlefield energy solutions; renewable energy solutions with military applications;

ii)          Energy infrastructure security;

iii)         Maritime aspects of energy security;

iv)         Technological aspects of energy security.

c)         Cyber Defence

i)          Critical infrastructure protection, including sharing of best practices, capacity building and policies;

ii)          Support in developing cyber defence capabilities, including new technologies and support to the construction of information technology infrastructure;

iii)         Cyber defence situation awareness.

d)         Defence against CBRN Agents

i)          Methods and technology regarding the protection against, diagnosing effects, detection, decontamination, destruction, disposal and containment of CBRN agents;

ii)          Risk management and recovery strategies and technologies;

iii)         Medical countermeasures against CBRN agents.

e)         Environmental Security

i)          Security issues arising from key environmental and resource constraints, including health risks, climate change, water scarcity and increasing energy needs, which have the potential to significantly affect NATO’s planning and operations;

ii)          Disaster forecast and prevention of natural catastrophes;

iii)         Defence-related environmental issues.

 2)         Enhance support for NATO-led operations and missions

a)         Provision of civilian support through SPS Key Priorities;

b)         Provision of access to information through internet connectivity as in the SILK-Afghanistan Programme;

c)         Cultural and social aspects in military operations and missions;

d)         Enhancing cooperation with other international actors.

 3)         Enhance awareness on security developments including through early warning, with a view to preventing crises

a)         Security-related Advanced Technology:

Emerging technologies including nanotechnology, optical technology, micro satellites, metallurgy and the development of UAV platforms.

b)         Border and Port Security

i)          Border and port security technology;

ii)          Cross border communication systems and data fusion;

iii)         Expert advice and assessments of border security needs and best practice.

c)         Mine and Unexploded Ordnance Detection and Clearance

i)          Development and provision of advanced technologies, methodologies and best practice;

ii)          Solutions to counter improvised explosive devices (IED).

 4)         Human and Social Aspects of Security related to NATO’s strategic objectives

 5)         Any project related clearly linked to a threat to security not otherwise defined in these priorities may also be considered for funding under the SPS Programme. Such proposals will be examined for links to NATO’s Strategic Objectives.

Last updated 04-18-17 SS

 

 

NSF/DOE: Algorithms for Modern Power Systems (AMPS)

Due February 13, 2017, and the second Monday in February annually after that.

https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?WT.z_pims_id=505322&ods_key=nsf17521

Note that this is from the NSF Division of Mathematical Sciences, not engineering, so maybe you want to talk to your friends in Math or Statistics about teaming up.

This program will make an estimated 4-10 awards from a $1.2 million pool to develop the next generation of mathematical and statistical algorithms for improvement of the security, reliability, and efficiency of the modern power grid. Because the complicated nature of the power grid itself presents a major barrier to its modeling and simulation, the AMPS program aims to catalyze fruitful collaborative research projects to develop mathematical and statistical tools needed to address operational and planning issues for the power grid. The program encourages interdisciplinary efforts, with the involvement of experts in a variety of disciplines such as power system engineering, mathematics, statistics, and financial mathematics.

Research topics could include, but are not limited to: new statistical and uncertainty-analysis-based methods that provide probabilistic or robust performance guarantees accounting for uncertainty and fluctuations in loads, generation, and other components of the system; methods for characterizing and controlling resiliency and reliability; probabilistic approaches to manage risk and uncertainty, uncertainty quantification; model reduction; model validation; anomaly detection; data analytics; risk hedging; network theory; and computational methods that are scalable without sacrificing performance.

 

 

NSF/DOE: Algorithms for Modern Power Systems (AMPS) (NSF 17-521)

Due February 17, 2017, and second Monday of February after that

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17521/nsf17521.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

This program will make 4-10 awards from a $1.2 million pool for research to develop the next generation of mathematical and statistical algorithms for improvement of the security, reliability, and efficiency of the modern power grid. The sponsor in NSF is the Division of Mathematical Sciences, so this might be a good cue that you want to work with someone from Statistics or Math.

The AMPS program will support research projects that aim to address mathematical and statistical challenges relating to the complexity of the electrical grid. Because the complicated nature of the power grid itself presents a major barrier to its modeling and simulation, the AMPS program aims to catalyze fruitful collaborative research projects to develop mathematical and statistical tools needed to address operational and planning issues for the power grid. The program encourages interdisciplinary efforts, with the involvement of experts in a variety of disciplines such as power system engineering, mathematics, statistics, and financial mathematics.

Research topics could include, but are not limited to: new statistical and uncertainty-analysis-based methods that provide probabilistic or robust performance guarantees accounting for uncertainty and fluctuations in loads, generation, and other components of the system; methods for characterizing and controlling resiliency and reliability; probabilistic approaches to manage risk and uncertainty, uncertainty quantification; model reduction; model validation; anomaly detection; data analytics; risk hedging; network theory; and computational methods that are scalable without sacrificing performance.

 

 

NSF Algorithms for Threat Detection (17-510)

Due February 21, 2017, and third Tuesday in February annually after that

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17510/nsf17510.htm

This program (an update of NSF 12-502) is led by the NSF Directorate for Mathematical & Physical Sciences (not computing), and it is a joint effort with the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. The focus is now on analysis of large geospatial datasets.

The recent growth of publicly available geospatial data sources now opens the possibility to document and understand the complicated dynamics of communities and identify patterns that may be indicative of threats. The ability to analyze such data in near real-time offers the potential to identify threat indicators quickly enough to prevent violent acts or limit their impact.

The Algorithms for Threat Detection program supports research on new ways to use spatiotemporal datasets to develop quantitative models of human dynamics. The objectives include improved representation of complicated group dynamics and the development of algorithms that can process data in near real-time to accurately identify unusual events and forecast future threats indicated by those events.

NSF expects to make 10-20 awards annually from a $3 million pool.

 

 

NSF: Professional Formation of Engineers (NSF 17-514)

Due February 23, 2017, and last Thursday of February after that

https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17514/nsf17514.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

This program will make an estimated 15 awards from a $3 million pool to support research that considers the construction of engineering knowledge, engineering identity, and the engineering profession, as well as interventions that expand the boundaries of each of these. The objective of the PFE program is to create and support an innovative and inclusive engineering profession for the 21st Century.

The emphasis is on initiating research projects in professional formation of engineers rather than supporting research on any specific topic. Proposals from senior faculty who want to branch out into a deeper understanding of engineering education are encouraged. Projects should combine engineering approaches with those from learning and cognitive sciences, engineering education, social sciences, and related fields in synergistic ways and enable engineering faculty to develop expertise in engineering education research. The PI or at least one co-PI should have little or no experience conducting social science research.

This summary seems kind of squishy, but it comes into better focus if you read the whole solicitation.

 

 

NSF: Cyberinfrastructure for Emerging Science and Engineering Research  (CESER) (PD 17-7684)

Proposals accepted anytime

https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505385

The overall goal of the Cyberinfrastructure for Emerging Science and Engineering Research (CESER) program is to foster the development of innovative cyberinfrastructure (CI) technologies and new means of leveraging existing CI resources to catalyze emerging areas of potentially transformative science and engineering research, including NSF priority areas, national strategic initiatives, and international collaborative research.

The CESER Program replaces the Strategic Technologies for Cyberinfrastructure (STCI) program. STCI's focus on supporting opportunities to advance technology across the CI ecosystem is incorporated into CESER with a new emphasis on enabling emerging science and engineering research areas.

A key programmatic objective of CESER is to support early-stage efforts by collaborative teams of domain scientists and cyberinfrastructure developers/implementers to identify and address cyberinfrastructure needs in new research areas through the development and deployment of pilot, experimental, and innovative hardware or software systems or other unique cyberinfrastructure activities that enable new pathways to discovery.

Another program objective is to encourage holistic, systematic, and multidisciplinary CI approaches to address new opportunities to enable science and engineering research. Projects that integrate multiple cyberinfrastructure disciplines – such as computing, data infrastructure, software, workflow systems, and networking - to address an emerging scientific challenge are particularly welcomed. CESER will also support projects that aim to expand the spectrum of research disciplines that, and users who, engage and contribute to a dynamic and enduring national research cyberinfrastructure ecosystem.

 

 

Army Corps of Engineers Engineer R&D Center Broad Agency Announcement

(W912HZ-17-BAA-01)

Open indefinitely

http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=291690

The Army invite proposals under literally dozens of topics in these laboratories and programs:

Conference & Symposia Grants

Coastal & Hydraulics Laboratory

Geotechnical & Structures Laboratory

Environmental Laboratory

Information Technology Laboratory

Construction Engineering Research Laboratory

Cold Regions Research & Engineering Laboratory

Geospatial Research Laboratory

 

 

March

 

 

DARPA Strategic Technologies (HR001117S0015)

Open to March 21, 2018

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=292671

This program seeks innovative ideas in the following topic areas. It does not necessarily follow that there is money for these ideas. You are strongly encouraged to submit an abstract before a full proposal. In general, VC Pazzani recommends approaching a program officer directly, outside of the BAA, about an idea. Still, this might be one way to get your idea inside the door.

The topic areas:

Situation Understanding

Multi-Domain Maneuver: (a) Planning and Control; (b) Communications and Networking

Position, Navigation, and Time (PNT)

Hybrid Effects

System of Systems (SoS)

Maritime Systems

System of Systems-Enhanced Small Units (SESU)

Foundational Strategic Technologies and Systems

 

 

April

 

 

NSF Expeditions in Computing (16-535)

Pre-proposal due May 2, 2016, and April 25, 2018. Full proposals will be due January 18, 2017, and January 16, 2019

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2016/nsf16535/nsf16535.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

This program will make an estimated 2-4 awards of up to $2 million per year for five years, making it the CISE Directorate’s largest grant program. Cleary the PI should come from computer science and/or engineering, but the involvement of other science and engineering domains is appropriate. In planning Expeditions projects, investigators are encouraged to come together within or across departments or institutions to combine their creative talents in the identification of compelling, transformative research agendas that promise disruptive innovations in computing and information for many years to come.

The Expeditions program has three goals:

-- To catalyze far-reaching research or research cyberinfrastructure explorations motivated by deep scientific questions or hard problems in the computing and information fields and/or by compelling applications and novel technologies that promise significant scientific and/or societal benefits;

-- To inspire current and future generations of Americans, especially those from under-represented groups, to pursue rewarding careers in computer and information science and engineering; and

-- To stimulate significant research and education outcomes that, through effective knowledge transfer mechanisms, promise scientific, economic and/or other societal benefits.

Projects supported by the Expeditions program comprise the following characteristics:

-- Foster research climates that nurture creativity and informed risk-taking, and value complementary research and education contributions such that the whole Expeditions project is greater than the sum of its parts;

-- Draw upon well-integrated, diverse teams of investigators from computer and information science and engineering disciplines, and from other fields of science and engineering as appropriate to the project;

-- Stimulate effective knowledge transfer; and

-- Demonstrate experimental systems, support shared experimental facilities (including instruments, platforms and/or testbeds), and/or deploy research cyberinfrastructure to accelerate discovery and learning.

There is a limit of one proposal per investigator, but no limit on the  number of proposals per institution.

 

 

Army Geospatial Agency BAA

Open to April 30, 2018

https://www.fbo.gov/notices/676f056cedf6e3ffd549623344271840

The Army Geospatial Agency has released its Broad Agency Announcement for 2017-18, Solicitation #W5J9CQ-17-R-0002. The Army will accept concept papers (5 pp) for any of these topics through April 30, 2018, and will invite full proposals if there is interest. Awards will be purchase orders or contracts, not grants, but that shouldn’t be too much of an issue.

Here are the topics; the solicitation has a paragraph or more of discussion on each one.

ENTERPRISE SUPPORT BRANCH

Army Geospatial Enterprise Operations (AGC-01).

Geospatial Standards (AGC-02).

Geospatial Applications and Services (AGC-03).

Data Model Development (AGC-04).

Test and Certification (AGC-05).

Army Geospatial Enterprise Migration (AGC-06).

Geospatial Modeling & Simulation (AGC-07)

Geospatial Experimentation (AGC-08)

Cloud Computing (AGC-09)

Disconnected Intermittent Low-Bandwidth (DIL)(AGC -10)

Geospatial Architecture (AGC-11)

Geospatial Data Center Architectures (AGC-12)

Geospatial Content Management Methods (AGC-13)

SYSTEMS ACQUISITION BRANCH

Engineer Reconnaissance and Surveying Applications and Services (AGC-14)

Systems Evaluation (AGC-15)

Technical Data Package Maintenance (AGC-16)

Standardization (AGC-17)

SYSTEMS APPLICATIONS AND INTEGRATION

Imagery Exploitation (AGC-20)

Mission Command Networks, Systems and Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance ISR (AGC-21)

Joint Operational Technologies & Integration (AGC-22)

Civil Military Operations (AGC-23)

Army and Joint Simulations (AGC-24)

Database Development (AGC-25)

WARFIGHTER SUPPORT: TERRAIN ANALYSIS

Terrain Analysis (AGC-26)

Modernization of Warfighter Support Directorate. (AGC-27)

Cartographic Technical Services (AGC-28)

GEOSPATIAL DATA BRANCH

Geospatial Information (AGC-29)

Acquisition Monitoring (AGC-30)

HYDROLOGIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

Military Hydrology and Water Detection (AGC-31)

Water Detection and Drilling Management (AGC-32)

Cultural Mapping (AGC-33)

Historical Photo Analyses (AGC-34)

TACTICAL SOURCE

Database Development (AGC- 35)

Advanced Airborne Sensors (AGC-36)

Rendering and Display (AGC-37)

Integration and Exploitation (AGC-38)

Battlefield Terrain and Environment (AGC-39)

Data Manipulation (AGC-40)

Geospatial Information Exploitation (AGC-41)

Data Generation (AGC-42)

Geospatial Communications (AGC-43)

Data Representation (AGC-44)

Image Registration (AGC-45)

Visualization (AGC-47)

Advanced Registration (AGC-48)

Photogrammetric Techniques for Large Data Sets (AGC-49)

Geospatial Intelligence Video/Terrestrial Sensors (AGC-50)

Tactical Unmanned Aircraft System (TUAS) (AGC-51)

Geospatial Software & Application Development (AGC-52)

 

 

May

 

 

NIH: Innovation Grants to Nurture Initial Translational Efforts (IGNITE)

Open to May 8, 2018

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-15-070.html: Assay Development and Therapeutic Agent Identification and Characterization to Support Therapeutic Discovery (R21/R33)

This program supports development of in vitro and/or ex vivo assays and iterative screening efforts to identify and characterize potential therapeutic agents for neurological disorders. This FOA is part of a suite of Innovation Grants to Nurture Initial Translational Efforts (IGNITE) to advance projects to the point where they can meet the entry criteria for NINDS Cooperative Research to Enable and Advance Translational Enterprises program (CREATE) for biologics, biotechnology products, the Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network (BPN) for small molecules, or other translational program.

http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=270431

 

 

Pharmacodynamics and In vivo Efficacy Studies for Small Molecules and Biologics/Biotechnology Products (R21/R33)

Open to May 8, 2018

This FOA provides funding to conduct pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, and in vivo efficacy studies to demonstrate that proposed therapeutic agent(s) have sufficient biological activity to warrant further development to treat neurological disorders. Therapeutic agents may include but are not limited to small molecules, biologics or biotechnology-derived products. This FOA is part of a suite of Innovation Grants to Nurture Initial Translational Efforts (IGNITE) to advance projects to the point where they can meet the entry criteria for NINDS Cooperative Research to Enable and Advance Translational Enterprises program (CREATE) for biologics, biotechnology products, the Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network (BPN) for small molecules, or other translational program.

http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=279927

 

 

Innovation Grants to Nurture Initial Translational Efforts (IGNITE):  Development and Validation of Model Systems and/or Pharmacodynamic Markers to Facilitate the Discovery of Neurotherapeutics (R21/R33)

Open to May 8, 2018

This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) encourages the development and validation of: 1) animal models and human tissue ex vivo systems that recapitulate the phenotypic and physiologic characteristics of a defined neurological disorder and/or 2) clinically feasible pharmacodynamic markers for therapeutics designed to treat neurological disease. The goal of this FOA is to promote a significant improvement in the translational relevance of animal models, ex vivo systems, testing paradigms, and endpoints that will be utilized to facilitate the development of neurotherapeutics. Ideally, endpoints proposed in applications for this FOA would have the potential to provide feasible and meaningful assessments of efficacy following therapeutic intervention that would be applicable in both preclinical and clinical settings. This FOA is not intended to support the development of animal and ex vivo model systems for the interrogation of disease etiology or for the identification of new drug targets. It is also not intended to support human clinical validation of model systems or pharmacodynamic markers. This FOA is part of a suite of Innovation Grants to Nurture Initial Translational Efforts (IGNITE) focused on enabling the exploratory and early stages of drug discovery.

 

 

 

June

 

DOD Medical Countermeasures Systems (BAA MCS-BAA-17-01)

Pre-proposals accepted until June 1, 2018

at https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity&mode=form&tab=core&id=a156930223d0344d97c533a662ff83d9

The Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical and Biological Defense has released Broad Agency Announcement MCS-BAA-17-01, Medical Countermeasures Systems. This BAA invites pre-proposals in the following topic areas. Pre-proposals can lead to invitations for full proposals. In general, this program does not support basic research; it is interested in efforts directed toward the development of enabling technologies that speed up the advanced development process leading to FDA approval of countermeasures. And in general they expect 1:1 cost sharing.

1. MEDICAL BIOLOGICAL PROPHYLAXIS

a. Biological Medical Prophylaxis provides medical countermeasures against biological warfare agents.

b. Biological Medical Prophylaxis countermeasures should protect against battle space challenge of biological warfare agents (BWA).

c. Other overarching priorities in Biological Medical Prophylaxis.

d. Prevention, treatment, or supportive care regimens for adverse reactions to prophylaxis or pretreatments.

e. Enabling technologies that support, facilitate, or accelerate the development or licensure of Biological Medical Prophylaxis countermeasures.

2. MEDICAL CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL COUNTERMEASURES

a. Prophylactic/pretreatment and therapeutic pharmaceuticals

3. MEDICAL RADIOLOGICAL COUNTERMEASURES

The goal of the Medical Radiological Countermeasures (MRADC) projects are to select, develop, and manufacture FDA-approved drugs, biologics and diagnostics (e.g., biodosimetry) to increase survival and decrease incapacity by treating or detecting the incipient or manifest radiation injury following exposure to radiation from nuclear or radiological weapons so that Warfighters can maintain operational effectiveness.

4. MEDICAL DIAGNOSTIC AND SURVEILLANCE SYSTEMS

The DoD has a need for technologies for the prediction, detection, identification, and clinical diagnosis of infection by warfare pathogens and toxins. Sensitivity, specificity, ease of use, and deployability (size, weight, power requirements, and reduced consumables) are critical features of such systems.

5. DEFENSE BIOLOGICAL PRODUCT ASSURANCE OFFICE

To develop, test, produce, field and sustain timely, affordable Joint Integrated Force Protection, CBRNE Analytics and Response Capabilities to protect our Forces at home and abroad from warfare threats to national security in the face of a changing, complex and uncertain global environment.

 

 

NIH: Integrative Computational Biology for Analysis of NHLBI TOPMed Data (R01) (RFA-18-HL-020)

Optional letters of intent are due June 6, 2017, and June 6, 2018. Full proposals are due July 6, 2017, and July 6, 2018.

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HL-18-020.html

This program will make research awards to mine the data produced by the existing Trans Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) program. TOPMed aims to utilize high throughput omics to characterize a variety of HLBS diseases. TOPMed is well on its way to collecting whole genome sequence from over 100,000 well phenotyped individuals and is currently generating high-throughput expression and other “omics” data (RNA, DNA methylation, metabolites, proteins) from many of these individuals to complement whole genome sequence information.

Having produced an unprecedented volume of high-throughput data, TOPMed now seeks to turn its attention to effectively leveraging this resource through novel systems biology analyses to uncover disease pathobiology. Although lower costs and technological improvements in sequencing technology have vastly expanded our ability to generate large volumes of omics data, the ability to analyze such large datasets to extract biologically meaningful insights from them remains challenging. Systems level models incorporating trans-omics analyses will be an important step in uncovering the underlying biological networks, gene-gene and gene-environment interactions influencing disease and treatment outcomes. Thus, advanced analyses that incorporate genotype and phenotype datasets from thousands to tens of thousands of individuals are required to move TOPMed to the next phase of discovery.

Suggested research examples include, but are not limited to:

-- Investigation of pleiotropic gene effects and gene expression patterns across several cardiovascular risk factors

-- Identification of biomarkers (metabolites, genetic variants and DNA methylation) related to severity of outcomes in sickle cell patients

-- Machine learning approaches to search for likely areas of the genome related to hypertension and chronic kidney disease in African Americans

-- Network analysis across genetic variation, expression profiling, and clinical data to reveal pathways associated with increased COPD risk

-- Spatio-temporal dynamic modeling approaches to integrate environment and geographic information into TOPMed for study of gene-environment interactions

 

 

NIST Measurement Science and Engineering (MSE) Research Grant Programs (2016-NIST-MSE-01)

Open to at least June 13, 2017

https://www.nist.gov/sites/default/files/documents/2017/05/24/2016-nist-mse-01_amendment_nofo.pdf

This program will accept proposals on an ongoing basis in 12 programs, which I summarize very briefly here. In almost all cases, the program makes research grants, collaborative research cooperative agreements, and conference grants.

1. Materials Measurement Laboratory ($10,000 to $1 million over up to five years). Supports collaborative research in materials science and engineering, materials measurement science, biosystems and biomaterials, biomolecular measurements, chemical sciences, and applied chemicals and materials. Also supports conferences. You can direct proposals to:

a. MML Office

b. Materials Science and Engineering Division

c. Materials Measurement Science Division

d. Biosystems and Biomaterials Division

e. Biomolecular Measurement Division

f. Chemical Sciences Division

g. Applied Chemicals and Materials Division

2. Physical Measurement Laboratory (PML) ($5,000 to $250,000 over up to five years). Supports research in the broad areas of mechanical metrology, semiconductors, ionizing radiation physics, medical physics, biophysics, neutron physics, atomic physics, optical technology, optoelectronics, electromagnetics, time and frequency, quantum physics, weights and measures, quantum electrical metrology, temperature, pressure, flow, far UV physics, and metrology with synchrotron radiation.

a. PML Office

b. Office of Weights and Measures

c. Radiation Physics Division.

d. Semiconductor and Dimensional Metrology Division

e. Quantum Measurement Division

f. Sensor Science Division

g. Quantum Electronics and Photonics Division.

h. Electromagnetics Division

i. Time and Frequency Division

j. Quantum Physics Division

3. Engineering Laboratory (EL) (each lab has different limits, but some exceed $1 million). Supports research in machine tool and machining process metrology; advanced manufacturing; intelligent systems and information systems integration for applications in manufacturing; structures, construction metrology and automation; inorganic materials; polymeric materials; heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration (HVAC & R) equipment performance; mechanical systems and controls; heat transfer and alternative energy systems; computer integrated building processes; indoor air quality and ventilation; smart grid; windstorm impact reduction; applied economics; and fire research.

a. Applied Economics Office

b. Smart Grid and Cyber-Physical Systems Program

c. Materials and Structural Systems Division

d. Energy and Environment Division

e. Systems Integration Division

f. Intelligent Systems Division

g. National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program

h. Disaster and Failure Studies Program

4. Fire Research (FR) Grant Program (no dollar amount specified). Develops, verifies, and utilizes measurements and predictive methods to quantify the behavior of fire and means to reduce the impact of fire on people, property, and the environment. This work involves integration of laboratory measurements, verified methods of prediction, and large-scale fire experiments to demonstrate the use and value of the research products.

a. Fire Fighting Technology Group.

b. Engineered Fire Safety Group

c. Flammability Reduction Group

d. Wildland Urban Interface Fire Group

e. The National Fire Research Laboratory

5. Information Technology Laboratory (ITL) (no dollar amount specified).  Supports research in the broad areas of Advanced Network Technologies, Big Data, Cloud Computing, Computer Forensics, Information Access, Information Processing and Understanding, Cybersecurity, Health Information Technology, Human Factors and Usability, Mathematical and Computational Sciences, Mathematical Foundations Of Measurement Science For Information Systems; Metrology Infrastructure for Modeling and Simulation Smart Grid, Privacy Engineering, Software Testing, Statistics for Metrology And Statistical Methods In Forensic Science.

6. Communications Technology Laboratory (CTL) (no dollar amount specified). Supports the accelerated development, testing, and deployment of advanced communications technologies in support of both commercial and government applications including: high-speed electronics, wireless systems metrology, antenna and RF capabilities, high-speed and high frequency measurement capabilities, advanced optics, quantum communications, network design and optimization, network modeling, and public safety network communications. Within CTL there are three divisions: the Public Safety Communications Research Division, the Radio-Frequency (RF) Technology Division, and the Wireless Networks Division.

7. NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) (no dollar amount specified). Supports research involving neutron scattering and the development of innovative technologies that advance the state-of-the-art in neutron research.

8. Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (CNST). This organization does not anticipate any new funding in 2015. This is a national user facility, so you can apply to perform collaborative research with NIST scientists. This program is specifically aimed at developing essential measurement and fabrication methods and technology in support of all phases of nanotechnology development, from discovery to production; conducting collaborative research with CNST staff scientists and engineers; and supporting researchers visiting CNST to conduct such collaborative research.

9. Special Programs Office (SPO) Grant Program (no dollar amount specified). This program supports the broad areas of greenhouse gas and climate science measurements, forensic science, national security standards, and measurement science for energy research in accordance with these four programs:

a. Greenhouse Gas (GHG) and Climate Science Measurements Program

b. National Security Standards (NSS) Program

c. Forensic Sciences Program (FSP)

d. Measurement Science for Energy Research Program.

10. Standards Coordination Office (SCO) (no dollar amount specified). This office supports standards-related activities, coordination activities with the private sector and with other federal agencies on standards activities and programs, and standards development and conformity assessment activities tailored to equip U.S. industry with the standards-related tools and information necessary to effectively compete in the global marketplace.

11. 11.International and Academic Affairs Office (IAAO) (no dollar amount specified). This program support activities which facilitate the development of metrology and related research capabilities to support the global metrology system consistent with the NIST mission in the following fields: bioscience, chemistry, materials, physics, engineering, infrastructure, information technology, neutron research and nanotechnology, with an emphasis on the Western Hemisphere and Africa.

12. Associate Director for Laboratory Programs (ADLP) Grant Program (no dollar amount specified). This supports bioscience, chemistry, materials, physics, engineering, infrastructure, information technology, neutron research and nanotechnology.

 

 

 

July

 

 

NSF Instrument Development for Biological Research (IDBR) (NSF 13-561)

Due July 31, 2013, July 25, 2014, and the last Friday in July annually after that

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2013/nsf13561/nsf13561.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_179

This program will make 10-12 Type A awards and 5 Type B awards from a $4 million pool for projects to develop new capabilities in biological research.

TYPE A - Innovation: Proposals for the development of novel instrumentation that provides new research capabilities or, where appropriate, that significantly improves current technologies by at least an order of magnitude in fundamental aspects such as accuracy, precision, resolution, throughput, flexibility, portability, breadth of application, costs of construction or operation, or user-friendliness.

TYPE B - Bridging: Proposals for transforming, ‘one of a kind' prototypes or high-end instruments into devices that are broadly available and utilizable without loss of capacity.

All proposals must include a strong dissemination plan discussing how you will share information about the instrumentation and, especially for Type B, how you will arrange for the research community to gain access to it. Partnering with industry is encouraged. Your dissemination plan also can include plans to start or team up with small companies to develop the concept using follow-on SBIR/STTR grants.

The solicitation also points out a similar program in the chemical sciences, Chemical Measurement and Imaging, PD 09-6880, http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=503413&org=CHE&from=home, due in October.

 

 

Naval Research Laboratory Broad Agency Announcement (N00173-17-S-BA01)

https://www.nrl.navy.mil/doing-business/contracting-division/baa/current

or https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=292151

Open indefinitely, released March 2, 2017

The Naval Research Laboratory has refreshed its Broad Agency Announcement, now known as BAA-N00173-17-S-BA01. White papers on any of the topics listed below will be accepted at any time. Full proposals will be invited.

Code 6000 Materials Science and Component Technology Directorate

Code 6040 - Laboratories for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics

60-17-01  HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING ON MASSIVELY PARALLEL ARCHITECTURES 

Code 6100 - Chemistry Division

61-17-01  POWER SOURCE MATERIALS AND SYSTEMS

61-17-02 CORROSION PROCESSES, CONTROL, MITIGATION, AND TECHNOLOGY

61-17-03  DEVELOPMENT OF MICROSENSORS AND MICROSYSTEMS FOR PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL, AND BIOCHEMICAL APPLICATIONS

61-17-04 APPLICATIONS OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY, BIOCHEMISTRY, ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY AND ADVANCED LASER TECHNIQUES

61-17-05  DEVELOPMENT OF DISTINGUISHING MARKS ON FLEXIBLE SUBSTRATES 

Code 6300 - Materials Science and Technology Division

63-17-01 MATERIALS PERFORMANCE, PROCESSING AND MODELING

Code 6700 - Plasma Physics Division

67-17-01 BASIC AND APPLIED RESEARCH IN HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMAS

Code 6800 - Electronics Science and Technology Division

68-17-01  RF VACUUM ELECTRONICS       

68-17-02 RADIATION EFFECTS RESEARCH

68-17-03 PHOTOVOLTAICS FOR PORTABLE POWER

68-17-04 ANALOG AND MIXED SIGNAL INTEGRATED CIRCUIT DESIGN AND CHARACTERIZATION

Code 6900 - Center for Biomolecular Sci and Engineering Division

69-17-01 RESEARCH IN BIO-MOLECULAR SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

OCEAN AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY DIRECTORATE  - CODE 7000 TOPICS

Code 7100 - Acoustics Division

71-17-01 ACOUSTIC SIMULATION, MEASUREMENTS AND TACTICS

Code 7200 - Remote Sensing Division

72-17-01 LOW FREQUENCY RADIO INTERFEROMETRY

72-17-02  OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF THE COASTAL REGIME

72-17-03  REMOTE SENSORS AND IMAGING SYSTEMS

Code 7300 - Oceanography Division

73-17-01 OCEAN DYNAMICS AND PREDICTION OCEANOGRAPHY

Code 7400 - Marine Geosciences Division

74-17-01 AIRBORNE, SHIPBOARD, AND OVERHEAD DATA ACQUISITION AND ANALYSIS

74-17-02 SEAFLOOR SCIENCES

74-17-03  GEOSPATIAL SCIENCES AND TECHNOLOGY

Code 7500 - Marine Meteorology Division

75-17-01  ATMOSPHERIC EFFECTS, ANALYSIS, AND PREDICTION

Code 7600 - Space Science Division

76-17-01  RESEARCH INTO SPACE, BACKGROUNDS, IMAGING AND MODELING

NAVAL CENTER FOR SPACE TECHNOLOGY- CODE 8000 TOPICS

Code 8200 - Spacecraft Engineering Department

82-17-01  SPACE AND SPACE SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY

 

 

August

 

 

NSF International Research Experiences for Students (12-551)       

Due August 18, 2015 and third Tuesday in August, annually thereafter

http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?WT.z_pims_id=12831&ods_key=nsf12551

The National Science Foundation has released Program Solicitation 12-551, International Research Experiences for Students (IRES). This changes and updates the previous IRES program.

IRES will support projects that provide international research opportunities to undergraduate and/or graduate students. Ideally, the students should be working within an established collaboration between the U.S. faculty advisor and the foreign collaborator, but new collaborations can be proposed, too. This year, for the first time, you can also propose to include teachers as trainees (talk to your program officer before proposing this). Each year, the students going overseas must have a “cohort” experience of being together as a team to prepare for the experience and to carry out the research at the foreign location.

The significant changes from the past:

1. The number of IRES competitions and award cycles per year is reduced from two to one, but this change is not intended to reduce the size of the program. A PI can submit only one proposal per year. There is no limit on the number of proposals per institution per year.

2. Principal Investigator and/or other U.S. administrative support salary has been added as an allowable expense, within a maximum allowable limit of $15,000 per year of the project.

3. This solicitation specifies that all projects must be of exactly three years' duration and send no fewer than three student cohorts abroad.

4. The maximum allowable budget per project is raised from $150,000 to $250,000 and the previous annual budget limit of $50,000 is removed entirely. Removal of the annual budget cap provides more project flexibility, but projects are still required to send a student cohort abroad in each of the three years of the project.

5. Language has been added that student participants "must" be US Citizens or Permanent Residents.

6. Language has been changed and/or added to strengthen the emphasis on more thorough recruitment and preparation of student participants, engagement of foreign research mentorship, high-quality research experiences coupled with appropriate support of US students in the foreign location, and post-experience follow-up for students' career enhancement and networking purposes.

7. Explicit IRES program considerations to be used in the review and ranking of proposals have been added.

8. The Doctoral Dissertation Enhancement Program (DDEP) has been removed from this solicitation.

9. Research Experience for Teachers (RET) has been added.